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The House I Live In
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The House I Live In (2012) More at IMDbPro »

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The House I Live In -- An investigative look at America's war on drugs and its impact on the criminal justice system, with a focus on the experiences of Nannie Jeter, a former employee of filmmaker Eugene Jarecki's family.
The House I Live In -- Trailer for The House I Live In

Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Eugene Jarecki
Christopher St John (additional writing)
Contact:
View company contact information for The House I Live In on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 October 2012 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
In the past 40 years, the War on Drugs has accounted for 45 million arrests, made America the world's largest jailer, and destroyed impoverished communities at home and abroad. See more »
Plot:
From the dealer to the narcotics officer, the inmate to the federal judge, a penetrating look inside America's criminal justice system, revealing the profound human rights implications of U.S. drug policy. | Add synopsis »
Awards:
3 wins See more »
User Reviews:
The Slow-Motion Holocaust See more (17 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Eugene Jarecki ... Himself, narrator, interviewer (voice)
Nannie Jeter ... Herself
Betty Chism ... Herself
Dennis Whidbee ... Himself
Elzie Hooks ... Himself, inmate, Lexington Correctional Center
Robert Wilson ... Himself

David Simon ... Himself, journalist
Michael Correa ... Himself
Gabor Mate ... Himself
Charles Bowden ... Himself
Mark W. Bennet ... Himself, judge, Northern District of Iowa
Maurice Haltiwanger ... Himself
Jim K. McGough ... Himself, Maurice Haltiwanger's defense attorney
Eric Franklin ... Himself, warden, Lexington Correctional Center
Don Walker ... Himself, inmate, Lexington Correctional Center
Larry Kastner ... Himself, inmate, Lexington Correctional Center
Mike Carpenter ... Himself, chief of security, Lexington Correctional Center
Michelle Alexander ... Herself

Charles Ogletree ... Himself
Anthony Johnson ... Himself
Jonathan Kaufman ... Himself
Mark Mauer ... Himself
David Steele ... Himself, instructor, Lexington Correctional Center
David Kennedy ... Himself
Richard Lawrence Miller ... Himself, historian (as Richard Miller)
Julius Wilson ... Himself
Carl Hart ... Himself, associate professor of psychology, Columbia University

Michael Bien ... Himself
Julie Stewart ... Herself, president, Families Against Mandatory Minimums
William Walter Wilkins ... Himself, federal judge (as William Wilkins)
Kevin Ott ... Himself, inmate, Lexington Correctional Center

Directed by
Eugene Jarecki 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Eugene Jarecki 
Christopher St John  additional writing

Produced by
Roy Ackerman .... executive producer
David Alcaro .... executive producer
Joslyn Barnes .... executive producer
Sam Cullman .... producer
Daniel DiMauro .... archival producer
Kathleen Fournier .... co-producer
Nick Fraser .... executive producer
Danny Glover .... executive producer
Christopher St John .... producer
Alexandra Johnes .... consulting producer
Shirel Kozak .... co-producer
John Legend .... executive producer
Brad Pitt .... executive producer
Melinda Shopsin .... lead producer
Russell Simmons .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Robert Miller 
 
Cinematography by
Sam Cullman (director of photography)
Derek Hallquist (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Paul Frost 
 
Production Design by
Joe Posner 
 
Production Management
Kara Elverson .... production manager
 
Sound Department
Eric Di Stefano .... post-audio assistant
Christopher Koch .... sound mixer
Randy Matuszewski .... post-audio assistant
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Matt Boyd .... additional camera
Sam Cullman .... camera operator
Joe di Gennaro .... additional camera
Christopher Frierson .... additional camera
Robert Hatch-Miller .... additional camera
Taylor Krauss .... additional camera
Taylor Krauss .... camera operator
Christopher LI .... additional camera
Joe Posner .... additional camera
Étienne Sauret .... additional camera
David Sperling .... additional camera
Christopher St. John .... additional camera
Rob VanAlkemade .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
Simon Barker .... additional editing
Daniel DiMauro .... additional editing
Benjamin Murray .... colorist
Anoosh Tertzakian .... additional editing: first assistant editor
 
Music Department
John McCullough .... music supervisor
 
Other crew
Claudia Becker .... key advisor
Joe Beirne .... technical supervisor
Meg Charlton .... researcher
Nora Colie .... researcher
Ben Cortes .... production assistant
Daniel DiMauro .... head researcher
Edward Eglin .... creative consultant
Kara Elverson .... field correspondent
Sophia Figuereo .... production assistant
Kathleen Fournier .... field correspondent
Akil Gibbons .... production assistant
Nora Jaccaud .... creative consultant
Shirel Kozak .... researcher
Patrick O'Brien .... researcher
Dana O'Keefe .... sales agent
Melinda Shopsin .... field correspondent
Julia Simpson .... researcher
Christopher St. John .... field correspondent
Christopher St. John .... researcher
Robert Stein .... counsel: e & o
Anoosh Tertzakian .... researcher
Brendan Zoltowski .... production assistant
 
Thanks
Mary Clark .... thanks
Andrew Jarecki .... special thanks
Melvin Van Peebles .... thanks
 

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Additional Details

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Runtime:
USA:108 min
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24 out of 27 people found the following review useful.
The Slow-Motion Holocaust, 11 November 2012
Author: winst from United States

If you've been a student of most public schools you've learned about slavery.

There's a lyric I remember that says "I hate it when they tell us how far we came to be - as if our peoples' history started with slavery." Well, the history of subjugating minorities has not ENDED with slavery either, and retrospective condemnation of racism serves the purpose to perpetuate the racism embedded and invested in our country today.

The most important mistake is to confuse failure with success in regards to the apparent shortcomings of our establishment. I again use the example of public schools because the recent documentary "Waiting for Superman" did a fantastic job in addressing the "failures" of schools to educate children. It takes a book like James Lowen's Lies My Teacher Told Me to recognize the grand success of our school's indoctrination process: to teach obedience, not intelligence. It takes a documentary like The House I Live In to vocalize the airtight success of our administration in conducting the 41 years' drug war.

Logic should compute. If more money has been spent (a trillion dollars since the '70s,) the prison population has skyrocketed (2.4 million people incarcerated) and no progress has been made in keeping drugs off the streets, (similarly with our schools, with reform after reform we continue to perform beneath the feet of most industrialized countries,) you have to start looking at things a little differently. It is hard to see the exit of the maze when walking within its walls. This documentary helps to see things from the outside.

This film brings to light a lot of revealing facts that have been swept under the rug, like how opium wasn't an issue until Chinese started climbing the success latter in San Francisco, or how the police in border states can directly siphon the money from drug busts to reward their outfit. Mostly, it encourages a comparison between the way minorities have been apprehended with drug abuse and the apprehension of whites (who hold equal if not higher drug abuse statistics but make up a minority of the prison population.) And it encourages comparison between past, mass scale subjugation (often with eventual extermination) and, to quote the film, the slow-motion holocaust happening in our own country.

It recognizes the drug epidemic as an economic issue and a medical issue, not a racial issue. It recognizes the drug WAR as the glaring rash of vibrant racism, and the brutal front of a class war in a society where profits come first, human beings second. More to this point, it eludes to the country's prime motivation, net gain and increased GDP, and the plethora of companies from Sprint Mobile to GM to privatized prisons such as CCA, all of whom depend on the drug war to maintain stock value.

To quote ousted investigative journalist and ex-LAPD narcotics officer Michael Ruppert, "A snake eating its own tail is not nutritious."

Though it is outside the periphery of the film's focus and beyond the pale even for a documentary of this substance, the issue of international drug trafficking, and facilitation it has received, at times, from both the financial sector and intelligence agency of our country, was never brought to light in this film. Despite whether this topic is to be written off as conspiracy theory or submitted for further analysis, a film that introduces our economy's dependence on drug dependence and the targeting of minorities in an everlasting drug war, has a duty to at least address the controversy. I suggest raising the question on discussion boards and at Q&As, as my screening was lucky enough to have.

We live in a country that is infested with racism, now as much as any other time. Our economy depends on it, and the drug war has fertilized it. It is time to end it.

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