The Story of Film examines world cinema in the period of 1965-1969 when New Wave Cinema swept the world and gave rise to a whole new generation of filmmakers. It first looks at the work of ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself - Presenter
...
Himself - Interviewee
...
Himself - Interviewee
Mani Kaul ...
Himself - Interviewee
...
Herself
...
Himself - Interviewee
...
Himself - Interviewee
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Narrator (voice)
Edit

Storyline

The Story of Film examines world cinema in the period of 1965-1969 when New Wave Cinema swept the world and gave rise to a whole new generation of filmmakers. It first looks at the work of director Roman Polanski before turning to Czech filmmakers Jiri Trnka, Milos Forman, and Vera Chytilova, It then looks at directors in Hungary (Miklos Jancso), the Soviet Union (Andrei Tarkovsky and Sergei Parajanov), Japan (Nagisa Oshima and Shohei Imamura), India (Ritwik Ghatak), Brazil (Glauber Rocha), Iran (Forugh Farrokhzad), and Senegal (Ousmane Sembene). It also examines director in England including Karel Reisz, Ken Loach, and Richard Lester. Finally it turns to America and a growing movement of innovative film-makers in the late 60s including Robert Drew, John Cassavetes, Alfred Hitchcock, Andy Warhol, Haskell Wexler, Dennis Hopper, and Stanley Kubrick. Written by Shatterdaymorn

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 October 2011 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Quotes

Himself - Presenter: [about opening sequence from 2001: A Space Odyssey] Editing in film usually cuts out time. This famous cut, from pre-human life to the time of space travel, cuts out more time than any other edit in movie history.
See more »

Connections

Features 66 Scenes from America (1982) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
New Directors, New Forms
6 July 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Apparently in the 1960s, film goes global -- which seems odd from this documentary, which has been pushing the concept of Russian and Japanese films (among others) since the first or second segment. But now we are venturing into eastern Europe...

We explore the Polish directors Andrzej Wajda (whose work is unknown to me) and Roman Polanski (whose work I have seen all of). Cousins considers "Fearless Vampire Killers" among Polanski's best work, which is an incredibly bold statement. I would tend to put it among his lowest.

We get a glimpse of the Czech New Wave, with such films as "Daisies" and "The Hand". I know practically nothing of Czech cinema, so this had me running out and picking u pa few items.

Of course, we cannot talk about 1960s film without getting to "Easy Rider" and Roger Corman. Hooray for artsy, pre-1970s entertainment and romance.


1 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
His accent? Jake-46
Please redo with audible narration thedonat
Why did he narrate himself? bsalar2004
so many great directors are missing aysesezer
List of movies referenced by Cousins? Jeff_Laxley
Mark that is Kyuzo NOT Katsushiro mad19571
Discuss New Directors, New Form (2011) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?