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Terra Blight (2012)

Not Rated | | Documentary, Drama | 24 January 2012 (USA)
Terra Blight is a feature-length documentary that explores America's consumption of computers and the hazardous waste we create in pursuit of the latest technology.

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Terra Blight is a feature-length documentary that explores America's consumption of computers and the hazardous waste we create in pursuit of the latest technology.

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Documentary | Drama

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Not Rated
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24 January 2012 (USA)  »

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Documentary filmmaking at its best!
21 October 2012 | by See all my reviews

The best documentaries change our perspective of the visible world by showing us the invisible world. Terra Blight accomplishes this and so much more - and that's why it is a must see film! As we begin to ponder the ethical implications of how to use our ever- evolving technology, Terra Blight asks us to consider the ethical implications of how we dispose of our ever-increasing technological waste. From our local computer store to a remote village in Ghana, the film incisively delivers the juxtaposition of the average American consumer's appetite for technology with the plight of an African village contaminated by the highly dangerous metals from our old electronics. In Ghana, we meet an enigmatic local activist who introduces us to the children of the village who, out of economic necessity, act as metal scavengers in the dump site. As he tries to raise awareness of the dangers of this waste, we also learn of the dangers that have been created by these chemicals right here in the U.S., and thus we learn the real human cost of carelessly producing and carelessly disposing of our electronics. However, before the situation seems hopeless, the film introduces us to the people on the front lines of recycling electronics and suddenly we see that this a very horrible but very fixable problem - that is, if you are aware there is a problem to begin with. If you own a computer, a phone, or any other electronic, you NEED to see this film - you won't regret it!


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