Love (2012) - News Poster

(I) (2012)

News

Udine’s Far East Fest to Fete Chinese Helmer Feng Xiaogang, Open With Japan’s ‘Survival Family’

Rome – Japanese director Shinobu Yagouchi’s road movie “Survival Family,” about a Japanese family’s efforts to stay alive amid a global blackout, will open the upcoming 19th edition of the Far East Festival in Udine, Italy, Europe’s biggest showcase of genre and mainstream Asian cinema. The film will be shown on April 21.

Chinese helmer Feng Xiaogang (pictured), who is known as “China’s Spielberg,” will be honored at the Udine fest, which will screen his latest film, “I Am Not Madame Bovary.”

“Survival Family,” which bowed recently at the Macao fest, is among 25 European premieres unspooling in Udine.

The festival has also secured Hong Kong superstar Andy Lau’s “Shock Wave” as its closer on April 29, shortly after the hotly anticipated actioner’s Asian release, on April 20, a clear indication of how well-integrated this event is within Asia’s film scene.

The lineup boasts four world premieres, including
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shu Qi Stars in Taiwanese Action-Comedy Film The Village of No Return

Award-winning director Chen Yu-Hsun teams up with Taiwanese star Shu Qi to tickle your funny bone with the upcoming comedy film The Village of No Return.

Since his first feature Tropical Fish in 1995, this $9M feature is Chen’s sixth film foray in the comedy genre.

From his hilarious TV commercials to memorable shorts (Middle-Aged Juliet, Hippocamp Hair Salon), well received features like Love Go Go and Zone Pro Site: The Movable Feast, Chen takes the director’s seat again with this period action comedy flick.

The film is set sometime during the end of the Qing dynasty, a very strange event take place and turns a sleepy rural village’s life upside down–all while waiting for a railway to come.

The Village of No Return also reunites Chen with producers Yeh Jufeng, Lee Lieh, and Warner Brothers (Taiwan), following their breakout hit Zone Pro Site.

The Taiwanese comedy
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

China Box Office: ‘Line Walker’ Leads in Crowded Field

China Box Office: ‘Line Walker’ Leads in Crowded Field
Line Walker,” a big screen adaptation of a Hong Kong TV detective series, became the fifth Chinese language movie in six weeks to head the box office in China. Its modest score and the mediocre per screen averages suggest that nothing on offer currently boasts a ‘must see’ factor.

Produced by Shaw Brothers, Tvb, Media Asia and Chinese partners, the film opened on Thursday (Aug 11), a day ahead of a chasing pack of other films opening on Friday. That meant it ate into the the screens of previous winner “Time Raiders” and was able to bank $8.56 million ahead of the Friday to Sunday weekend. It went on to win all three subsequent days scoring 26.9 million over the weekend and $35.8 million after four days.

Second placed film was romance “Love O2O” starring Angelababy and Jing Boran (also in ‘Time Raiders”.) It managed 118.1 million in three days.

Hong Kong-made martial arts
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shanghai Film Festival Review: ‘Cold War 2’

Shanghai Film Festival Review: ‘Cold War 2’
Slow to heat up yet quick to burn out, police procedural-thriller “Cold War 2” dramatizes internal strife and conspiracy among Hong Kong’s police force and ruling elite, adding some new twists in a narrative framework that ultimately can’t support the film. Still, directing duo Longman Leung and Sunny Luk do an admirable job walking the tightrope of servicing the mainland market while making an eloquent defense of the former British colony’s benchmarks, namely rule of law and clean governance. “Cold War” was Hong Kong’s highest grossing domestic film in 2012; the sequel’s stellar cast has helped secure sales to nine Asian countries, but it’s probably heading for middling business in China.

Leung and Luk’s debut feature tweaked the formula of crime thrillers by highlighting the inherent conflict between operation and management within Hong Kong’s police system. Deputy commissioner M.B. Lee (Tony Leung Ka-fai) is a Dirty-Harry-like man of action beloved by the rank-and-file; his rival Sean Lau (Aaron Kwok) is a buttoned-up bureaucrat unpopular for his predilections for protocol and cost-cutting. The sequel, rather than delving more deeply into their backgrounds and motivations, merely telegraphs their intensifying rift via frowns and irate stare-downs.

“Cold War” ended with M.B. turning in renegade son Joe (Eddie Peng) for orchestrating the disappearance of an armored police van. As in the original, “Cold War 2” conspicuously extols Hong Kong as “Asia’s safest city,” yet the events that unfold suggest it’s any but, starting off with a hostage crisis that goes terribly wrong on a crowded subway, with new police commissioner Sean humiliatingly handcuffed to a bomb. It’s all an elaborate stunt to get Joe out of prison, and Sean’s leadership is called into question by an investigative committee appointed by the Legislative Council (Legco).

One of committee members is Oswald Kan (Chow Yun-fat), a retired high court judge and legal authority. He appears to be courted by the camp of Edward Lai (Waise Lee), a bureaucrat with ambitions of becoming the next Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Zone. Meanwhile, M.B. comes face-to-face with the powerful consortium that’s been goading Joe’s reckless behavior. Sean also has his allies: beleaguered police PR head Phoenix (Charlie Young, having less to do but looking more stressed than in the first film) and Billy Cheung (Aarif Lee Rahman), the cocky officer from the Independent Commission Against Corruption who helps him undertake unauthorized surveillance operations.

After offering penetrating details on the inner workings of the Hkpd in their debut, Leung and Luk try to up the ante by examining the crossover between police and legislative authorities. However, the information they dish out is even more dense, with a deluge of job titles introduced together with a fleet of characters that rattle on about policy and procedure, turning the first hour into a live-action government white paper. None of this helps to stoke tension in the rekindled friction between M.B. and Sean, whose antipathy in the previous story was developed with electrifying effect.

The film does show gumption in mounting a scathing put-down of wheeling-and-dealing among government top brass, who allocate power and plot their succession the way freemasons or frat boys do. But Jack Ng’s screenplay lacks the acerbic insight or passionate righteousness of similar political thrillers from Korea, like “Inside Men” or “The Attorney.” The role of Oswald provides an excuse to rope in Chow for star wattage; his ambivalent stance vis-a-vis the overtures of Edward and his cronies proves frustrating rather than intriguing.

More engaging is how the story lays out an ingenuously intricate network of loyalties within these institutions, as when M.B. plays his protege Mok against Phoenix, who was Mok’s apprentice, but M.B. is in turn beholden to his one-time boss and former Police Commissioner Peter Choi (Chang Chen’s father Chang Kuo-chu, from “Love Massacre”). What governs these ties are old school values of respect for veterans, as well as shared histories of danger and mutual support, a human dimension that’s not just about scratching each others’ backs.

M.B.’s guilt toward juniors who willingly became his fall guys in the past gets the better of his principles. And his fear for Joe’s safety outweighs his own thirst for power, lending a sympathetic facet to his volatile persona. Leung, who won best actor at the Hong Kong Film Awards for his original portrayal of M.B., is again a powerhouse of complex thoughts and raw emotion, exemplified by a take-no-prisioners operation he’s forced to spearhead to hunt down his own men, the only episode that achieves genuine pathos. Yo (a.k.a. Tony) Yang steals the scene as an ex-cop of brooding masculinity, whose taciturn stoicism reflects the film’s theme of how the idealistic but rash younger generation is susceptible to manipulation by recalcitrant old men clinging to power.

Tech credits by the ace Hong Kong crew from the first film are solid here, but lack stylistic flair. Jason Kwan’s cinematography out-dazzles the original with swinging cranes and flyover shots of the city’s unnaturally green landscapes and nocturnal skylines – for no reason whatsoever. Action setpieces are more scarce than the previous production, but Chin Ka-lock’s car stunts are spectacular, especially a heart-stopping multiple crash inside a tunnel.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

FilMart: Wanda, Warner on Board Ablaze Image’s ‘Village That Forgets’

Independent Taipei-based sales agency, Ablaze Image is handling “The Village That Forgets,” a Taiwanese martial arts comedy that includes China’s Wanda Pictures and Warner Bros. (F.E), the Taiwanese unit of Warner, among its investors.

Albaze will fire up international sales on the picture at this week’s FilMart in Hong Kong. It is also unveiling “Foret Debussy” a dark drama starring Gwei Lun-mei.

“Village” is directed by successful Chen Yu-Hsun (“Zone Pro Site: The Movable Feast,” “Tropical Fish”) and is the story of a mysterious event happening in a rural village by the end of the Qing Dynasty.

The film stars Shu Qi (“The Assassin,” “Mojin: The Lost Legend”), Wang Qianyuan (“Saving Mr. Wu”), Hong Kong’s Eric Tsang (“Monster Hunt,” “From Vegas to Macau II”), Chang Hsiao-Chuan, Tony Yang and Lin Mei-Hsiu. It also reunites producers Lee Lieh (“Meeting Dr. Sun”) and Yeh Jufeng (“Our Times”), who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Here Are The Key Nominess For The 10th Asian Film Awards

On March 17, at Macau’s Venetian Theater the 10th Asian Film Awards will be underway. Winners from nearly 1,600 submissions from 32 countries will be announced. Since its inauguration in 2007, the award has grown in scale and is now largest film awards event in Asia.

This year, The Assassin has the most nominations (best film, director, actress, supporting actress, cinematography, original music, costume design, production design, and sound). This historical drama featuring Shu Qi has been hailed as “the most ravishingly beautiful film Hou [Hsiao-hsien] has ever made, and certainly one of his most deeply transporting” by Variety.

Bajirao Mastani by Sanjay Leela Bhansali follows with five nominations. This Indian historical romance is one of the highest grossing Indian films of all time. It will compete with The Assassin, Three Stories of Love (Koibito Tachi, Japan), Mr Six (Hu Guan, China) and Veteran (Ryoo Seung-wan, South Korea) in the Best film category.

Asian
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The Conversation: Das ist Berlin

The Berlin International Film Festival continued to challenge expectations in its 66th edition, landing another auteur heavy competition line-up, albeit a slightly less sensational one than the landmark 2015 program. Although an attempt continues to be made to establish grand motifs between films in competition and the more experimental sidebars, topical issues seemed to be the name of the game across the board, particularly immigration. This culminated with this year’s Golden Bear winner, Gianfranco Rosi’s Fire at Sea, a documentary which was the clear early favorite and remained so up until the awards ceremony. Rosi has now won two major film festivals with his documentary work (previously taking home the top prize at Venice 2013 for Sacro Gra), and further solidifies an argument for the Cannes Film Festival to follow suit and allow documentary titles to play in the main competition. Berlin notably had two documentaries in the main competition this year,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Berlinale ’16: Gallery: The Winners Press Conference

We’re rounding up our coverage of Berlinale ’16 with a gallery of images from tonight’s winners press conference in the Grand Hyatt here in Berlin. It has been an absolute pleasure to be here for the past ten days at the Berlinale, which we agree is one of the best film festivals in the world.

You can check out a full list of the 2016 winners tonight over here, and our full coverage of Berlin 2016, over here.

So, until next year, Auf Wiedersehn…

The Winners Press Conference Gallery

Audi Short Film Award

Jin Zhi Xia Mao – Taiwan – Dir: Chiang Wei Liang

Silver Bear Jury Prize (Short Film)

A Man Returned – UK/Denmark/Netherlands – Dir: Mahdi Fleifel

Golden Bear for Best Short Film

Balada De Um Batráquio – Portugal – Dir: Leonor Teles

Best First Feature

Inhebbek Hedi – Tunisia/Belgium/France – Dir: Mohamed Ben Attia

Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution

Mark Lee Ping-Bing,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Berlinale ’16: The 66th Berlin Film Festival Award Winners

The 66th Berlin Film Festival has come to a close, and the winners of this year’s top awards have been announced.

Meryl Streep and her interbational jury took to the stage at the Berlinale Palast to dish out the awards in front of a packed auditorium.

The Golden Bear went to the superb documentary Fire At Sea, which is directed by Gianfranco Rosi, an outstanding film from Italy and France that focuses on a Mediterranean island, just 20km in diameter that impressed very early on in this year’s festival. The Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize went to Danis Tanovic’s Death In Sarajevo.

Golden Bear winner Fire At Sea

In terms of the acting prizes, Clive Owen presented the Silver Bear for Best Actor to Majd Mastoura for Inhebbek Hedi, and Meryl Streep handed the Best Actress award to Trine Dyrholm for her performance in the outstanding The Commune.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Gianfranco Rosi’s 'Fire at Sea' wins Berlin's Golden Bear

  • ScreenDaily
Gianfranco Rosi’s migrant documentary Fire At Sea (Fuocoammare) took home the Golden Bear for Best Film at the Berlin Film Festival, which handed out its competition awards on Saturday night.Click here for full list of winners

Italian-American Rosi - who won the Golden Lion in Venice for his documentary Sacro Gra in 2013 - spent months on the island of Lampedusa capturing the everyday lives of its 6,000-strong population.

Situated closer to Africa than Europe, the Italian island of Lampedusa is one of the first points of call for hundreds of thousands of African and Middle Eastern refugees and migrants hoping to make a new life in Europe.

The film was a critics favourite during the Berlinale, leading the Screen Jury Grid into the final weekend of the festival, however during an interview with Screen director Rosi admitted a fear that his film might divide viewers.

Fire At Sea proved a hot seller for Doc & Film
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin: ‘Fire at Sea’ Wins Golden Bear for Best Film

“Fire at Sea,” Gianfranco Rosi’s Italian documentary about the refugee crisis on the island of Lampedusa, won the 66th Berlin Film Festival’s Golden Bear for Best Film on Saturday.

The pic’s win came as no surprise. From the start of this year’s fest, taking place amidst the gravest refugee crisis facing Europe in modern history, the theme of displaced people, forced from their homes due to war, violence and economic necessity, has deeply defined the event.

“Fire at Sea” looks at the harrowing journeys undertaken by immigrants from Africa, the Middle East and Asia as they risk their lives to reach the Italian island of Lampedusa in the hopes of making it to mainland Europe.

“At this moment I have to think about all the people who did not survive the journey to Lampedusa,” Rosi said upon accepting the prize. “Lampedusa is a generous place. It is a place of fishermen,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin Film Festival 2016: Full list of winners

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin Film Festival 2016: Full list of winners
Documentary Fire At Sea wins Golden Bear; Death In Sarajevo wins Jury PrizeWinners of 66th Berlin International Film FestivalGolden Bear for Best Film

Fire At Sea (It-Fr), dir. Gianfranco Rosi

Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize

Death In Sarajevo (Fr-Bos), dir. Danis Tanovic

Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize

A Lullaby To The Sorrowful Mystery (Phil-Sing), dir. Lav Diaz

Silver Bear for Best Director

Mia Hansen-Love for Things To Come

Silver Bear for Best Actress

Trine Dyrholm in The Commune

Silver Bear for Best Actor

Majd Mastoura in Hedi

Silver Bear for Best Script

Tomasz Wasilewski for United States Of Love (Pol-Swe), dir. Tomasz Wasilewski

Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution

Mark Lee Ping-bing for cinematography of Crosscurrent (China), dir. Yang Chao

Best First Feature Award (€50,000)

Hedi (Tun-Bel-Fr), Mohamed Ben Attia

Golden Bear for Best Short Film

Batrachian’s Ballad (Balada de um Batráquio), Leonor Teles, Portugal

Berlin Short Film Nominee for the EFAs

A Man Returned, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Live: Berlinale 2016 winners

  • ScreenDaily
Live: Berlinale 2016 winners
The Golden and Silver Bears are set to be awarded shortly. Keep up with the latest here…

Refresh the page for the latest

Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize

Death In Sarajevo (Fr-Bos), dir. Danis Tanovic

Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize

A Lullaby To The Sorrowful Mystery (Phil-Sing), dir. Lav Diaz

Silver Bear for Best Director

Mia Hansen-Love for Things To Come

Silver Bear for Best Actress

Trine Dyrholm in The Commune

Silver Bear for Best Actor

Majd Mastoura in Hedi

Silver Bear for Best Script

Tomasz Wasilewski for United States Of Love (Pol-Swe), dir. Tomasz Wasilewski

Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution

Mark Lee Ping-bing for cinematography of Crosscurrent (China), dir. Yang Chao

Best First Feature Award (€50,000)

Hedi (Tun-Bel-Fr), Mohamed Ben Attia

Golden Bear for Best Short Film

Batrachian’s Ballad (Balada de um Batráquio), Leonor Teles, Portugal

Berlin Short Film Nominee for the EFAs

A Man Returned, Mahdi Fleifel (UK-Neth-Den)

Audi Short Film Award (€20,000)

Anchorage
See full article at ScreenDaily »

10th Asian Film Awards – Nominees 2016

In an online free live stream conference the Asian Film Award Academy announced the list of nominees for the 10th Asian Film Awards. The Assassin (Taiwan) by Hsiao-Hsien Hou lead the list with 9 nominations (Best Film, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Cinematography, Best Original Music, Best Costume Design, Best Production Design and Best Sound), Then comes Bajirao Mastani (India) by Sanjay Leela Bhansali (Best Film, Best Editing, Best Original Music, Best Costume Design and Best Visual Effects) and Port of Call (Hong Kong) by Philip Yung (Best Supporting Actress, Best Newcomer, Best Screenplay, Best Editing and Best Cinematography) with 5 nominations each. Mountains May Depart (China) by Jia Zhang Ke, Mr. Six (China) by Guan Hu and Veteran (South Korea) by Ryoo Seung-wan have 4 nominations each.

Best Film

The Assassin (Nie yin niang) by Hou Hsiao-Hsien

Hong Kong, China, Taiwan | 2015 Bajirao Mastani by Sanjay Leela Bhansali – India
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

'The Assassin' leads nods for Asian Film Awards

  • ScreenDaily
'The Assassin' leads nods for Asian Film Awards
Hou Hsiao-hsien’s The Assassin leads the nominations for the 10th Asian Film Awards with nine nods, followed by India’s Bajirao Mastani and Hong Kong’s Port Of Call with five apiece.

The Assassin, which won best director in Cannes last year, was nominated for best film, director, actress (Shu Qi), supporting actress (Zhou Yun), cinematography (Mark Lee Ping-bing) and four other technical categories.

Another sumptious period epic, Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Bajirao Mastani, was also nominated for best film, along with best editing, original music, costume design and visual effects.

Philip Yung’s social drama Port Of Call, based on the true story of a mainland prostitute who was murdered in Hong Kong, picked up nods for best supporting actor (Michael Ning), newcomer (Jessie Li), screenplay, editing and Christopher Doyle’s cinematography.

Rounding out the best film category are Jia Zhangke’s Mountains May Depart (France-China); Hashiguchi Ryosuke’s Three Stories Of Love (Japan
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Hong Kong-Asia Film Financing Forum unveils line-up

Wang Bing, Adam Wong, Pema Tseden and Lav Diaz (pictured) among directors with projects in line-up.Scoll down for full line-up

The 14th Hong Kong-Asia Film Financing Forum (Haf) (March 14-16) has revealed its full line-up of 31 projects, including new works from renowned filmmakers such as Wang Bing, Pema Tseden and Lav Diaz as well as from new talents.

Hong Kong is well-represented with five projects, including The Way We Dance director Adam Wong’s new project Trains In The Night; 2012 Hong Kong Film Awards best new director Jessey Tsang’s erotic feature The Lady Improper; and Dot 2 Dot director Amos Why’s adaptation of award-winning suspense novel Napping Kid.

Other Chinese-language projects from Taiwan and China include Taiwan actress Rene Liu’s directorial debut Lieutenant Yi, which will be produced by her regular collaborator Sylvia Chang; new director Huang Zi’s From Black And White To Shades Of Grey, produced by Monga
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Variety Critics Pick Their Oscar Nominees

Variety Critics Pick Their Oscar Nominees
Film critics, we’re often told, don’t vote for the Oscars — but if they did, here’s what at least three of their nomination ballots might look like. We listed our top five choices for best director, actor/actress, supporting actor/actress, original/adapted screenplay and cinematography. For best picture, we allowed ourselves 10 choices, based on the unlikely but theoretically possible outcome of 10 nominees in that category.

Because we chose from the full spectrum of studio, independent and foreign-language films released in the U.S. in 2015, it’s exceedingly unlikely that our selections will match or even resemble whatever the Academy comes up with on Jan. 15. And a good thing, too. Quality doesn’t limit itself to those movies with the marketing dollars to support a full-fledged Oscar campaign, and there are any number of worthy films and performances that Academy members — who are in the business of making movies,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Kristen Stewart Among National Society of Film Critics Winners! See Full List!

The National Society of Film Critics has announced the winners of their annual awards and Tom McCarthy's "Spotlight" emerged as the Best Picture winner! In the acting categories, Michael B. Jordan won Best Actor for "Creed" while the Best Actress award went to Charlotte Rampling for "45 Years."

Mark Rylance for "Bridge of Spies" took home the Best Supporting Actor trophy while Kristen Stewart for "Clouds of Sils Maria" won the Best Supporting Actress award! Way to go Kristen!

The National Society of Film Critics dedicated their meeting to pick the winners to the "late Richard Corliss, longtime critic at Time magazine, not just a writer of extraordinary intelligence, wit, and energy, but also a generous friend and colleague."

Here are the winners of the National Society of Film Critics awards (winners are bolded and includes the number of votes):

Best Actor:

*1. Michael B. Jordan (Creed) 29 points

Geza Rohrig
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Nsfc names 'Spotlight' best film of 2015

  • ScreenDaily
Nsfc names 'Spotlight' best film of 2015
The National Society Of Film Critics elected Tom McCarthy’s ensemble drama Best Picture of the Year 2015.

Michael B Jordan won best actor for Creed, Charlotte Rampling was named best actress for 45 Years and Todd Haynes won best director for Carol.

The 53-strong Society membership uses a weighted ballot system and held its 50th annual awards voting meeting on Sunday (Jan 3) at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Center as guests of the Film Society Of Lincoln Center.

Full results:

Best Actor

Michael B. Jordan (Creed) 29 pointsGeza Rohrig (Son Of Saul) 18Tom Courtenay (45 Years) 15

Best Actress

Charlotte Rampling (45 Years) 57Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn) 30Nina Hoss (Phoenix) 22

Best Supporting Actor

Mark Rylance (Bridge Of Spies) 56Michael Shannon (99 Homes) 16Sylvester Stallone (Creed) 14

Best Supporting Actress

Kristen Stewart (Clouds Of Sils Maria) 53Alicia Vikander (Ex Machina) 23Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs) 17

Elizabeth Banks (Love & Mercy) 17

Best Screenplay

Spotlight (Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy) 21Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman) 15

The Big Short (Charles Randolph, Adam McKay) 15

Cinematography
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Best Ensembles of 2015

After singling out the great breakthrough performances of the year, it’s time to turn our eyes to the ensembles. Whether it’s a small supporting role or the leading gig, the decisions of a casting director are vital to a project’s success. This year saw a number of flawless casting line-ups, from overlooked dramas to some of 2015’s most-celebrated films. Check out our list of ten favorites and let us know yours in the comments below.

The Assassin

The Assassin is first and foremost a film belonging to Shu QiHou Hsiao-hsien said as much when I interviewed him earlier this year — but a work of such lyricism requires more than one player. Because her Nie Yinniang floats over the film, always spoken of and most often appearing for the quick strike before receding, the fear that’s established by this picture’s co-stars — especially Chen Chang,
See full article at The Film Stage »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites