A Navajo Indian has crossed the great desert, and his water bottle has been emptied. He is in a frenzy from thirst and sees mirages of water everywhere. He comes upon Nat Perry, a young ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Will Brown
...
Kate Brown
...
Nat Perry
Edit

Storyline

A Navajo Indian has crossed the great desert, and his water bottle has been emptied. He is in a frenzy from thirst and sees mirages of water everywhere. He comes upon Nat Perry, a young settler, who is conveying his household goods across the burning sands. Perry has just taken a drink from his precious canteen when the Indian falls at his feet and implores a little water. The young pioneer heartlessly turns him over with his foot and leaves him to die. Kate and Will Brown are passing in a prairie "schooner." They see the Indian's plight and revive him, load him into their vehicle and proceed on their journey. Two years later the Indian as a valued friend and servant, when he has an altercation with Perry over the latter's conduct in the desert and is fatally wounded. He crawls to his employer's home and dies, but before he passes to the great beyond he tells the young settlers the secret of a lost gold mine and gives them a rude map which will help them to find it. Perry has ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Romance | Western

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 July 1910 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Startling enough to arouse the most jaded consciousness
29 July 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Even an Indian may communicate valuable information, and if one falls at your feet in the desert, imploring you to give him water, don't kick him. He may repay the kindness with telling you where to find a gold mine. The interesting feature of this film, the race of the young wife for the land office, is exciting. To see her go down the mountainside, swinging far out on a lariat, is startling enough to arouse the most jaded consciousness. It is a good picture, and one feels like extending personal congratulations when the sheriff arrests the villain and the wealth belongs to the young couple. - The Moving Picture World, July 30, 1910


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?