Bestiaire (2012) - News Poster

(2012)

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New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

  • Indiewire
New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist
See full article at Indiewire »

Locarno Film Review: ‘A Skin So Soft’

Locarno Film Review: ‘A Skin So Soft’
The English title for “A Skin So Soft” makes Denis Côté’s docu-hybrid sound like an ad for Avon’s bath oil/bug repellent, which is a shame since “soft” isn’t the word that comes to mind when looking at the over-pumped muscles of the Canadian bodybuilders featured here. The French title, which translates as “your skin so smooth,” makes more sense, especially given a scene in which Jean-François Bouchard appears to be undergoing a painful depilation. Smooth, bulging, oiled, tatted, exposed: The subjects of Côté’s fascination with this extreme form of self-creation project a hyper-charged masculinity that’s undercut by rituals traditionally associated with femininity, from make-up and bronzers to the whole act of displaying one’s body for admiration.

Côté doesn’t emphasize this dichotomy (or is it a paradox?); true to his admirably eclectic approach, the maverick director weaves together portraits of six bodybuilders that push to the margins personal details and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Canada’s Most Singular Filmmaker Will Never Go to Hollywood — AFI Fest

  • Indiewire
Why Canada’s Most Singular Filmmaker Will Never Go to Hollywood — AFI Fest
The current crop of acclaimed Quebec filmmakers shooting feature films south of the border speaks to an unprecedented infatuation on Hollywood’s part with French-Canadian directors.

Among the heavy hitters: Jean-Marc Vallée (“Wild,” “The Dallas Buyers Club,” HBO’s upcoming “Big Little Lies”), Philippe Falardeau (“The Bleeder,” “The Good Lie”), Denis Villeneuve (“Arrival,” “Sicario,” the forthcoming “Blade Runner” sequel), not to mention Xavier Dolan, who’s currently shooting his star-studded English-language debut, “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan.”

But there’s another remarkably prolific, genre-bending Montreal filmmaker – an award-winning festival regular who has clocked in nine features, one medium-length production and shorts to spare over the last decade – who’s never shown much enthusiasm about dipping his toes in the American studio system. No matter how many prizes or festival selections his films rack up (Berlin, Cannes, Locarno and Sundance among them) or how many retrospectives film societies program about his work,
See full article at Indiewire »

Venice Critics’ Week to open with Alice Lowe revenge-comedy

Venice Critics’ Week to open with Alice Lowe revenge-comedy
The strand will be bookended by Alice Lowe’s Prevenge and Xander Robin’s Are We Not Cats [pictured].Scroll down for line-up

The Venice International Film Festival’s (Aug 31 - Sept 10) 2016 Critics’ Week line-up has been revealed.

The independent section of the festival – dedicated to features from debut directors – includes seven titles from five continents.

Opening the strand with be UK director Alice Lowe’s Prevenge (out of competition), which stars Lowe as a pregnant woman on a killing spree and will have its world premiere at the festival.

Lowe was co-writer and co-star of Ben Wheatley’s Sightseers. The film is a Western Edge Pictures/Gennaker production and was shot in Wales last year.

Closing will be Xander Robin’s Are We Not Cats, which was one of three genre titles to screen as a work-in-progress at the Cannes Marche this year as part of an inaugural partnership between genre market Frontières and the Cannes Film Festival
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #46. Denis Côté’s Boris Sans Beatrice

  • ioncinema
Boris Sans Beatrice

Director: Denis Côté

Writer: Denis Côté

French Canadian auteur Denis Côté fluctuates steadily between feature films and documentary, tending to win critical acclaim in either category. After winning Best Director at Locarno in 2008 for All That She Wants and again in 2011 for Curling he went to Sundance with the 2012 documentary Bestiaire and then scooped up the Alfred Bauer Award in Berlin for Vic+Flo Saw a Bear (2013). His latest, Boris Sans Beatrice concerns businessman Boris Malinovsky, who falls into a spiritual and moral funk when visited by a mysterious stranger (the enigmatic Denis Lavant).

Cast: James Hyndman, Denis Lavant, Simone-Elise Girard

Production Co./Producers: Metafilms’ Sylvain Corbeil & Nancy Grant (Mommy)

U.S. Distributor: Rights Available. Tbd (domestic). Films Boutique (international).

Release Date: Cote will be competing in competition at the 2016 Berlin Film Festival.
See full article at ioncinema »

2014 Wndx Festival of Moving Image: Official Lineup

The 9th annual Wndx Festival of Moving Image will showcase new experimental media from all over the world — including short films, installations and live cinematic performances — at several locations across the city of Winnipeg on September 24-28.

Special events at Wndx this year include the fest’s annual One Take Super 8 Event, where 30 filmmakers will screen their in-camera edited masterpieces for the first time along with the audience. Plus, there’s a two-part celebration of the work of Denis Côté, featuring his two films Joy of Man’s Desiring and Bestiaire, with the filmmaker in attendance.

There will also be a live film performance by filmamker Karl Lemieux with sound artists Roger Tellier-Craig and Alexandre St-Onge; and Freya Björg Olafson’s dance/film hybrid HYPER_.

Short films to be on the lookout throughout the fest include Mike Olenick‘s Red Luck, which won the Best Looking Film award at the
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Vic + Flo Saw A Bear | DVD Review

  • ioncinema
Squeezed between his lavishly received, Sundance preemed docu-portrait of zoo life in Bestiaire, and Joy of Man’s Desiring, a genre blending meditation on factory work which had its debut at this year’s Berlin Film Festival, Canadian auteur Denis Côté took home the Alfred Bauer Award from the Berlinale last year for his latest work of intricately haunting fiction, Vic + Flo Saw A Bear. It seems the stark visual sense found in Côté’s documentary work has carried over to his latest narrative. Squarely framed against spare backdrops within the rural cabin they’ve shacked up in, Pierrette Robitaille and Romane Bohringer, who play middle-aged lesbian ex-con couple Vic and Flo, respectively, are trying their hand at the monotony of a normal life, but sooner than later they swiftly find that they can not for all their efforts escape the horrors of one’s past.

Côté’s interests lie
See full article at ioncinema »

Joy of Man’s Desiring | 2014 Hot Docs Review

  • ioncinema
All Work and No Play Makes Côté Toy With Factory Observation

After a sultry opening monologue from a mystery woman that resonates with a statement that ‘Everything has a price. Not always money’, Denis Côté’s latest erupts in an anxiety inducing symphony of rhythmic industrialization, the pounding and clanging increasing in both proximity and volume as the camera slowly dollies in on a montage of machinery in operation. It is this harsh repetitiveness of mechanization and it’s mixed relationship with the people that engage with it that Joy of Man’s Desiring manages to encapsulate, the human cost of mass consumer factory production.

Excluding the various to-camera portrait shots and lyrical anecdotes that are increasingly sprinkled throughout, much of the film feels akin to the output of the rising stars of Harvard’s Sensory Ethnology Lab. Mixing its focus of physical labor a-la Leviathan with the stringent observation of Manakamana and Sweetgrass,
See full article at ioncinema »

Interview with Vic + Flo Saw a Bear Director Denis Côté

Quebecois filmmaker Denis Côté makes an unassuming, unabashedly regional kind of cinema, drawing on the rhythms and landscapes of his native province. It’s taken him a long time to get attention south of the border – I had to travel to the Toronto Film Festival to see his first film, Drifting States. He seemed to have a breakthrough of sorts in the U.S. with Curling, which at least got some attention on the festival circuit and was acquired by New Yorker Films, who never released it. Bestiaire, a semi-documentary shot in a Montreal zoo, got him more attention, and Vic […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Vic + Flo Saw a Bear (2013 AFI Fest review)

Vic + Flo Saw a Bear could best be called a nervous drama. Not quite plot-driven enough to be confused with a conventional thriller, this tense character study from French-Canadian filmmaker Denis Côté (Bestiaire) leaves us feeling that something ominous is about ready to happen at any moment. The anxiety of that moment’s arrival hangs heavy, and when Côté finally delivers his payoff, it’s considerably disturbing—but it’s almost something of a relief, as well. At least the gnawing anticipation has finally subsided....
See full article at PasteMagazine »

Opening: Bestiaire Examines The Nature Of Gaze

With his new narrative feature Vic+Flo Saw a Bear playing at this years Berlinale (read Twitch review here) and snatching the Alfred Bauer Prize/Silver Bear, the adventurous Québécois film critic turned director Denis Côté's intriguing little documentary Bestiaire gets a one-week theatrical run at Cinefamily in Los Angeles, February 19-27, after making the rounds at various film festivals (Sundance, Tiff, Canadian Front) last year. The documentary starts in an art class, where a group of students is sketching an inanimate object. They stare at the object intently. The whole sequence is tense and serious. It turns out that the object is a stuffed deer (or is it a baby antelope?). We are looking at the spectators looking at their subjects. Then we move on to...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Vic and Flo Saw a Bear (Vic et Flo ont vu un ours) | Review - Berlinale 2013

Those of us who saw Denis Côté’s latest brilliant documentary Bestiaire (which had its premiere at Berlinale 2012) definitely should see the Canadian director's newest feature film, Vic and Flo Saw a Bear. If you weren’t one of the lucky ones and did not have opportunity to watch the doc it would be good to, at least, imagine it. From what I’ve heard, the people who saw Vic and Flo... without prior knowledge of Bestiaire had a more than slightly different experience during the screening -- more or less, they were bored. Yet, they could have been blown away if they only knew that Côté is looking at his two main heroines exactly the same way he captures the animals in Bestiaire. He puts his camera in one place and lets the animals wander back and forth. The images that found his camera during the shooting time (I
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Berlin Film Festival 2013: 'Vic and Flo Saw a Bear' review

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ Denis Côté's Vic and Flo Saw a Bear ( Vic et Flo ont vu un ours, 2013) is the follow-up to the experimental French Canadian director's zoo doc, Bestiaire (2012). A detached and ultimately soulless portrayal of the rehabilitating limbo of post-prison reintegration, Côté's offbeat and darkly comic drama is a near-impenetrable enigma of a film. We meet Vic (Pierrette Robitaille) as she arrives at an isolated bus stop, where she encounters two young boys, one of whom plays her an off-tune rendition of Farrah Shamek on his shabby-looking trumpet. She refuses to pay him anything for his rotten performance, yet the boys can't quite understand why.

Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

DVD Release: Bestiaire

  • Disc Dish
DVD Release Date: Feb. 19, 2013

Price: DVD $29.99

Studio: KimStim/Zeitgeist

The eyes have it in Denis Côté's Bestiaire.

The 2012 documentary film Bestiaire is a unique cinematic examination on humans’ fascination with animals

Directed by Denis Côté, Bestiaire offers a mesmerizing meditation on the relationships between animals and people as seen through multiple seasons at a Quebec safari park. A deceptively simple visual essay about the act of looking, the film lacks a traditional narrative as it blurs the line between observer and observed. Still, there is a sense of dramatic tension in each of the film’s carefully framed shots: a cage door under attack from a growling lion; the scurrying striped legs of zebras in a pen; the long stare of a bull, straight into camera.

Directed by Canadian filmmaker Denis Côté, the striking and contemplative Bestiaire, a example of “pure cinema’ if ever there was one, was recently
See full article at Disc Dish »

5 Broken Cameras Wins Best Doc at 2013 Cinema Eye Honors

  • ioncinema
Sorry Oscars. But after the Indie Spirit Awards, the number two spot in terms of Award Season importance are the Cinema Eye Honors. Seems like it was only yesterday when Aj Schnack & Thom Powers teamed up for one basic, logical concept: an event that would reward yearly output of documentary film in a rightfully sound manner. With the wind in their sails, the 6th annual edition was held last night and deservingly so, adding to its double wins at the Idfa and Sundance, it is 5 Broken Cameras that took the top honors for Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking. Co-directed by Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi – political activism via you guessed it, five video cameras. The film was released via Kino Lorber.

The night’s only double winner, could be regarded as the silver medal doc film of the year: Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s Detropia grabbed the Outstanding
See full article at ioncinema »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Films of 2013: #97. Denis Coté’s Vic & Flo ont vu un ours

  • ioncinema
Vic & Flo ont vu un ours

Director/Writer: Denis Côté

Producer(s): Metafilms’ Sylvain Corbeil, Stéphanie Morissette (Camion)

U.S. Distributor: Rights Available

Cast: Marc-André Grondin, Romane Bohringer, Marie Brassard, Pierrette Robitaille

Ever since his docu-like essay in 2005′s Les états nordiques, Denis Côté has treated us to a body of minimalist work that defies classification with his last item Bestiaire (Sundance, Tiff) best exemplifying his preference for unique observational points and for fringe characters (this case it’s animals, but his other films are populated with the exotic of the human kind). While his 7th film is looking to be his most accessible yet (in the realms of Curling), which comparatively means its still counter-flow to the norm, this will surely have dna from his previous films (offbeat characters enclosed in natural spaces).

Gist: This is the portrait of two recently released prisoners (Pierrette Robitaille and Romane Bohringer
See full article at ioncinema »

The Master Takes Tops Honors With Toronto Film Critics!

The Toronto Film Critics Association blessed Paul Thomas Anderson's film The Master with four awards this year. And three very different Canadian films have the chance to win the Rogers Best Canadian Film Award: Bestiaire, directed by Denis CôtéGoon, directed by Michael Dowse, and Stories We Tell, directed by Sarah Polley. That makes it two documentaries and a hockey movie that tapped into the Canadian psyche like a Maple tree at the end of Winter. Other titles and acting talent familiar to Twitch readers will also receive awards at the January 8th gala. See the full press release below to find out who they are.The Tfca honours Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master with four awardsBESTIAIRE, Goon and Stories We Tell compete for Rogers $100,000 Best Canadian Film Award Toronto -- The Master, Paul...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

"The Imposter," "Searching for Sugar Man" Lead Cinema Eye Nominations!

"The Imposter" and "Searching for Sugar Man" each received 5 nods from the Cinema Eye Honors for Nonfiction Filmmaking. 31 features and 5 shorts will vie for the best of the best in documentary filmmaking. Check out the full list of nominees below including the Audience Award and Heterodox Award.

Winners of the 6th Annual Cinema Eye Honors will be announced on January 9, 2013 as Cinema Eye returns for a third year to New York City.s Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens.

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking

5 Broken Cameras

Directed by Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi

Produced by Christine Camdessus, Serge Gordey, Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi

Detropia

Directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady

Produced by Heidi Ewing, Rachel Grady and Craig Atkinson

The Imposter

Directed by Bart Layton

Produced by Dimitri Doganis

Marina Abramović The Artist is Present

Directed by Matthew Akers

Produced by Jeff Dupre and Maro Chermayeff
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Best Documentaries of 2012 (Part One)

Once considered by many as either high art, propaganda or educational videos, documentary film has developed into a popular and visible form of entertainment, sometimes breaking into the mainstream, and often having a greater effect on society. Every year it seems more and more docs are produced and thus not even our hard working staff can manage to get around to watching them all. But we try our best, and so every year we publish a list of the docs that received high praise from our team. This year, the films appearing range from poetic, semi-expository, strictly observational, participatory, reflexive and even groundbreaking. Here are the 20 best documentaries of 2012, list in alphabetical order, with one special mention. Enjoy!

****

5 Broken Cameras

Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi

5 Broken Cameras is a cinematic achievement, a homemade movie and an extraordinary work of political activism. Co-directed by Palestinian Emad Burnat and Israeli Guy Davidi,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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