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2014 | 2013 | 2012

1-20 of 425 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Venice: Pyramide Strikes Early Sales on ‘Last Hammer Blow’ (Exclusive)

47 minutes ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tapping into France’s new generation of femme filmmakers, Pyramide Intl. has struck early sales on Alix Delaporte’s “The Last Hammer Blow,” which world premieres in competition at Venice.

Pyramide will also handle international sales on Lucie Borleteau’s Locarno competition hit “Fidelio: Alice’s Journey,” which Pyramide Distribution releases Dec. 24 in France.

In first “Hammer Blow” sales, Palace Films acquired rights to Australia and New Zealand, and Lumiere to Benelux territories.

Starring theater vet Gregory Gadebois and Clotilde Hesme,“Hammer Blow” turns, however, on a teen: Victor who, when he enters the Montpellier Opera House, knows nothing about music nor his father (Gadebois), who is about to conduct Mahler’s 6th Symphony. Music, however, allows their halting relationship to grow.

Hailed by France’s Telerama as a “true discovery,” actress-turned-director Borleteau’s debut “Fidelio” centers on Alice (Ariane Labed, “Before Midnight”), a 30-year-old sailor. She embarks as second mate on Fidelio, »

- John Hopewell

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Film Review: Sachs' Latest Comparable to Bergman, Godard, De Sica

23 August 2014 10:29 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Love Is Strange’ movie review: Gay romantic drama is ‘beautiful in every way’ (photo: John Lithgow and Alfred Molina in ‘Love Is Strange’) Love Is Strange is beautiful in every way that a film can be beautiful, and unabashedly so. Yet, despite its willingness to gild the lily for love of ethereal, aesthetic beauty in all its forms, it is a film that reaches for the truth — the deepest truths of what we often call “the human condition.” For all these reasons I love Ira Sachs’ movie as much as it wishes we would love each other. I love the artistry of it. I love what it has to say and that it’s something seldom said. I love that it is forgiving. Without hyperbole, I tell you that Love Is Strange is the stuff of Jean-Luc Godard (Notre Musique and In Praise of Love), Vittorio De Sica (Umberto D. »

- Tim Cogshell

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Film Review: ‘Love Island’

12 August 2014 4:45 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Helmers with an impressive run of serious-issue movies should be applauded for changing style occasionally and making comedies, yet Jasmila Zbanic’s cringe-worthy “Love Island” is a misfire on all counts. Set in a Croatian summer resort populated by kooky holiday makers, this Europudding laffer follows a couple whose marriage turns rocky when the pregnant wife reconnects with her first love, another woman. Aiming for a “Mamma Mia” vibe but even more cartoonish, the pic will no doubt get decent distribution in Europe, and may see respectable returns in dubbed versions.

French Liliane (Ariane Labed, “Alps,” “Before Midnight”) and Bosnian Grebo (Ermin Bravo, in his third Zbanic film) come to the coast from Sarajevo for sun and fun. Grebo in particular lets loose, demonstrating his former-rocker chords to an appreciative audience of vacationers who are keen to party. Then Liliane locks eyes with Flora (Ada Condeescu, “Loverboy”), the entertainment hostess at the resort, »

- Jay Weissberg

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2015 Oscar Predictions: First Look at the Best Original Screenplay Category

7 August 2014 1:30 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Another day, another new category as I continue to open the doors to my 2015 Oscar predictions, today exploring the other half of this year's screenplays with 19 contenders for Best Original Screenplay and in this category there may be a little more to discuss as more of the films on my list have actually been seen. To begin my #1 is Richard Linklater's screenplay for Boyhood. Twelve years in the making and to see the finished product makes me wish I was privy to his notes from the very beginning to see how it all ended up. Linklater has seen his screenplays for Before Sunset and Before Midnight (both co-written with Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy) nominated in the past and given the overwhelming love for this film I think it's safe to assume a third nomination is in the offing and right now I see it as the definite front-runner »

- Brad Brevet

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Richard Linklater Drops 'Limpet,' Eyes 'Dazed & Confused' Sequel 'That's What I'm Talking About' Next

5 August 2014 6:20 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Everything’s coming up roses for Richard Linklater these days. After stumbling slightly during the mid–2000s, the Texan's filmography is in great shape following the triptych of “Bernie,” last year’s swoon-worthy “Before Midnight” and this year’s fantastic and much-discussed “Boyhood.” With that “time sculpture” finally released, Linklater is looking for another project, and it may be one that’s been percolating for as long as “Boyhood.” During the run-up to the release of “Bernie,” Linklater was eyeing a return to the studio system, circling a remake of the 1964 Don Knotts-starring live-action/animation hybrid “The Incredible Mr. Limpet.” The project developed in fits and starts, but "that project's not happening. The financing kind of went away," the director said last month. "That's the thing with those announcements. You never know the reason why it gets announced, but it's usually someone on the financing or sales side trying to. »

- Cain Rodriguez

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Movie Review: Boyhood

4 August 2014 8:39 PM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

What Richard Linklater’s Boyhood accomplishes is due the highest praise; as a feat of extended cinematic biography, there have been few experiments as rounded, detailed, and character-developed as this twelve-year gamble.

Nailing my heart to the wall with a good growing-up tale is a favorite cinematic past-time going back to a lot of young, smart French faces in the 1950s and 1960s; Russian kids with militarized gazes but poetic minds; the amazing Killer of Sheep’s gentle look at black youth in 1970s Los Angeles. Richard Linklater has contributed his share of closely-observed movies on adolescence, from his debut self-starring film It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988) and breakout indie ramble Slacker (1991)to the evergreen Dazed & Confused (1993) and Before… series (1995-2013), Linklater returns to the philosophical delusions of youth and retrospect realities of age again and again. Boyhood is one of his most generous gifts yet, »

- Gregory Fichter

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The Dark Knight Legacy – A Retrospective

3 August 2014 7:39 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

In one of his regular Uncut series of editorials following the release of Before Midnight, esteemed critic Mark Kermode posed an intriguing question; what is the perfect film trilogy? Given the subject, naturally Richard Linklater’s Before… trio was mooted, along with the more traditional suggestions of Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and The Godfather, and the perhaps most objectively reasonable pick of Toy Story. Regardless of your personal choice, there can be little doubting that movie trilogies as a whole wind up becoming divisive. There are few consistent enough to merit consideration as a perfect whole. The aforementioned Godfather is let down by its third entry, numerous notches below the masterpieces of Parts 1 & 2. Likewise Star Wars. Even Lord of the Rings suffers naysayers regarding Fellowship and Two Towers. Could it be that, in such a tricky field, The Dark Knight saga is worthy of an honorable mention?

It is a strange thought. »

- Scott Patterson

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Ethan Hawke goes back and forth in time in Predestination trailer

21 July 2014 3:39 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Ethan Hawke (Before Midnight) reunites with the directors of Daybreakers for another jaunt into genre. This time Hawke and the Spierig brothers are tackling time-travel with their next film, Predestination. Hawke plays a “temporal agent” – a professional time-traveller – whose job it is to go back and forth through time, changing history to save lives. His next target is the mass murder of 11,000 people by a terrorist called “Fizzle Bomber.”

Predestination also stars newcomer Sarah Snook and Noah Taylor (Almost Famous, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider). No word yet on when it’ll hit theatres.

Check out the trailer for Predestination below, and remember that you can catch Ethan Hawke on the big screen right now in the critically acclaimed film by Richard LinklaterBoyhood.

For more Ethan Hawke, see our list of his top five roles from slacker to Sunrise. »

- Sasha James

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Boyhood

19 July 2014 1:02 PM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Boyhood

Directed by: Richard Linklater

Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Lorelei Linklater, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Running Time: 2 hrs 30 mins

Rating: R

Release Date: July 18, 2014 (Chicago)

Plot: The story of a boy’s maturation, shown over the course of twelve years.

Who’S It For? Fans of films about life (yeah, I said it).

Overall

Filming the development of a boy’s life over the course of twelve years, Boyhood uniquely captures the wonder of how a person blossoms from the origins of a simple human being. The life of young non-actor Ellar Coltrane, and the character he plays, vividly expresses the way in which we are influenced by the lives of people around us through the gradual passage of time.

Divided into year-long chapters that start its main character at the age of six and leave him when he goes to college, Boyhood follows Coltrane’s character Mason as he, his sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater, »

- Nick Allen

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Ethan Hawke rants about zebras and unicorns in exclusive clip from Boyhood

17 July 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

I don’t know about you, but as long as Ethan Hawke (Before Midnight) is in a movie, talking as quickly as a Gilmore Girl on espresso, I will enjoy it. It helps that his next film, Boyhood, is written and directed by Richard Linklater, who brought the Before Sunrise trilogy into fruition with Hawke and his co-star Julie Delpy. All of this, partnered with the overwhelmingly positive critical response, has us exceedingly impatient to see Boyhood, a film twelve years in the making.

Below we have an exclusive clip from Richard Linklater’s latest film with a glimpse into what Ethan Hawke’s character must be like as a father – and he seems like a pretty good dad.

Boyhood also stars Patricia Arquette (True Romance) and newcomer Ellar Coltrane, and plays Cineplex theatres in a limited release starting on July 18, 2014.

For more Ethan Hawke, see our list of his »

- Sasha James

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Interview: Director Richard Linklater Kept Going Back to ‘Boyhood’

16 July 2014 3:23 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Director Richard Linklater is a great American storyteller. In 2002, he embarked on a filmmaking journey that would be twelve years long, and conceived a fictional tale of a boy as he ages from age six to 18. Using the same actors over all those years, the result is the epic and philosophical “Boyhood.”

The power of “Boyhood” is embraced by the boy’s life cycle – portrayed by Ellar Coltrane through the ages. The ups and downs of his short but eventful existence is experienced as he grows during the 12 years. The basis for his perspective is forged through the difficulties of his estranged parents, two stepfathers and his mother’s dogged determination to keep everything together for him and his sister (portrayed by Richard Linklater’s daughter, Lorelei). Patricia Arquette (Mom) and the venerable Linklater collaborator Ethan Hawke (Dad) are around for the whole ride, and there is a poignancy »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Interview: Richard Linklater Examines 'Boyhood,' Memory, Time & Perspective

15 July 2014 8:36 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Richard Linklater says making "Boyhood" was "unlike any film ever," and it's hard to disagree with him. Plenty of movies have spent more than a decade stuck in turnaround, but there's nothing in the history of fiction film to match the unique process of "Boyhood," shooting several days each year for 12 years and then turning the results into a poetic and deeply moving look at how time changes us in ways we both do and don't see (If the title weren't already taken, "Boyhood" could easily have been called "Life Itself.") Since its late-breaking debut at Sundance, Linklater's sprawling but intimate story has been met with near-universal praise, and continued a winning streak that, after "Bernie" and "Before Midnight," is rivaled only by the early threepeat of "Slacker," "Dazed and Confused" and "Before Sunrise." The title "Boyhood" implies a certain perspective, but one of »

- Sam Adams

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Podcast Bonus: Audio Interview with 'Boyhood' Director, Richard Linklater

14 July 2014 3:30 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

As I promised I would do for premium listeners, what follows is my full interview with Boyhood director Richard Linklater, which I posted in text form last Monday. Linklater and I discuss his new film, you'll get to hear my mispronounce Ellar Coltrane's name not once, but twice before Linklater corrects me and more, most of which made my final interview, but a few snippets that didn't. At the beginning of the interview you'll hear us discussing the Before franchise of films as we got started based on a conversation I had with the local publicist as to which was the best film to begin with as well as about five minutes at the end where he tries to locate the small church from Before Midnight on Google Maps on my phone. We never found it... Note: If you are not yet a subscriber, there are still a couple »

- Brad Brevet

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Quiz: How much do you know about Boyhood star Ethan Hawke?

14 July 2014 8:27 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Ethan Hawke and Richard Linkalter must have a great relationship.  Since the actor starred in Linklater's film Before Sunrise back in 1995, the pair have teamed up for two Before sequels and a handful of other projects (The Newton Boys, anyone?).  They've also spent every summer for the past twelve years together.

Each summer, Linklater has reunited a cast and crew to film the movie Boyhood, which hits theatres this Friday. The fictional film documents the life of a young boy as he grows and matures from age 5 to 18.  Hawke and Patricia Arquettestar as the parents of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) in this unique and original film, who have watched the young star grow in front of their eyes, both on and off screen.  

With almost 30 years of acting under his belt, Hawke has treated us to everything from sci-fi and real-life dramas such asAlive, to Shakespearean adaptations and comedies like Reality Bites which define a generation. »

- Rachel West

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Sunday Shorts: ‘Woodshock’, co-directed by Richard Linklater

13 July 2014 12:06 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Today’s film is the 1985 short Woodshock. A documentary covering the 1985 incarnation of the Woodshock music festival, the short is co-directed by Lee Daniel and Richard Linklater. Over the course of a career spanning nearly 20 years, Linklater has amassed critical and commercial acclaim for numerous features, including Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight, Waking Life, and School of Rock. His newest feature, titled Boyhood, opened in limited release in American theatres this weekend.

****

The post Sunday Shorts: ‘Woodshock’, co-directed by Richard Linklater appeared first on Sound On Sight. »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Exclusive Video Interview With The Cast And Director Of Boyhood

12 July 2014 6:45 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Richard Linklater has had quite an illustrious career so far, spanning the iconic stoner comedy Dazed And Confused to emotionally touching movies like Before Sunset and Before Midnight, but no project meets the ambition of his latest cinematic triumph - Boyhood. Wanting to capture every essence of adolescence during the maturity of one lucky actor, Linklater met with his cast and crew for a few weeks each year for twelve years and developed a story about one child’s exploration into manhood from the humble beginnings of a wide-eyed toddler. Yes, this is a project over 12 years in the making – and it’s undoubtedly worth the wait.

There’s something about growing with actor Ellar Coltrane and actress Lorelei Linklater (yes, Richard’s daughter) that ensures a strong connective bond, harkening back to our very own childhood experiences. Every phase is captured, from rebellious times to more mature glances of puberty, »

- Matt Donato

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Writer-Director Linklater's Boyhood Is 'Conceptually Briliant'

12 July 2014 1:50 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Boyhood’ movie review: Richard Linklater has created ‘conceptually brilliant new film’ (photo: Ellar Coltrane in ‘Boyhood’) Director Richard Linklater once said, “The most unique property of cinema is how it lets you mold time, whether it’s over a long or a very brief period.” Indeed, time — and our relationship to it both philosophically and practically — has been an ongoing theme in Linklater’s work over the course of his now lengthy career, and it is once again at the center of the writer-director’s conceptually brilliant new film, which took more than twelve years to nurture: Boyhood. When we first meet Mason (Ellar Coltrane), he’s six years old and living with his mother (Patricia Arquette) and sister (Lorelei Linklater, the filmmaker’s daughter) in a small town in Texas; his dad (Ethan Hawke) is a better-than-average weekend-warrior of an absentee father. Mason is a quirky kid with an »

- Tim Cogshell

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The Films of Richard Linklater: Ranked From Best to Worst

11 July 2014 12:28 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Justin Chang: Andrew, if you’ll allow me a brief (sort of) digression before we get down to business: A few nights ago, as part of our foolhardy mission to rank the films of Richard Linklater, I watched “Waking Life” for the first time since I’d seen it at a college screening in 2001. Back then, we were both sophomores at USC (though we didn’t know each other at the time), and presumably of the ideal age and mindset to groove on the film’s kaleidoscopic visuals and similarly trippy discourse. I recall having been more bored than seduced at the time, though I’m happy to say that my very different reaction following this second viewing — which began around midnight, all the better to cultivate the optimal bleary-eyed dream state — was enough to move “Waking Life” a few notches up my own list.

At a certain point late into the movie, »

- Justin Chang and Andrew Barker

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'Boyhood' Review: 10 Things You Need to Know Before Seeing the One-of-a-Kind Drama

11 July 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Yes, the current cinematic landscape is filled with giant, towering transformers that can handily destroy large swaths of both Chicago and China, super-intelligent apes leading a revolt against humanity, and dueling, computer-generated dragons. But the most epic film of the summer, maybe the entire year, is entering into limited release this weekend, available only in boutique cinemas or art house theaters. And that movie is "Boyhood."

This is a movie that has literally been filming for 12 years. Writer/director Richard Linklater, previously responsible for "Dazed and Confused" and "School of Rock," would gather his actors once a year and film for a few days, with the ultimate goal of chronicling how a young boy grows up. But this isn't some stodgy documentary; this is a fictionalized account of adolescence that is full of very dramatic moments.

But is this something that impenetrably artsy? Or something that is worth leaving the multiplex for? »

- Drew Taylor

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Boyhood movie review: time in a cinematic bottle

11 July 2014 5:46 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

An audacious coming-of-age tale unique in the history of cinema; deeply moving and beautifully authentic. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m a fan of Richard Linklater

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

We’ve seen children grow up onscreen before. Ron Howard. Jodie Foster. All the Harry Potter kids. But not like this. Not in a single film. Richard Linklater had the audacious idea to shoot a story about almost the entire span of one boy’s childhood using the same actors over the course of a dozen years. Audacious because such a long production time — probably the longest ever in the history of cinema — comes with unique challenges. (The most dramatic one might be: What if one of your actors dies midway? Recasting would have ruined the beautiful authenticity the film aims for, and achieves.) Audacious because in retrospect, »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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2014 | 2013 | 2012

1-20 of 425 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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