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The Devil's Cauldron, a city where depravity and violence has forged a society in which only the lethal and callous can survive, two young men who possess the intellect and ferocity to ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Kazu Patrick Tang ...
Mozart
...
Julius
...
Mary
...
Brutus
Guk Srisawat ...
Umiko
Stephen Thomas ...
Right Hand Man
...
Juliet
Sunanta Yousagoon ...
Anna Maria
Janissa Charoenrach ...
Young Umiko
...
Vinnie
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Brahim Achabbakhe ...
Josef
...
Markus
David Bueno ...
Trio 2
...
Brutus (voice)
Anton Kalinitchenko ...
Boris
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Storyline

The Devil's Cauldron, a city where depravity and violence has forged a society in which only the lethal and callous can survive, two young men who possess the intellect and ferocity to flourish, carve a name for themselves as the most efficient and unstoppable hit men. Side by side, these two brothers are the deadliest killers, feared by even the most evil criminals. But when a woman of rare beauty mysteriously enters the brother's lives she blinds them with her sweet promises and turns them against each other, resulting in an epic battle that threatens to bring the Devil's Cauldron to the brink of destruction. Written by Johan Kirsten

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Action

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31 October 2013 (Thailand)  »

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$3,400,000 (estimated)
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1.78 : 1
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Goofs

The three goons are all eager to be the first to attack Mozart and so play Rock-Paper-Scissors to see who gets the privilege. However, it is the loser of the game (the one Scissors against two Rocks) who goes first. See more »

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User Reviews

 
So bad it has to be seen to be believed...
17 April 2014 | by (Denmark) – See all my reviews

"Dragonwolf" was really a horrible experience to sit through. Not only because of its mediocre storyline, but more so because of the wooden and wooden acting and laughable dialogue all the way throughout the entire movie.

The story is about Mozart (played by Kazu Patrick Tang) whose mother dies when he is a boy, and Julius (played by Johan Kirsten) promises to look after him, essentially adopting him as a brother. As grown ups, the brothers are living on the shadier edge of the law, both having fallen for the same woman.

This movie takes place in Thailand, but for some odd reason everyone is speaking English throughout the movie, even Mozart's mom during the start of the movie. Having everyone speaking English didn't really help to make the movie any better.

I must confess that I have never seen as bad acting as I did in this movie from the guy who played the shaman and one of the goons (who were on the mountain with a binocular and saying that the woman was his project now) who worked for Julius. Wow, that was just horrible to bear witness to.

The one thing of the two things that this movie has working for it is the martial arts. There are some nice fighting scenes, although you can see that they are choreographed and rigidly executed, especially during many of the kicking scenes as they don't even try to hit one another. Despite having some fair action scenes and sequences throughout the movie, they could do nothing to lift up the movie, much less make the movie worthwhile.

And the second thing that works for the movie is the fighting and stunt talents of Kazu Patrick Tang.

Thai movies usually are nice, but of course, it would be ignorant to think that every single Thai movie will be great, and "Dragonwolf" is the testimony that proves the theory wrong. Boy was this a horrible movie.

And the movie ran for about 120 minutes, which was a painful length, because the movie was slow, dimwitted, dull and most often uneventful. "Dragonwolf" is not one of the prouder moments in Thai cinema. Should you be unfortunate to sit through and bear witness to this movie, trust me that you will soon forget about the movie once it finished (provided you make it to the end, of course), and you will not look back to make an additional viewing of this movie. I guarantee it.


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