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Extreme Orbits - Clockwork and Creation 

The only reason life on Earth is possible is because of our stable orbit around the Sun. Elsewhere in the Universe, orbits are chaotic, violent and destructive. On the largest scale, orbits... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Narrator (voice) (as Erik Todd Dellums)
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Herself - Astronomer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (as Dr. Michelle Thaller)
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Himself - Astronomer, Discover Magazine (as Dr. Phil Plait)
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Himself - Theoretical Physicist, City University of New York (as Prof. Michio Kaku)
Geoff Marcy ...
Himself - Astronomer, University of California: Berkley (as Prof. Geoff Marcy)
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Himself - Theoretical Physicist, Arizona State University (as Prof. Lawrence Krauss)
Juna Kollmeier ...
Herself - Astrophysicist, Carnegie Observatories (as Dr. Juna Kollmeier)
Dan Coe ...
Himself - Astrophysicist, Space Telescope Science Institute (as Dr. Dan Coe)
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Himself - Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

The only reason life on Earth is possible is because of our stable orbit around the Sun. Elsewhere in the Universe, orbits are chaotic, violent and destructive. On the largest scale, orbits are a creative force and construct the fabric of the Universe. Written by Anonymous

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Documentary

Certificate:

TV-PG
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Details

Release Date:

8 August 2012 (USA)  »

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User Reviews

 
Very intriguing episode
7 July 2017 | by See all my reviews

Everything in the universe is in constant motion - most things move awfully fast, other things that seem stationary still move on an atomic level. Some planets have moons orbiting around them. Planets orbit stars or move in a trajectory through space. Stars, themselves, are in motion as well. Entire galaxies are in motion. Sometimes this results in collision, which results in destruction, but also the possibility for creation. It could be that we are only here today because of a necessary fusion of two massively important super-systems. New orbits can be created from collision. Planets that are located within a "Goldilocks" zone could well have been knocked into that specific zone by a big enough acting force.

This episode details all these sorts of things on the topics of orbits and motion in the universe. It is absolutely fascinating, but does not go too in depth, which, in my view, is the only large flaw of the episode. This episode does not explain things fully enough and leaves a lot of unanswered questions for the things it brings up. Also, it remains at a basic level the entire time, which I suppose may be fair enough considering the likely audience and the purpose of this show in the first place.


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