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People of Russia (1942)

The Union of Socialist Soviet Republics (USSR) is the largest geographically unbroken political unit in the world, covering one-sixth of the world's land mass. The people are a determined ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Himself - Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

The Union of Socialist Soviet Republics (USSR) is the largest geographically unbroken political unit in the world, covering one-sixth of the world's land mass. The people are a determined lot, stemming from the memory of breaking free from czarist rule and the emerging Soviet regime going through its growing pains. The Communist government's regulations do not allow for profit, and everything is owned and controlled by the state. Most of the agricultural goods produced are exchanged for military hardware, leaving little food for the people, who must stand in long queues to receive what little is available. However, the government provided for equality among the sexes and strove to end illiteracy with education being mandatory for children. There also is a certain freedom and liberation to the lives of the people, for who pride in work is glorified and celebrated in service to the state. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Documentary | Short

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

26 December 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A FitzPatrick Miniature: People of Russia  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)
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Connections

Edited from Leningrad, the Gateway to Soviet Russia (1932) See more »

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User Reviews

FitzPatrick Non-TravelTalks
7 May 2012 | by See all my reviews

People of Russia (1943)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Cheaply made but entertaining short from director James A. FitzPatrick takes a look at the people of Russia as we learn why they're so strong and kept the USSR from falling apart over the years. Throughout the 10-minute running time we're told various stories about the Russian people including how all the children are taken into special schools to make sure everyone, no matter their sex, is able to read. They also talk about how equality is a major issue there and how work is glorified by all. If you see the title of this and notice FitzPatrick then you'd obviously think that this was another TravelTalks entry but it's not. This is a separate project and since WWII was going on that probably explains why all the footage from this was shot in the early 30s. This adds a rather cheap feel to the picture but I think the stories told are entertaining enough to keep one interesting in the movie. It's should also be noted that the film is in B&W and it appears that some of the footage was taken from a silent movie or two.


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