12 user 18 critic

The Hot Flashes (2013)

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A group of middle aged women play basketball and prove a point.



2 nominations. See more awards »





Cast overview, first billed only:
Kayla Rash
Laurence Humphrey
Millie Rash (as Jessica Rothenberg)
Jocelyn Humphrey
Coach Slaughter
Michal Anna Marble ...
Team Manager
Morrey McElroy ...
Nurse Morrey
Workshop Instructor
Larry Tausch ...
Square Dance Caller


An unlikely basketball team of unappreciated middle-aged Texas women, all former high school champs, challenge the current arrogant high school girls' state champs to a series of games to raise money for breast cancer prevention. Sparks fly as these marginalized women go to comic extremes to prove themselves on and off the court, and become a national media sensation. Written by Hennig, Brad

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Everyone thought their glory days were over. Everyone thought wrong. See more »


Comedy | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexual content and drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:



Official Sites:

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Release Date:

9 August 2013 (Spain)  »

Also Known As:

50 anni in rosa  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office


$4,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs


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Did You Know?


Melanie Griffith was originally attached to the film, but eventually backed out due to creative differences. See more »


The truck parks in the second spot in the church's parking lot. When they get out of the truck they are in the last spot. See more »

Crazy Credits

During the credits there are several outtakes and bloopers from the film. See more »


Referenced in Chelsea Lately: Episode #6.17 (2012) See more »


Hot Stuff
Written by Pete Bellotte, Harold Faltermeyer (as Harold Faltermeier) and Keith Forsey
Performed by Wanda Sykes and All Star Karaoke
Courtesy of AUDIOstream Karaoke
See more »

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User Reviews

This would've been subversive - or at least more serviceable - ten years ago
15 July 2013 | by See all my reviews

There is a sharp comic satire buried beneath the clichés and underwhelming effect Susan Seidelman's The Hot Flashes leaves on a viewer. Despite a capable directing effort on her part and the cast's evident enthusiasm for the material, this is a comedy that plays things safely and one that never is funnier than the idea of a basketball team called "The Hot Flashes." There's enough in the film to hold interest but not enough to cordially recommend.

The plot centers around Beth (Brooke Shields), a middle-aged woman currently going through menopause, and her family, made up of her husband (Eric Roberts) and her daughter. When Beth, who is known to take up numerous hobbies, however, not known to carry them out in a meaningful way, realizes that the local mammogram unit will be closing due to lack of financing on her part, she decides to form a basketball team called "The Hot Flashes" with several girls from her quiet Texas town named "Burning Bush." The goal in mind is for the team to play the championship school basketball team and raise $25,000 to save the mammogram unit.

As upsetting as this will be for some people to hear, the thematic idea that "women can do more than men" is hardly as subversive as it was so many years ago. While films should exist that show off a strong central female or more, having a film predicated off that idea and nothing more is beginning to become tiresome. The Hot Flashes even manages to downplay its central premise of menopause, offering little comedic or dramatic points about the inevitable, life-changing stage women must go through, only offering the redundant piece of optimism that despite menopausal setbacks they still have game.

I recently watched a film called Coffee Town, which was a simple, pleasant comedy centered around three characters who spend their days at the local cafe, using it as a free-office with Wi-Fi, coffee, and all the baked goods they need. While a tad vulgar, the film managed to disregard the idea that a film needs to be oppressively raunchy in order to be funny. The Hot Flashes does something similar to Coffee Town, which is make most of the characters possess wholesome morality, or at least a moral compass. Not to mention, their southern drawl is a sweet diversion from the city-slicking bawdiness that has been commonplace in cinema recently. And it's always nice to see a film maturely explore the reality of age as well as the optimistic way of looking at it.

But that doesn't excuse the idea that The Hot Flashes feels like Bridesmaids without a bite and that isn't because of the lack of language, sexual content, or gross-out humor. It's because Bridesmaids manages to try and make its characters come to life, using real-life situations and bittersweet reality. The characters in The Hot Flashes know they're getting older and there's no true reality to face since they're constantly reminding themselves they still have it. Not to mention, it doesn't help that the team itself is composed of the good mother, the sassy black lady, the chubby girl with the foul-mouthed, the town tramp, and the simple cowgirl.

Starring: Brooke Shields, Daryl Hannah, Virginia Madsen, Wanda Sykes, Eric Roberts, Mark Povinelli, and Camryn Manheim. Directed by: Susan Seidelman.

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