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Virgin Tales (2012)

5.8
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Ratings: 5.8/10 from 93 users  
Reviews: 2 user | 6 critic

Evangelical Christians are calling out for a second sexual revolution: chastity. As a counter-movement of the attitudes and practices of today's culture, one in six girls in the US has ... See full summary »

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Title: Virgin Tales (2012)

Virgin Tales (2012) on IMDb 5.8/10

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Evangelical Christians are calling out for a second sexual revolution: chastity. As a counter-movement of the attitudes and practices of today's culture, one in six girls in the US has vowed to remain 'unsoiled' until marriage. But the seven children of the Wilson family, founders of the Purity Ball, take this concept of purity of body and mind one step further; even their first kiss will be at the altar. For two years, the filmmakers follow the Wilson offspring as they prepare for their fairytale vision of romance and marriage and seek out their own prince and princess spouses. In the process, a broader theme emerges: how the religious right is grooming a young generation of virgins to embody an Evangelically-grounded Utopia in America. Written by ican films gmbh

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13 October 2012 (USA)  »

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Virgin Tales  »

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Randy WIlson: The Bible tells us how to live, it doesn't walk around issues. There's confusion in the realm of marriage. Who can marry? Is it one man, one woman, is it anybody? And the people want it to be more about just love - and can we all get along - and tolerance and all. I think If we really look seriously at these issues you can find that tolerance can be a major part of the division.
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Creepy, creepy, creepy
13 October 2013 | by (Chicago, IL) – See all my reviews

Of all the documentaries I have ever seen -- and there have been numerous - this is probably one of the creepiest. This one even beats out films about sexual predators. At least I know what to expect with those. While I've been familiar with the concept of purity balls and seen other footage pertaining to it, this film truly proved to me how dangerous these attitudes are for individuals and society as a whole. But in this case, the people have decided to surrender their individuality, so it seems they'll never know the difference.

Watching the adoring women basically at the feet of these men was heartbreaking. All I could think about was how hard women have fought to have their own voice. And no one in this film honored that even one iota. It was like going back in history where women were born simply to service men, bear children, cook, clean and basically take whatever punishments were meted out to them. Guess that's why one of the "teachers" touted a book from the last century as gospel. The entire identities of these women were built around serving their families and nothing more - despite having brains and the capacity to create something other than a baby.

It was no shock, then, that women were actually trained to behave a certain way, while it was just assumed that men would do what they were supposed to do. "Welcome people with a smile," one of the instructors said. "Bend at the knee," so your cleavage doesn't show and your butt doesn't stick out. How about the men? Do they need to welcome people with a smile? Must they worry about how their chest or butt looks? Or are they just allowed to do as they wish and be truthful about how they feel? Boy, the women wearing burkas have nothing on these people. At least when you wear a burka, you don't have to be so obsessed with every gesture or movement, because they're already covered up! Maybe they should just get cloaks for all the women and then they wouldn't have to train them like monkeys. But even a monkey wouldn't be dumb enough to go for this.

Looking at movement leader Randy Wilson, who founded the balls, and his wife, all I could think about was fallen politico John Edwards and his poor wife, Elizabeth. Wilson has kept himself in shape, while his wife

  • well, not so much. It's not that women need to be thin -- but
healthy, yes. And she did not really appear to be healthy. And then I thought about John Edwards cheating on his wife... and wondered -- hmmmm.... anything is possible. After all, if a woman is supposed to be in service to her husband but no longer can perform those services, what would prevent a man of God from getting that service elsewhere? It isn't that far fetched to believe that a religious order would justify that behavior based upon "wifely duties."

For the life of me, aside from the fact that they were related, I could not see a single reason why any of these women (or girls) idolized these men so. The sort of blind faith that everything these men would ever do would be honorable was probably the most ridiculous. But in order to give yourself so willingingly in this way - you really have to believe that.

In actuality, the concept of protecting one's sexuality sounds better and better as time progresses. It's the rest of the stuff that goes along with these concepts that is so troubling. Obsessing over ceremony in this way just seems --- cultish. The continual upbeat presentation and unwavering conviction of God's love just didn't seem genuine. It seemed more like a manufactured existence - and as the camera panned over the tops of the tract homes that many of these families lived in - only one thing came to mind. Stepford.

The idea of being God fearing is also troublesome. Why is being fearful used as a tool? Individuals should behave properly because they know it is right - not because they are afraid of the consequences of not doing so. Using fear to gain control is a great way to keep people exactly where you want them: compliant and in servitude. In a world like that, where is the innovation? How can life progress? It's apparent that this is of no consequence to people who spend their time in this type of existence.

This film is proof positive that many people believe that ignorance really is bliss. And that's the most frightening part of all. Because without individuality, self determinism and real education (the kind that also includes being exposed to society), there is really nothing worth living for.

Ironically, the people in this film talk about God continually, but seemed to be soul-less. When you give up your identity, you give up your soul. But that's what many religions are about - controlling people rather than uplifting them.


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