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Renoir (2012)

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Set on the French Riviera in the summer of 1915, Jean Renoir -- son of the Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste -- returns home to convalesce after being wounded in World War I. At his ... See full summary »

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(based on work ''Le tableau amoureux' by), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
3 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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...
...
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Gabrielle
Michèle Gleizer ...
Aline Renoir
Laurent Poitrenaux ...
Anne-Lise Heimburger ...
La boulangère (as Annelise Heimburger)
Sylviane Goudal ...
La Grand'Louise
Solène Rigot ...
Madeleine
Emmanuelle Lepoutre ...
La Médecine
Carlo Brandt ...
Docteur Pratt
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Le brocanteur (as Thierry Hancisse de la Comédie Française)
Alice Barnole ...
Fille cabaret
Jean Adrien Espiasse ...
Aviateur cabaret 1 (as Jean-Adrien Espiasse)
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Storyline

Set on the French Riviera in the summer of 1915, Jean Renoir -- son of the Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste -- returns home to convalesce after being wounded in World War I. At his side is Andrée, a young woman who rejuvenates, enchants, and inspires both father and son. Written by Samuel Goldwyn Films

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sequences of art-related nudity and brief language | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

2 January 2013 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Реноар  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$65,194, 31 March 2013, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$2,291,047, 22 September 2013
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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Official submission of France to the Oscars 2014 best foreign language film category. See more »

Goofs

The second time Renoir draws Andrée, after sending Coco/Claude away, the shot of Andree topless goes back and forth, each time her hair changes from draped over her front to behind her back. It is so obvious it's hard to believe anyone missed it. See more »

Quotes

Pierre-Auguste Renoir: You want to make yourself useful? Go put a necklace on her. Take the emerald one.
Jean Renoir: [approaches a posing Andree] The boss wants you to wear this.
Andrée Heuschling: No introduction first?
Jean Renoir: Forgive me.
Andrée Heuschling: You're Jean? I saw a painting of you.
Jean Renoir: I saw a painting of you, too.
Andrée Heuschling: He always makes me too fat.
Jean Renoir: He makes me look like a girl.
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Connections

References The Exploits of Elaine (1914) See more »

Soundtracks

Shimmy Dédée
By Patrick Artero
Performed by Patrick Artero, Philippe Baudouin, Francis Guero, André Neufert and Michel Queraud
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User Reviews

 
sumptuous story of painter and filmmaker son
23 January 2013 | by See all my reviews

+Renoir (France, 2012, 112 min)

Gille +Bourdos uses the well-known stories of the painter father Pierre-Auguste and the filmmaker son Jean Renoir for a film that is at once breathtaking spectacle and a profound anatomy of the impulses and values of art. The film was one of my highlights at this year's +Palm Springs International Film Festival.

The plot presents the 74-year-old veteran painter (Michel Bouquet) and his ravishing new 15-year-old model, Andree Heuschling (Christa Theret) enjoying their opulent country estate while WW I pounds the humanity outside. Mark Lee Ping-Bin shoots the interiors with classic Dutch light and shadow but the exteriors in the unbridled luminosity of Impressionism. Here Renoir explains that structure comes from colour, not form, and he refuses to use black. That summarizes the painter's Impressionism: it finds reality in what he makes of the outside world, not what it firmly may be. His swirls of rosy chub continues his celebration of the young "velvet" flesh, despite the war's flensing and destruction of the flesh beyond the estate and his age's grotesque gnarl and ruin of his bones. His painting days, like his valiant denial of death, are limited.

Son Jean (Vincent Rottiers) returns from the front with a symbol of the reality his father rejects: an open wound. The family has a variety of open wounds, from the loss of the boys' mother and the favoured model/nanny Gabrielle to the sons' resentment of their father's aloofness. The cut to the bone represents the reality Renoir's fleshy ladies and painted pommes reject. Vincent's convalescence goes beyond the flesh gap to include winning Andree, who -- a closing title tells us -- married him, starred in many films (as Catherine Hessling), and after their split died alone in poverty. The sins of the father don't just visit the son but move in with him.

The tension between the painter's idealized flesh and the its horrific reality are frequently imaged, especially in the eating scenes and in the kitchen where a maid delicately peels a tomato, removing a hide to expose a succulent flesh. The hanging carrion are an implicit reminder of the hunting and killing of the human prey outside. Renoir pere screams from the nightmares he doesn't have his sunshine, models and pink paints to ward off.

Around the story of Renoir pere beats a more subtle story of Renoir fils. Like Andree, the film serves both father and son. Unobtrusively Bourdos weaves in the specific sources of Renoir's cinema. These include his sense that wars shatter natural cross-border fraternities, the harshness of the class prejudices, the increasing disrespect for culture, the necessity for art. Even the quintessential understanding which will become "The terrible thing is, everyone has his reasons." For more see www.yacowar.blogspot.


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