6.5/10
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26 user 99 critic

Renoir (2012)

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Set on the French Riviera in the summer of 1915, Jean Renoir -- son of the Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste -- returns home to convalesce after being wounded in World War I. At his ... See full summary »

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(based on work by), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
3 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Coco Renoir
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Gabrielle
Michèle Gleizer ...
Aline Renoir
Laurent Poitrenaux ...
Pierre Renoir
Annelise Heimburger ...
La boulangère
Sylviane Goudal ...
La Grand'Louise
Solène Rigot ...
Madeleine
Emmanuelle Lepoutre ...
La Médecine
Carlo Brandt ...
Docteur Pratt
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Le brocanteur (as Thierry Hancisse de la Comédie Française)
Alice Barnole ...
Fille cabaret
Jean Adrien Espiasse ...
Aviateur cabaret 1 (as Jean-Adrien Espiasse)
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Storyline

Set on the French Riviera in the summer of 1915, Jean Renoir -- son of the Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste -- returns home to convalesce after being wounded in World War I. At his side is Andrée, a young woman who rejuvenates, enchants, and inspires both father and son. Written by Samuel Goldwyn Films

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sequences of art-related nudity and brief language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

2 January 2013 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Реноар  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$65,194 (USA) (29 March 2013)

Gross:

$2,291,047 (USA) (20 September 2013)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Official submission of France to the Oscars 2014 best foreign language film category. See more »

Goofs

The second time Renoir draws Andrée, after sending Coco/Claude away, the shot of Andree topless goes back and forth, each time her hair changes from draped over her front to behind her back. It is so obvious it's hard to believe anyone missed it. See more »

Quotes

Jean Renoir: If you told me what you wanted...
Pierre-Auguste Renoir: You can't explain a painting, you have to feel it. Go see Titian's courtesans at the Louvre. If those don't make you want to caress them, then you've understood nothing at all.
[Jean leaves]
Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Where are you going?
Jean Renoir: To the Louvre!
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Connections

References The Exploits of Elaine (1914) See more »

Soundtracks

No time blues
By Patrick Artero and Philippe Baudouin
Performed by Patrick Artero and Philippe Baudouin
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User Reviews

 
A gorgeous movie!
7 June 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is without question one of the most beautiful movies I have ever seen. The photography, especially the scenes outdoors, looks like one early Renoir painting after the next. The colors are vivid and lush, and the greens are varied to the nth degree. You could watch this movie with the sound turned off and still have a great time.

Which is not to say that the script and acting are not worth paying attention to. The story is nothing special: During the last years of his life, during World War I, Renoir lived in the South of France, to avoid the German invaders. There he paints a beautiful young woman, whom we get to see in the altogether rather often, to pleasing effect. (The movie never explores the extent to which this has an erotic aspect for Renoir, but since it is made clear that he ended up sleeping with his previous models, we can assume that. He is not just painting rose and pink. He keeps emphasizing that he is painting flesh.) His middle son, Jean (who will be the famous French film director down the road), comes home from the war on sick leave and eventually falls in love with the new model. That doesn't go particularly well, as she doesn't seem very committed to monogamy with him.

The youngest son, Claude (named after Monet), doesn't deal well with his Mother's recent death, or his distant relationship with Renoir. That doesn't get explored very deeply either.

So, in effect, the story threads are handled very Impressionistically as well: little touches of them here and there, but no detailed analysis.

The music is often very beautiful, so don't turn off the sound.

Don't expect great drama here. The acting is all fine, but there are no in-depth character portraits here - as there are not in Renoir's paintings - and no real drama. It is all very impressionistic, and often in a very beautiful way.

See this in a theater if you can. I suspect it will lose a lot reduced to even a 64" TV screen.

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I just saw it for a second time, this time on my 46" TV screen. Yes, it does lose a lot, but the color and light are still beautiful. It's a must see movie, but as I wrote before, don't expect much in the way of drama.


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