India has more farmers than any country in the world, and they are in a crisis that is unprecedented in human history. Every 30 minutes a farmer in India kills himself in despair. In a ... See full summary »

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Manjusha Ambarwar ...
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Ram Krishna ...
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Mahhav Shande ...
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Gyanendra Shukla ...
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Kishor Tiwari ...
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India has more farmers than any country in the world, and they are in a crisis that is unprecedented in human history. Every 30 minutes a farmer in India kills himself in despair. In a village at the center of the suicide epidemic, a farmer and his family struggle to keep his land and a teenage girl makes her first steps to become a journalist and tell the world about the crisis. Bitter Seeds raises questions about the human cost of genetically-modified agriculture and the future of how we grow things. This is the third film in Micha Peled's globalization trilogy, following the award-winning Store Wars: When Wal-Mart Comes to Town and China Blue. Written by Teddy Bear Films

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Every 30 minutes a farmer in India kills himself.

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1 September 2011 (USA)  »

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Featured in Moyers & Company: Banking on Greed (2012) See more »

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Worth watching if you care about the future of farming
9 March 2014 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

An excellent film that shows in real, life-and-death terms, the effects of multi-national companies as they expand their reach for profits. The topic of GMO seeds that filmmaker, Micha Peled focuses on are complex and layered, but he is able to synthesize the issue by focusing the lens on a single representative family as they make their way through one season of cotton farming in Central India. The new trials and vulnerabilities that they face as the necessary seeds get concentrated into new technologies controlled by Monsanto and marketed through layers of local sales agents and distributors, are profound and dire. With these seeds being generally ill-suited for the small-scale local farming that has sufficiently supplied a livelihood for millions, these shifts give way to a catastrophic undoing of centuries of a traditions and stability.


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