Museum Hours (2012) - News Poster

(2012)

News

‘Rat Film,’ ‘World Without End (No Reported Incidents)’ and More Non-Fiction Offerings Headline Annual Art of the Real Showcase

The Film Society of Lincoln Center has today announced the fourth edition of Art of the Real, their essential showcase for boundary-pushing nonfiction film, scheduled to take place April 20 – May 2. Billed as “a survey of the most vital and innovative voices in nonfiction and hybrid filmmaking,” this year’s showcase features an eclectic, globe-spanning host of discoveries, including seven North American premieres and eight U.S. premieres.

“In our fourth year we’ve put an emphasis on placing works by first-time and emerging filmmakers alongside established names, with the aim to highlight the experimentation happening across generations, and to trace a new trajectory of documentary art that points to its promising future,” said Film Society of Lincoln Center Programmer at Large Rachael Rakes, who organized the festival with Director of Programming Dennis Lim.

The Opening Night selection is the New York premiere of Theo Anthony’s “Rat Film,” which has
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Fits,’ ‘Neon Bull’ Nominated for Cinema Eye Heterodox Honors

‘The Fits,’ ‘Neon Bull’ Nominated for Cinema Eye Heterodox Honors
All These Sleepless Nights,” “The Fits,” “Kate Plays Christine,” “Mountains May Depart” and “Neon Bull” have been nominated for the Cinema Eye Honors Heterodox Award.

The award honors films that actively blur the line between narrative fiction and documentary. For the first time in Cinema Eye history, two films that are nominated for Cinema Eye’s nonfiction film craft honors are also nominated for the Heterodox Award — Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” for cinematography and score and Robert Greene’s “Kate Plays Christine” for direction.

Anna Rose Holmer’s “The Fits,” centering on an 11-year-old tomboy in a dance troupe, and Gabriel Mascaro’s “Neon Bull” premiered last year at the Venice Film Festival and Jia Zhangke’s “Mountains May Depart” debuted at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival. “Neon Bull,” a look at the world of Brazilian rodeo, won the Horizons (Orizzonti) – Special Jury Prize at Venice.

“Cinema Eye
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Film Festival Embraces Virtual Reality With 2017 New Frontier Program

Sundance Film Festival Embraces Virtual Reality With 2017 New Frontier Program
Yesterday, the Sundance Film Festival announced its feature competition categories. Today, the festival unveils its New Frontier section — which showcases the tech-enabled storytelling of tomorrow.

The boundary-pushing New Frontier category, which celebrated a decade of outside-the-box projects from the likes of James Franco and Joseph Gordon-Levitt earlier this year, is often overlooked by attendees focused on independent cinema, and yet frequently contains the festival’s most innovative fare. This year’s slate consists of the North American premiere of “Museum Hours”; director Jem Cohen’s latest format-challenging documentary, “World Without End (No Reported Incidents)”; a pair of live multimedia-enhanced performances (including one from “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty” director and Sundance veteran Terence Nance); 20 virtual-reality experiences; and 11 immersive installations — with additional projects still to come.

Three of the projects belong to Sundance’s “The New Climate” program — a thread of programming that calls attention to environmental issues and climate change.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Acquisition Rundown: Bleecker Street Buys ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas,’ Grasshopper Gets New Jem Cohen and More

Film Acquisition Rundown: Bleecker Street Buys ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas,’ Grasshopper Gets New Jem Cohen and More
Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

– Bleecker Street has announced it has acquired U.S. and select territory rights to “The Man Who Invented Christmas,” to be directed by Bharat Nalluri. The film will start shooting next month and is targeting a holiday 2017 release date.

The cast includes Dan Stevens as Charles Dickens, Christopher Plummer as Scrooge and Jonathan Pryce as Dickens’ father. The Solution is handling rights for the rest of the world. The script is written by Susan Coyne and is based on the book “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, published by Crown. The film recounts how Charles Dickens created the classic holiday fable, “A Christmas Carol.”

– Exclusive: Gravitas Ventures has announced it has acquired exclusive distribution rights
See full article at Indiewire »

Jem Cohen’s New Documentary, William Friedkin Follows an Exorcist, Modern ‘Roman Holiday’ Excursion & More

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Jem Cohen‘s (Museum Hours, Counting) new documentary, World Without End (No Reported Incidents), will be released in the U.S. by Grasshopper Film early next year. From the press release:

Quite close to London, but for many, a million miles away, Southend-on-Sea is a town along the Thames estuary. Jem Cohen’s new documentary, World Without End (No Reported Incidents), is a portrait of this place – everyday streets, everyday birds, unflagging tides, mud, and sky. But it is also about humanity and history, about prize-winning Indian curries, an encyclopedic universe of hats, and a nearly lost world of proto-punk music.

William Friedkin recently shadowed an Italian exorcist,
See full article at The Film Stage »

[Tribeca Review] First Monday In May

Following in the vein of last year’s excellent Ballet 422, First Monday In May offers another process-heavy view into the preparation of a prestigious event. This time, it’s the 2015 Met Ball and exhibition, China: Through the Looking Glass. But while Andrew Rossi’s documentary offers a sizable window into the production period by curator Andrew Bolton and his army of helpers, and equally surprising access into fashion icon Anna Wintour’s inner sanctum, First Monday In May is disappointingly shallow despite rich subject matter.

Fawning above all else, the Tribeca 2016 opener is handsomely crafted, but there’s a total lack of focus, let alone a visual identity. And it’s certainly not for lack of material. A gorgeous short film could have been made through a gliding tour of the finished exhibition, but as a full feature, Rossi never punctures the surface, leaving a sour taste of self-importance.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Counting Echoes with Jem Cohen

In 2012, Jem Cohen's feature film Museum Hours received critical acclaim, and earned Cohen a wider audience, partly for having ventured into narrative storytelling—while still upholding the same principles of his past work. His latest film, Counting, is partly a return to the mode he has long been recognized for. Divided into fofteem distinct, poetically intermeshing chapters, it is an essayistic travelogue in the spirit of the late Chris Marker (who receives an explicit dedication).>> - Adam Cook
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Interviews | Beatty, Simon, Costa

Interview has posted its 1972 conversation with Warren Beatty, who, at the time, was working on George McGovern's presidential campaign. More interviews: David Simon on The Wire, Treme and his forthcoming series, Show Me a Hero; William Friedkin on the 70s; Pedro Costa discusses Horse Money and the late Gil-Scott Heron; Jem Cohen explains why his new film, Counting, isn't all that different from Museum Hours; Rick Alverson on testing audience's patience with The Comedy and Entertainment; James Ponsoldt defends The End of the Tour; Greta Gerwig on Frances Ha and Mistress America; and The Believer's interview with Amber Tamblyn. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Looking and Listening: Jem Cohen on Counting

Hewing closely to the tradition of documentary as diaristic essay, Jem Cohen’s Counting moves from New York to Sharjah as the cinema eye ruminates on street life, destruction, displacement and disparate urban portraiture. Divided into 15 chapters, Counting seldom forces any conclusions, drawing on the viewers’ emotional responses to its alternately lyrical structure and literal depictions — the removal of Brooklyn’s iconic Kentile Floors sign among them. Filmmaker spoke to Cohen about where Counting falls in the documentary tradition, and how his approach was not all that different from his most recent “narrative,” Museum Hours. Counting is now in theaters from Cinema Guild. Filmmaker: What is your process on an essayistic […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Counting | Review

Overheard Yet Alive: Cohen Continues Poetic Pursuit of Travel

Jem Cohen invites us once again on a lackadaisical travelogue through cityscapes and unkempt streets, through museums and graveyards the world over. Rather than settling into a single city and involving us with charactorial allure as he did to striking effect in 2012’s Museum Hours, with Counting, the New York City-based filmmaker is content to document his travels over the course of the last few years from his home base to the Moscow, London, Istanbul and beyond, taking stock of the world’s increasing technological homogenization. Noting the quirky singularities of each of his chosen locales, cataloging each with episodic numerical reference points like a deck of cards shuffled together with the grace of a studied magician, casually precise, this is worth the full coach fare.

Unlike the late Chris Marker (whom the last chapters of the film are dedicated
See full article at ioncinema »

Watch: Lyrical 'Counting' Trailer Finds Poetry in Urban Decay and Life on the Street

Watch: Lyrical 'Counting' Trailer Finds Poetry in Urban Decay and Life on the Street
Read More: Cinema Guild Acquires Jem Cohen's New Documentary 'Counting' Cinema Guild has released the trailer and official poster for Jem Cohen's "Counting." The acclaimed director may have given a traditional narrative structure a try in "Museum Hours," but he returns to his typical experimental form of distant observation in the upcoming lyrical documentary. The film's official synopsis reads: "In fifteen linked chapters shot in locations ranging from Moscow to New York, "Counting" merges the city symphony, the diary film and the personal/political essay to create a vivid portrait of contemporary life. Perhaps the most personal of Cohen's films, the documentary measures street life, light and time, noting not only surveillance and overdevelopment but resistance and its phantoms as manifested in music, animals and everyday magic." Set in the winter, the juxtaposition of ghostly yet poetic images of urban wastelands...
See full article at Indiewire »

A Meeting In The Air: Jem Cohen’s "We Have An Anchor"

  • MUBI
Mainstream cinema culture is reluctant to reconcile the digital video versus film stock debate. As with any story of king and pretender to the throne, it is too easy to dichotomise and thus deny the possibility of a fruitful dialogue between past and future. When contrasts are characterised as oppositions, the space in between gets totally lost. Yes, film’s incumbency is on the wane and digital cinema’s ubiquity has arrived, but the instant that a paradigm shifts is hard to recognize and impossible to isolate. More likely, it is the very idea of competing film and digital aesthetics that will, in the future, be pointed to as the characteristic sentiment of the vague time during which the old film technologies were put away for good. But for now, we have purists on both sides advocating the essentialness and relevance of their chosen media, more or less to the exclusion of its alternative.
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Jem Cohen in London

Tonight in London, the Barbican presents We Have an Anchor, Jem Cohen's "cinematic love letter to Nova Scotia's Cape Breton. Multiple layered film projections are interspersed with texts ranging from poems to local folklore, and buoyed by [an] alternately ethereal and epic original score written and performed by members of Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Fugazi, Dirty Three and more." A Jem Cohen Film Season begins at Whitechapel Gallery on April 9 with a screening of Museum Hours and runs through May 28's presentation of Chain. And the Hackney Picturehouse will present Benjamin Smoke on May 17 and Instrument on May 18. All this occasions Sukhdev Sandhu's excellent profile for the Guardian. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Berlin 2015: 'Counting' review

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ Jem Cohen is perhaps best-known to UK audiences for his tenderly observant drama Museum Hours (2012). A comparable romantic outlook on the world and similarly intimate themes of urban identity are intermingled with much larger social concerns in his latest film essay, Counting (2015). A free-wheeling travelogue told across fifteen chapters, Cohen's latest is a composite of ideas forged through hypnotic visuals that leads the viewer on a mesmerising expedition through the city streets of such sprawling metropolises as New York, Moscow and Istanbul. The visual language employed within each chapter is as varied as the locations, yet travel is perhaps one of Counting's more noticeable reoccurring motifs.
See full article at CineVue »

Exclusive Poster for Ambitious Jem Cohen Doc 'Counting' Divides Itself

Exclusive Poster for Ambitious Jem Cohen Doc 'Counting' Divides Itself
In celebration of its world premiere today at the Berlin International Film Festival, Indiewire is excited to share the exclusive debut poster for Jem Cohen's documentary, "Counting." Cohen, who last directed 2013's award-winning hit "Museum Hours," shot his latest in locations ranging from Russia to New York City, and many believe the project to be his most personal documentary work yet. "Counting" is an ambitious non-fiction feature composed of 15 distinct but interconnected chapters that explore light, time and life on the streets, noting not only overdevelopment but resistance as manifested in music, animals and everyday magic. The complex structure of the film is foreshadowed in the striking poster's split imagery.  Cinema Guild acquired distribution rights to the documentary last week. "Counting" will open in theaters later this year. Check out the exclusive poster below: Read More: Cinema Guild Acquires Jem Cohen's New...
See full article at Indiewire »

Berlin: Cinema Guild Buys Documentary ‘Counting’ (Exclusive)

Berlin: Cinema Guild Buys Documentary ‘Counting’ (Exclusive)
Cinema Guild has bought distribution rights to Jem Cohen’s documentary “Counting” ahead of its world premiere at the Berlin Film Festival.

Cohen’s previous film, “Museum Hours,” was released by Cinema Guild in 2013. “Counting” will open in theaters later this year.

“Counting” also marks the first film to be handled by Cinema Guild’s new international sales unit, working to secure theatrical, broadcast and digital releases in international territories.

The film is comprised of 15 distinct but interconnected chapters, shot in locations from Russia to New York City to Istanbul.

“After their extraordinary work with ‘Museum Hours,’ I am thrilled to team with CG again,” Cohen said. “I consider them true comrades in film rather than mere business associates, and with ‘Counting’ I valued their input and ideas from the inception of the project.”

Cohen’s feature-length films include “Museum Hours,” “Chain,” “Benjamin Smoke,” “Instrument” and “Evening’s Civil Twilight in Empires of Tin.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Under the Skin,' 'Boyhood' among doc-centric Cinema Eye's narrative nominees

  • Hitfix
'Under the Skin,' 'Boyhood' among doc-centric Cinema Eye's narrative nominees
This year, Richard Linklater’s "Boyhood" played in the closing night slot of the True/False Film Fest, a festival dedicated to documentaries. The organizers explained the that, because of its documentary-like production schedule, the film represented something that only non-fiction is capable of. "For most casual filmgoers, the role of the producer may be mysterious, in part because their efforts are designed to be invisible onscreen. But a film like 'Boyhood,' seamless as a viewing experience, also demands that we acknowledge the epic care and attention to detail than went into its creation. What's more, Linklater's artistic process, by necessity, took into account the natural meanderings of his actor's lives, lending a verisimilitude to the action missing from many other fiction films." The folks behind the Cinema Eye awards clearly agree with True/False’s assessment and in the possibility that fiction can transcend its own narrative
See full article at Hitfix »

National Gallery | Review

  • ioncinema
Museum Hours: Wiseman’s Tour through London’s Famed Museum

If you’ve never been to The National Gallery in London, England, one of the most preeminent museums in the world, then Frederick Wiseman’s latest documentary, the simply named National Gallery, will appear to be something of a soothing, handsomely photographed introduction. Like a phantom floating through crowds and into behind-the-scenes operations, there’s even a bit of priceless perspective to be had on a tour, here presented as the learning experience many take for granted when they’re strewn haphazardly through the landscape of privileged youths. As solemn and well-thought as this documentary usually is, at a running time of three hours and without much more of a thrust than an all-encompassing experience of the renowned establishment, attentions spans may teeter in and out of sharply honed focused as our consciousness’ are restlessly pulled into the works on display themselves,
See full article at ioncinema »

Interview: Frederick Wiseman – National Gallery

  • ioncinema
Frederick Wiseman could be called a lot of things, but amongst those would surely be the word legend. With his latest feature, National Gallery, the chronicler of institutions has again applied his observational style this time to take in the sights and sounds that fill the halls of the National Gallery in London. As usual, he witnesses the politics that go on behind the scenes, but he also observes something much more surprising in the connections yielded between the art world and the whole of human history. While restorations of canonical paintings take place in some quiet nook of the massive safehold, aural tours and participatory workshops are seen challenging visitors to establish historical context in relation to the works on display.

Though the film found its premiere as one of only a handful of documentaries in the lineup at Cannes earlier this year, I caught National Gallery while playing
See full article at ioncinema »

National Gallery | Review

  • ioncinema
Museum Hours: Wiseman’s Three-Hour Documentary Is a Riveting Essay About Narrative Construction

The latest entry in Frederick Wiseman’s tireless career project, which attempts to capture and reveal the systems and procedures within a vast variety of cultural and state institutions, is his most purely compelling and subtly provocative film in years. Focusing on the ins, outs, and in-betweens of the National Gallery in London, this is largely comprised of footage of museum visitors looking and listening, and tour guides talking and instructing; meanwhile, behind the gallery walls, a bureaucratic network of administrators, curators, and executives debate topics ranging from advertising and marketing strategies to crippling budget cuts. From every angle, stories ares being told, and histories being enforced. As always, Wiseman observes rather than imposing upon the goings-on, and he shapes his material in such a way that we can make our own judgments about what we
See full article at ioncinema »
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