The Union of Socialist Soviet Republics (USSR) is the largest geographically unbroken political unit in the world, covering one-sixth of the world's land mass. The people are a determined ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
James A. FitzPatrick ...
Himself - Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

The Union of Socialist Soviet Republics (USSR) is the largest geographically unbroken political unit in the world, covering one-sixth of the world's land mass. The people are a determined lot, stemming from the memory of breaking free from czarist rule and the emerging Soviet regime going through its growing pains. The Communist government's regulations do not allow for profit, and everything is owned and controlled by the state. Most of the agricultural goods produced are exchanged for military hardware, leaving little food for the people, who must stand in long queues to receive what little is available. However, the government provided for equality among the sexes and strove to end illiteracy with education being mandatory for children. There also is a certain freedom and liberation to the lives of the people, for who pride in work is glorified and celebrated in service to the state. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Documentary | Short

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

26 December 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A FitzPatrick Miniature: People of Russia  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)
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Connections

Edited from Moscow, Heart of Soviet Russia (1932) See more »

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My Enemy's Enemy Is My Friend
12 January 2014 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This Jame A. Fitzpatrick Traveltalk from 1942 looks like a standard example of the series, except for two things: first, it has no Technicolor photography. Instead, it is composed of black and white newsreel clips from ten years earlier. Second, Fitzpatrick's usual peppy drivel is not about the charming oddities that might make a tourist want to visit. Instead, it is about the glories of the Soviet government, the shameful drosky drivers who are remnants of feudalism, the children placed in "youth colonies" to be rescued from the "ignorance of their mothers" and the end, which extols the glories of Joseph Stalin.

Fitzgerald never had a bad word to say on screen about any place; he also ran a travel agency. Nonetheless, this one looks absolutely bizarre and can only be explained in the context of World War Two propaganda. It shows clearly that Mr. Fitzpatrick was not about pretty pictures of exotic locales. He was about sticking to the script, no matter what the words were.


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