How to Survive a Plague
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012

10 items from 2015


David Kennedy Dies: TV Producer & Former Talent Agent Was 73

1 July 2015 7:13 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

David Kennedy, veteran TV producer and former talent agent, died suddenly on June 14 in Los Angeles from complications from knee replacement surgery, according to a statement from FX Productions. He was 73. Kennedy was under a first-look development deal with FX Prods at the time of his death, an agreement that was recently renewed for another two years, according to the network. Among his projects were How To Survive A Plague, which he was developing with David France… »

Permalink | Report a problem


David Kennedy, Talent Agent Turned Producer, Dies at 73

1 July 2015 7:02 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

David Kennedy, a top talent agent in the 1970s and ’80s who segued into producing, has died. He was 73.

Kennedy died in Los Angeles on June 14 as a result of complications from knee replacement surgery, FX confirmed Wednesday.

Kennedy was most recently developing several projects at FX under a first-look deal with FX Prods., including a narrative take on the 2012 AIDS activism documentary “How to Survive a Plague.”

As a producer he was known for such telepics as CBS’ Emmy-winning 2005 drama “Saving Milly” and Showtime’s “Our Fathers.”

Kennedy spent 12 years as head of TV for ICM, based in New York where he represented such notables as Robin Williams, Lorne Michaels, Eddie Murphy, Dick Clark, Debbie Allen and Joe Piscopo. He segued to the production side with his move west to work as senior VP of programming for Pearson Television and Reg Grundy Prods.

Kennedy later became president of Dan Curtis Prods. »

- Cynthia Littleton

Permalink | Report a problem


TV Producer David Kennedy, a Former Agent, Dies Suddenly at 73

1 July 2015 6:52 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

David Kennedy, the former entertainment talent agent and an award-winning television producer, died suddenly on June 14 in Los Angeles due to complications from knee replacement surgery.

For the past two years, the 73-year-old Kennedy had been developing numerous television projects for FX Networks under a first-look deal with FX Productions, an agreement that was recently renewed for another two years prior to his death. Among the projects were “How to Survive a Plague,” which he was developing with David France, along with David Siegel and Scott McGehee, based on France’s award-winning documentary of the same name. He was also developing “A Perfect Terrorist,” based on the “Frontline” episode of the same name from Wgbh and ProPublica, with producers David Fanning, Joshua Goldin, Rachel Abramowitz and Sebastian Rotella.

Kennedy was also executive producer of the movie “Dark Shadows,” starring Johnny Depp. Kennedy had a close relationship with Depp’s company »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


TV Producer David Kennedy, a Former Agent, Dies Suddenly at 73

1 July 2015 6:52 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

David Kennedy, the former entertainment talent agent and an award-winning television producer, died suddenly on June 14 in Los Angeles due to complications from knee replacement surgery.

For the past two years, the 73-year-old Kennedy had been developing numerous television projects for FX Networks under a first-look deal with FX Productions, an agreement that was recently renewed for another two years prior to his death. Among the projects were “How to Survive a Plague,” which he was developing with David France, along with David Siegel and Scott McGehee, based on France’s award-winning documentary of the same name. He was also developing “A Perfect Terrorist,” based on the “Frontline” episode of the same name from Wgbh and ProPublica, with producers David Fanning, Joshua Goldin, Rachel Abramowitz and Sebastian Rotella.

Kennedy was also executive producer of the movie “Dark Shadows,” starring Johnny Depp. Kennedy had a close relationship with Depp’s company »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Gay Rights and Hollywood Still Have a Long Way to Go

29 June 2015 7:05 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Activist David Mixner stood alone on a theater stage in Los Angeles at the start of this year’s Gay Pride Month, sharing his memories with an audience of friends, political figures and a smattering of celebrities, about the time Ronald Reagan saw the light.

It was 1978, and aides to Reagan, who was on the cusp of launching his presidential campaign, believed he was ready to endorse a California initiative to ban gays and lesbians from teaching in the state’s classrooms, a ballot proposition inspired by the anti-gay crusades of singer Anita Bryant.

Mixner remembered when he and fellow activist Peter Scott landed a secret meeting with Reagan, who was exceedingly charming and willing to listen. Mixner warned the soon-to-be candidate that the initiative would create anarchy: Students could retaliate for a bad grade by accusing their teachers of being gay.

Reagan didn’t immediately reveal what he was going to do, »

- Ted Johnson and Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Gay Rights and Hollywood Still Have a Long Way to Go

29 June 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Activist David Mixner stood alone on a theater stage in Los Angeles at the start of this year’s Gay Pride Month, sharing his memories with an audience of friends, political figures and a smattering of celebrities, about the time Ronald Reagan saw the light.

It was 1978, and aides to Reagan, who was on the cusp of launching his presidential campaign, believed he was ready to endorse a California initiative to ban gays and lesbians from teaching in the state’s classrooms, a ballot proposition inspired by the anti-gay crusades of singer Anita Bryant.

Mixner remembered when he and fellow activist Peter Scott landed a secret meeting with Reagan, who was exceedingly charming and willing to listen. Mixner warned the soon-to-be candidate that the initiative would create anarchy: Students could retaliate for a bad grade by accusing their teachers of being gay.

Reagan didn’t immediately reveal what he was going to do, »

- Ted Johnson and Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Nicole Kidman set to join See-Saw's 'Parties'

12 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Cast rounds on John Cameron Mitchell’s “punks and aliens” feature adapted from a Neil Gaiman story; HanWay boards sales.

Nicole Kidman is in advanced talks to join John Cameron Mitchell’s anticipated comedy-romance How to Talk to Girls at Parties, which is readying for an autumn shoot in the UK.

Golden Globe-winner Ruth Wilson (The Affair) and Matt Lucas (Alice in Wonderland) are also set to join the previously announced Elle Fanning (Maleficent) on the buzzy package, which has been newly boarded by production outfit See-Saw and sales firm HanWay, which will launch the project in Cannes this week.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch director Mitchell and Philippa Goslett (Little Ashes) have written the screenplay, which is adapted from Neil Gaiman’s short story of the same name in which an alien (Fanning) touring the galaxy breaks away from her group and meets two young inhabitants of the most dangerous place in the universe: the London »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Meet the 2015 Sundance Filmmakers #78: 'How To Change The World' Explores the Early Days Of Greenpeace

31 January 2015 1:47 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When you hear the word "Greenpeace," you probably think of bright young post-grads in neon vests, standing outside your local Whole Foods, clipboard in hand, asking if you have a minute to talk about the environment. Or maybe you think of whaling ships in Japan being told to cease and desist by windbreaker'd men and women on a little boat, tossed around in the water. Greenpeace has become so synonymous with the pro-environment movement that we take it for granted; isn't it one of those organizations that's been around forever, like the Red Cross and Salvation Army? In "How To Change The World," audiences are given a look at the first days of Greenpeace in the early '70s. Much like the similarly titled AIDS crisis doc "How To Survive A Plague," Jerry Rothwell's Greenpeace documentary follows a group of passionate citizens responding to a crisis with little infrastructure or know-how. »

- Elizabeth Logan

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Reviews: Literary Lions, Troubled Teens, Lithuanian Lesbians

24 January 2015 9:36 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

A first sampling of Sundance offerings reveals illuminating documentaries and compelling, if not perfect, narratives

A bit of friendly advice to the producers of “Ten Thousand Saints”: Please, please, please get rid of the opening narration in which the protagonist observes that life is like a river. It’s the worst line of dialogue in the whole movie, and it starts the proceedings off with a cringe.

Luckily, the script (by directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini, adapting the novel by Eleanor Henderson) gets better from there. After the death of his best friend Teddy (Avan Jogia, also »

- Alonso Duralde

Permalink | Report a problem


Make a Movie, Change the World: What It's Like to Work with Impact Partners

22 January 2015 7:05 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Since its inception in 2007, Impact Partners has been involved in the financing of over 50 films, including award-winning documentaries such as "The Cove," "An Inconvenient Truth," "The Garden," "Hell and Back Again," How to Survive a Plague" and many more. These films have not only been critical successes but have also succeeded in changing public opinion. This year, six films supported by the company will be screening at Sundance: "Sembene!," "How to Change the World",  "Dreamcatcher," "Chuck Norris vs. Communism," "Censored Voices" and "The Hunting Ground." "Impact Partners was a key piece in the puzzle of putting ‘Chuck Norris vs. Communism’ together," said John Battsek, managing director of Passion Pictures and an executive producer on the film. "Companies like Impact are invaluable when it comes to social issue documentaries." Cogan's »

- Paula Bernstein

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012

10 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners