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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012

1-20 of 43 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Oscar Race at the 2016 Halfway Mark: Diversity and Confusion

24 June 2016 11:03 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As 2016 hits the halfway point, the Oscar race is even fuzzier than usual. Two things are clear: The studios are back-loading their awards hopefuls yet again, with launches at fall festivals and/or the fourth quarter; and there are more diverse films in the mix, with at least 16 potential biggies from filmmakers who are women, Asians, Latino-Hispanics, black and seniors (i.e., over 65).

In the past few years, “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Boyhood” and “Mad Max: Fury Road” had been widely screened and started industry buzz by late June. This year, there is a lot of industry enthusiasm for a few January-to-June titles such as “Zootopia,” “The Jungle Book” and “The Witch.” But best-pic contenders? Not so sure.

The festivals so far have offered possibilities like “Manchester by the Sea” and “Loving.” And some pundits anointed “The Birth of a Nation” as the Oscar front-runner last January (a mixed blessing for Fox Searchlight, »

- Tim Gray

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Edinburgh 2016: Hunt for the Wilderpeople review

19 June 2016 10:17 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ 'Magestical' isn't necessarily a real word but it perfectly sums up Kiwi director Taika Waititi's Hunt for the Wilderpeople. Invented by Sam Neill's gruff, illiterate grouch of an old codger, Hector, to describe a breathtaking mountain-top vista above New Zealand's wilderness, in the company of hip-hop loving, fast-talking and lovable troublemaker Ricky Baker (Julian Dennison, who is a revelation), one can't argue against it. With something for the big kid in all of us, Hunt for the Wilderpeople pours a dose of the mystery and wonderment of Beasts of the Southern Wild, the sense of loss and troubled childhoods of Son of Rambow and the reckless, carefree abandonment of outlaws on the run in Thelma & Louise.

»

- CineVue UK

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As Stacey Snider Ascends at Fox, Hollywood Is in Turnaround

17 June 2016 9:44 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

At the 2014 New York Film Festival premiere of “Gone Girl,” Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos seemed visibly relieved to have Stacey Snider finally join the studio, after months of speculation that this capable executive would join him from DreamWorks. Now, almost two years later —and after a 25-year career at Fox —the studio has confirmed that Gianopulos’ contract will not be renewed after it expires on June 30, 2017, when he will graduate “upstairs” into an executive role at parent company 21st Century Fox.

This follows a transition for Snider that has not been smooth. While the veteran exec has the right mix of skills to run a studio (and did so at Universal with Ron Meyer), knows how to manage a team of executives, and how to develop, produce, and release movies that are smart and four-quadrant friendly, entering the Fox landscape proved to be a challenge. »

- Anne Thompson

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As Stacey Snider Ascends at Fox, Hollywood Is in Turnaround

17 June 2016 9:44 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

At the 2014 New York Film Festival premiere of “Gone Girl,” Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos seemed visibly relieved to have Stacey Snider finally join the studio, after months of speculation that this capable executive would join him from DreamWorks. Now, almost two years later —and after a 25-year career at Fox —the studio has confirmed that Gianopulos’ contract will not be renewed after it expires on June 30, 2017, when he will graduate “upstairs” into an executive role at parent company 21st Century Fox.

This follows a transition for Snider that has not been smooth. While the veteran exec has the right mix of skills to run a studio (and did so at Universal with Ron Meyer), knows how to manage a team of executives, and how to develop, produce, and release movies that are smart and four-quadrant friendly, entering the Fox landscape proved to be a challenge. »

- Anne Thompson

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John Singleton Sounds Off On the ‘Dismal’ State of Contemporary Black Cinema

13 June 2016 11:31 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hosted a 25th anniversary screening of John Singleton’s “Boyz N the Hood” at the Sva Theatre in New York City last Sunday as part of their “Spotlight on Screenwriting” series. This followed an event in Los Angeles the Academy hosted for the film on Friday.

After the screening, Oscar-nominated writer and director Singleton sat down with acclaimed author Walter Mosley to discuss what “Boyz” means 25 years later, including how it launched its career, how time has shifted its cultural weight and, for Singleton, how film increasingly struggles to mean anything culturally. Read five highlights from the talk below:

Read More: John Singleton Channels August Wilson – Pens Op-ed On White Directors Helming Black Films

Singleton uses two words to describe the current state of black cinema: “Dismal” and “abysmal.” 

At the discussion, Singleton repeatedly discussed his interest in films specific to culture and afro-centric experiences. Yet he lamented that films like that are not being made by other minority directors, especially in the studio system.

“It doesn’t matter how many hits and how much money the movies are making,” said Singleton. “They don’t have any cultural consciousness to them now. They have smatterings and little bits here and there, but it’s abysmal. It’s not like every movie has to make a statement at all. Movies don’t have to preach, they’re entertainment first.”

“But in terms of cultural weight – if we have cultural weight, it will be entertaining. And that’s what I feel I try to go for. I just try to rep hard for Spike [Lee], when he was starting he was trying to get people to say ‘hey listen, we can have our own idiom in film. We can have a black film aesthetic. We can have a thing that’s unique.’ When I do whatever I’m trying to do, I’m still trying to rep that,” he said.

This lack of personal voices in film is a result of a studio culture that he doesn’t think would support “Boyz N the Hood” today. 

Mosley and Singleton broke down how unlike government-sanctioned international cinema that “gives artists free reign to have dissenting views,” said Singleton, cultural specificity is lost in commerce-driven american cinema.

“There are so many stories that have yet to be chronicled about what really went on in Los Angeles in the early 80s,” said Singleton. “Yet our film culture is all based on commerce. You have a paucity of personal voices in film. Yes, you have a lot of independent films that are getting made, but even so they’re not what they were. You don’t have as many anachronistic true voices that are different from the norm. You have that at a lower level where people are making films on their iPhones now, doing new stuff.”

“There used to be a time where you had a support of these acrostic voices. These films that were really specific…you don’t have that with the studios right now,” Singleton added. “That’s why American cinema is really suffering right now. It’s sort of like the small movies are the farm stuff for the big films. If George Lucas didn’t make ‘American Graffiti,’ he wouldn’t have ‘Star Wars.’ And ‘American Graffiti’ is specific to a sort of time and place that was changing and evolving. You could never make those films now. You could never make ‘Boyz N the Hood’ now.”

Morris believed in spite of media attention from Black Lives Matter, the push for awareness of minority voices will not translate directly to more prominence for black artists.

“In truth, Black Lives Matter says we’re paying attention to everything because if our lives don’t matter then your lives don’t matter,” said Morris. “And they’ve done a lot of work and they are doing a lot of work. But I think it’s a long journey from that to those 25, 35, 135 million dollar movies.”

Boyz N the Hood” came from a young USC grad making an identity as “a black filmmaker repping Los Angeles.”

Singleton describes his first feature as a bridge between what he saw and grew up with in Los Angeles and his study of Italian neorealism (films like “The Bicycle Thieves” and “Open City”).  Yet there was one figure in Singleton’s life who started the whole quest.

“I look at it as a time capsule of what I was thinking and feeling at the time,” said Singleton. “I was 20 years old and I went and saw ‘Do the Right Thing,” which came out in the summer of 1989. Spike [Lee] has always been my cinematic big brother. Before I went to school and he visited La he pushed other people out of the way to shake my hand. I told him I was going to USC Film School and for him to watch out for me. So I went to school for four years rapping black cinema. I was one of the only black filmmakers and students in a predominantly white film culture. It was a continued marginalization – the attitude was there was only one Spike Lee. I was like, ‘I’m not the next Spike Lee, I’m the next John Singleton.’”

The need to create “Boyz” was driven by Singleton’s desire to write a film about what he knew: to go back to his family and figure out this story.

“I was at USC, which was still adjunct to the neighborhood I was growing up in,” said Singleton. “And I wouldn’t say I was having Ptsd because I was still in the environment, but I was having dreams like that. Having dreams about the stuff I’d seen in my childhood and teenage years. But I’m on an island – if you step off the campus, you’re in the mix. This is the 80s still. The script for ‘Boyz’ came out of that.”

Read More: The 10 Best Oscar-Nominated Directors

There are promising movies to Singleton that are immersed in a time and place. A favorite of his? “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” 

Singleton and Mosley lavished praise on Benh Zeitlin’s 2012 film, which Mosley helped foster when Zeitlin brought the script to Sundance Labs in 2008.

“Beautiful, beautiful film,” said Singleton. “Benh [Zeitlin] did a great job on that. There a scene where she goes over on that ferry and goes to that place, and it’s a questionable place…you don’t know if she’s seeing her mother or a vision of her mother, and the woman fries that alligator tail. And she’s telling this quasi-sexual story. But that never could’ve been done if the filmmakers didn’t live down there. And he’s not black, but he’s a brother, you know? If you see that movie, he takes you somewhere special and different, and he does it in an interesting, lyrical kind of way.”

The two took inspiration from how Zeitlin and his crew went spent several months in Louisiana taking in the culture of a world that would become The Bathtub. “They lived with the film,” said Mosley. Singleton thought other filmmakers should take note.

“I’m interested in doing a quasi-sort of thing with Chinese kids. I’m not Chinese. But I’m going to immerse myself in what these kids are going for,” said Singleton. “There’s not enough of that. And you can be from a certain culture and not know anything about where you’re from, too. That’s why a lot of black filmmakers are making marginal films right now. Because they’re not really astute at what the weight is that came before them. If you’re making gumbo, and the base is bad, it’s not going to taste good.”

Singleton wants his work to serve as a “conduit” for the voiceless. 

Director of eight films and three TV shows since “Boyz,” Singleton has kept himself busy in the past 25 years. Yet the work that interests him to this date remains small, personal, ostracized stories.

“I always wanted to be the kind of storyteller that was still accessible to folks,” said Singleton. “I’m doing Snowfall [the upcoming series for FX], I have another show called Rebel which just got announced… I’m interested in continuing the foundation that was set with ‘Boyz.’ Near my office there’s a park I go to, and I see people who just got released, people who are schizophrenic, people who are living from halfway house to halfway house. When you’re in and around folks, you get stories.”

“Everyone has stories to tell, but not everyone has a way to tell it. Not everyone can sit down and write it, damn near make a movie about it. But what I feel is that I’m a conduit for those folks,” he said. “And I’m not so visible that I’m not accessible. I’m not on TV all the time, I’m not doing the celebrity thing. I’d like to think I work like Ernest Hemingway. He would travel to different places, and he would write about his experiences. I love listening and talking to folks, and that’s how I get the rhythm and cadence of language.”

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Related stories2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Director2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor »

- Russell Goldman

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Posterized: Movies About Young Black Girls

3 June 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Not every movie has a white straight male protagonist. It just seems like that since that's Hollywood's default and also the preferred proxy of most (white straight male) auteurs.

But the times are finally a-changing. This weekend features the platform release of a mesmerizing new indie called The Fits -- please see it as soon as it opens near you. I was so proud to push for honoring it on my jury at the Nashville Film Festival. Fresh perspectives on the screen can be so exhilarating. That's especially true when the execution is this confident. Remember the debut director's name, Anna Rose Holmer, since we're hoping for more great movies to come.

In the meantime, let's take a trip back through other features with young black girls as the lead character. I haven't seen the first or the last movie on this list of nine below but the rest all »

- NATHANIEL R

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From Kristen Stewart to Steven Spielberg, Awards Possibilities Abound in Cannes Lineup

10 May 2016 10:17 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Inasmuch as anything can be called “official” in the unscientific business of Oscar-watching, the early-fall festival trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto marks the official start of awards season: Venice, in particular, is on a roll, having premiered the last two best picture winners (“Spotlight” and “Birdman,” not to mention 2013’s close runner-up “Gravity”) in calmly European style before the noise built up on the other side of the pond.

Happily situated in the less frenzied days of spring, Cannes sits at a respectable distance from the mania of the U.S. awards derby. It is, after all, a festival principally devoted to the kind of high-art world cinema that rarely rules the Oscars: For every Palme d’Or winner like “The Pianist” or “Amour” that breaks through to Academy voters, there are several others (“Winter Sleep,” “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days”) that aren’t remotely on their wavelength. »

- Guy Lodge

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Writers Guild Pushes for Diversity Tax Credit in New York

9 May 2016 3:34 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Writers Guild of America East has asked New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to support providing diversity production credits for TV shows.

The legislation would expand the state’s incentive program to include credits for shows that include writers and directors who are women or people of color.

The WGA East delivered nearly 500 letters to the governor Monday — with high profile signers such as Tina Fey and “Spotlight” writer-director Tom McCarthy — in support of proposed legislation that would designate $5 million of the $420 million Empire State Film Production Tax Credit for productions that hire female or minority writers or directors. It would be the first time a film state tax credit has included a diversity clause.

Signers included “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” scribe Michael Arndt; David Simon (“The Wire”); Robert Carlock (“The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”); “Goodfellas” author-screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi; Sarah Treem (“The Affair”), Michael H. Weber (“The Fault in Our Stars »

- Dave McNary

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'Fathers and Daughters' Trailer: Amanda Seyfried Learns To Love Again With The Help of Aaron Paul

6 May 2016 8:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the new drama "Fathers and Daughters," Russell Crowe plays Jake Davis a literary giant who published a widely-acclaimed novel about his relationship with his own daughter Katie (Kylie Rodgers). Though he loves her very much, Jake is suffering a mental breakdown and thus isn't equipped to take care of his daughter, so he leaves her in the charge of others. Now, 27 years later, an older Katie (Amanda Seyfried) struggles to connect with others, but with the help of a kind stranger (Aaron Paul), maybe she can learn to love yet again. Watch the trailer for the new film above. Read More: Amanda Seyfried Joins David Lynch's 'Twin Peaks' In New Pivotal Role Directed by Gabrielle Muccino ("The Pursuit of Happyness," "Seven Pounds"), "Fathers and Daughters" also stars Diane Kruger ("Inglourious Basterds"), Quvenzhané Wallis ("Beasts of the Southern Wild"), Janet McTeer ("Tumbleweeds") Octavia Spencer »

- Vikram Murthi

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The Current Debate: Beyoncé’s "Lemonade"

4 May 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

It would be insufficient, writes Carrie Battan, to call Beyoncé’s Lemonade an album: “The project is also a piece of spoken word, a narrative film, a map of cultural reference points, and a window into the soul of an icon whose inner life has always seemed just out of reach.” Battan’s description hints at what has so excited the Internet in the week and a half since Lemonade’s release: it’s not only a new Beyoncé album—it’s also her most personal work yet, and one that, as Ash Sarkar notes at the London Review of Books, is uniquely political:“How has this happened? How has Beyoncé engendered such a deep sense of solidarity among women and the marginalised? Most reviewers have pointed out that Lemonade is Beyoncé’s most personal and political work to date, but few have interrogated how the album moves between the two. »

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Inside Beyoncé's Lemonade Squad: A Who's Who of the Powerful Visual Album's Cameos

28 April 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Internet may be focused on hunting down "Becky with the good hair," but we're stuck on the women standing with and by Beyoncé in her powerful, one-of-a-kind visual album Lemonade. While Blue Ivy and Jay Z's cameos in the HBO special were expected (the family has shared the screen before), a number of female Hollywood power players also got into costume to support Beyoncé's eye-opening endeavor. From tennis champion Serena Williams to 93-year-old Creole cooking legend Leah Chase, here's who Queen Bey tapped to make lemonade - and why. Serena Williams @beyonce/a> A photo posted by »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Inside Beyoncé's Lemonade Squad: A Who's Who of the Powerful Visual Album's Cameos

28 April 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Internet may be focused on hunting down "Becky with the good hair," but we're stuck on the women standing with and by Beyoncé in her powerful, one-of-a-kind visual album Lemonade. While Blue Ivy and Jay Z's cameos in the HBO special were expected (the family has shared the screen before), a number of female Hollywood power players also got into costume to support Beyoncé's eye-opening endeavor. From tennis champion Serena Williams to 93-year-old Creole cooking legend Leah Chase, here's who Queen Bey tapped to make lemonade - and why. Serena Williams @beyonce/a> A photo posted by »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Reverberates Around the Internet, Pop Culture

25 April 2016 3:02 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Beyonce’s foray into arthouse filmmaking with “Lemonade” still has the Internet abuzz, even two days after its premiere on HBO.

The 60-minute “visual album” has set off a digital scavenger hunt among fans, both hardcore and casual.

The “Lemonade” storyline about a woman’s ride on an emotional roller coaster after being betrayed by the love of her life has off a tidal wave of speculation about how much of the material was drawn from Beyonce’s own experience in her marriage to music mogul Jay Z. Rachel Roy, a woman alleged to have been linked romantically to Jay Z, was swarmed on social media by angry Beyonce fans amid speculation that she’s the “Becky with the good hair” referred to in one of the songs addressing the pain of infidelity.

Roy fanned the flames herself by posting on Instagram: “Good hair don’t care, but we will take good lighting, »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Dreamworks’ ‘Trolls’ gains six new cast members

22 April 2016 1:18 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Zooey Deschanel, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Jeffrey Tambor, Christine Baranski, Quvenzhané Wallis and John Cleese have joined the cast of Dreamworks’ upcoming Trolls. The animated film hits cinemas in October.

The six new vocal actors join the already cast Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, Russell Brand, James Corden, Kunal Nayyar, Ron Funches, Icona Pop and Gwen Stefani. Trolls will release on October 21st, 2016.

Here’s the official release from the studio.

The party continues to grow as DreamWorks Animation’s Trolls adds Zooey Deschanel (New Girl, (500) Days of Summer), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (How to Train Your Dragon, Neighbors), Jeffrey Tambor (Transparent, Arrested Development), Christine Baranski (The Good Wife, Into the Woods), Quvenzhané Wallis (Annie, Beasts of the Southern Wild) and John Cleese (Shrek Forever After, A Fish Called Wanda) to an already star-studded cast, led by Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake. “Our cast is quite literally bursting with talent,” said Director Mike Mitchell. This »

- Paul Heath

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DreamWorks adds to voice cast of Trolls movie

19 April 2016 5:52 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

DreamWorks Animation has announced that it has expanded the cast of the upcoming Trolls movie with the addition of Zooey Deschanel (New Girl), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (How to Train Your Dragon), Jeffrey Tambor (Transparent), Christine Baranski (Into the Woods), Quvenzhané Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) and John Cleese (A Fish Called Wanda).

“Our cast is quite literally bursting with talent,” states director Mike Mitchell. “This mix of comedic and musical star-power is every filmmaker’s dream.”

“We’re fortunate to work with such an incredible group of artists,” adds co-director Walt Dohrn. “We can’t wait to share the colourful, magical Trolls universe with fans around the world.”

See Also: Watch the trailer for Trolls here

This holiday season, enter a colourful, wondrous world populated by hilariously unforgettable characters and discover the story of the overly optimistic Trolls, with a constant song on their lips, and the comedically pessimistic Bergens, »

- Gary Collinson

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‘Swiss Army Man’ Trailer: Here’s That Daniel Radcliffe Farting Corpse Movie You’ve Heard So Much About

4 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Every year at Sundance, there are a small handful of films that get hyped up sight unseen: your Boyhoods, your The Raid 2s. A few others come out of seemingly nowhere to become the toast of the town, a la Beasts of the Southern Wild or Birth of a Nation. Dozens more still fly under the radar the whole […]

The post ‘Swiss Army Man’ Trailer: Here’s That Daniel Radcliffe Farting Corpse Movie You’ve Heard So Much About appeared first on /Film. »

- Angie Han

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SXSW Film Review: ‘My Father Die’

15 March 2016 11:52 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The swamp-thing progeny of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and “The Night of the Hunter” (with a little “Cape Fear” thrown in), “My Father Die” offers blood-and-thunder Southern-gothic excess both tempered and heightened by vivid directorial texturing. Writer-helmer Sean Brosnan’s debut feature after several shorts isn’t exactly a horror film, but this thematically simple, aesthetically complex revenge tale will find strongest initial support among fans at genre fests, with word of mouth there possibly spurring niche theatrical pickups as well as more assured home-format sales.

A black-and-white opening sequence finds the dirt-poor Rawlings brothers running wild in Louisiana bayou country, where the teenage Chester (Chester Rushing) promises to initiate the pubescent Asher in the mysteries of sex via willing young neighbor Nana (Trina Lafargue). Unfortunately, their dad, Ivan (former British pro boxer Gary Stretch), considers her his own property — never mind that he’s still married to the »

- Dennis Harvey

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Sundance at the Oscars

28 February 2016 5:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Gary McCurry on the Sundance movies that have enjoyed success at the Oscars…

Since 1984, the Sundance Film Festival as we know it today has been shining a light on independent movies. Held annually in Park City, Utah, Sundance has become the largest independent film festival in the United States. Many notable directors have came through the ranks, including Quentin Tarantino (Reservoir Dogs), Paul Thomas Anderson (Cigarettes & Coffee/Hard Eight), Kevin Smith (Clerks) and Benh Zeitlin (Beasts of the Southern Wild).

With that history lesson over, I’m looking to recap upon the movies that have gone through Sundance on the road to the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Some housekeeping before we begin. This isn’t a complete list of every movie to have won the sword wielding knight, more a few notes on the film festivals success throughout the years. Talking of years, you’ll find them in order »

- Gary McCurry

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Oscars: Ranking the Best Picture Nominees

25 February 2016 4:01 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Justin Chang: Guy, we started this deep-dive conversation about the best picture race less than an hour after Alejandro G. Inarritu clinched the Directors Guild of America’s top prize for “The Revenant,” which was pretty much the last confirmation we needed — after the Producers Guild picked “The Big Short” and the Screen Actors Guild opted for “Spotlight” — that this really is the wildest, craziest, most confoundingly unpredictable best-picture Oscar race in years. Exciting, isn’t it? I’d be more excited if this recent turn of events didn’t seem to favor “The Revenant,” which now has extraordinary momentum on its side. There we were, hoping the film’s Golden Globe triumphs would simply be an isolated HFPA fluke — but then it came roaring back with a vengeance, not unlike that easily distracted CGI bear at its center, ready to sink its teeth back into the race and not let go this time. »

- Justin Chang and Guy Lodge

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Altitude takes UK on Ira Sachs' 'Little Men'

13 February 2016 4:01 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Love Is Strange director reunites with UK distributor.

Altitude Film Distribution has acquired the UK distribution rights to Sundance drama Little Men.

The deal was negotiated between Altitude Film Entertainment’s Ellie Gibbons and Mongrel International’s Charlotte Mickie.

The acquisition is the second between Sachs and Altitude, having previously released the highly acclaimed Love is Strange.

Little Men follows Jake (Theo Taplitz), a quiet, sensitive middle schooler with dreams of being an artist. He meets the affably brash Tony (Michael Barbieri) at his grandfather’s funeral, and the unlikely pair soon hit it off.

The budding friendship is put at risk, however, when a rent dispute between Jake’s parents, Brian and Kathy (Greg Kinnear and Jennifer Ehle), and Tony’s mother, Leonor (Paulina Garcia), threatens to become contentious.

Sachs co-wrote the screenplay with Mauricio Zacharis (Love is Strange).

Producers are Lucas Joaquin (Beasts of the Southern Wild), Sachs, Christos V. Konstantakopoulos ([link »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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