An Alien interfacer, who has the ability to converse with ET's, has until the end of the day to rid himself of his gift or risk succumbing to its terrible side-effect.

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Cast

Cast overview:
Christopher Bunworth ...
The Operative
Mark Diaco ...
Ash
...
Quentin
...
Alena
Georgina Naidu ...
Devon
...
Dez
...
Hannah
Mike McEvoy ...
Ray
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Storyline

Ash has the power to communicate with ETs, a gift he needs to strip himself of by the end of the day or he will succumb to its consuming side-effects. His powers are not only alienating him from people, but making him one of 'them' - cold, calculating and devoid of human emotion. He sets out on a mission to find a cure and to do that he must reconnect with his old life before the gift took over. Written by Leanne Hanley

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Sci-Fi

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May 2013 (UK)  »

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AUD 10,000 (estimated)
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User Reviews

 
A well crafted micro-budget indie film
7 May 2014 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

First-time filmmaker Adam Ciancio nails it with this psychological sci-fi indie film that borders between THE FOURTH KIND and JACOB'S LADDER.

Lead actor Mark Diaco skillfully walks a fine line between the worlds of reality and insanity, leaving the audience disoriented and intrigued.

As he meets more individuals, threading the clues toward his survival or extinction, it because increasingly blurred whether the aliens Ash (played by Diaco) sees are in his mind or really "out there".

But this was a fog that was meant to be - the movie leads you in a definite direction. But the final choice on what to believe is yours!

VESSEL was shot on the Red, but a camera in lesser directorial hands would have fallen flat. First-time director Adam Ciancio uses amazing locations (in his hometown of Melbourne, Austrailia) to provide a back world and landscape for the film that is sublime and visceral.

The dialog is sparse but sharp, the acting underplayed but appropriate (impressive for theater actors used to projecting emotions to their audience), and the cinematography and production value surprisingly top-notch for such a low budget film.

Films that leave you wondering at the end and that stay rooted in your mind are rare in the micro-budget film space. This is one of them! No spoilers ... just a recommendation to see it! A surprising little indie gem.


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