The Story of Film examines world cinema in the period of 1918-1932 and looks at places where movie-makers were pushing the boundaries of film. It examines the work of visually daring ... See full summary »

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Naum Kleiman ...
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Donald Richie ...
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The Story of Film examines world cinema in the period of 1918-1932 and looks at places where movie-makers were pushing the boundaries of film. It examines the work of visually daring filmmaker Ernst Lubitsch and the impressionism of French director Abel Gance. It then looks at the work of expressionists filmmakers Robert Wiene, Teinosuke Kinugasa, Fritz Lang, and F. W. Murnau. It discusses the birth of experimental film and the surrealist filmmakers Walter Ruttmann, René Clair, Alberto Cavalcanti, and Luis Bunuel. It travels to the Soviet Union to examine the influential work of Dziga Vertov, Sergei Eisenstein, and Alexander Dovzhenko. It, then, proceeds to Japan and looks at the work of Yasujiro Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi. Finally, it travels to Shanghai in China to look at its realistic cinema and the work of popular actress Ruan Lingyu. Written by Shatterdaymorn

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17 September 2011 (UK)  »

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Amazing Innovation
13 April 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Here we see the movement away from romanticism. We see the final world of silence. Ernst Lubitsch, Abel Gance, and the German expressionists brought us the surreal. We are introduced to Charles Kleine, Early Hitchcock, Kinugasa, Fritz Lang and Metropolis, King Vidor, and more of F. W. Murnau. We see Walter Rittman's abstract animation. There is Rene Clare and Cavalcante. Luis Bunuel pushes the very limits of surrealism with Un Chien Andalou. Then there are the Russians: Eisenstein, with films like Potemkin and the great scene on the Odessa steps, tops the list with montage. There is the work of Dziga Vertov and Dovshenko with works such as Earth and Arsenal. Japan produces the great Ozu and "I Was Born, But..." and Mizoguchi who some consider the greatest of all. The point is that even without great advances in technology, the hard work of these great directors and cameramen takes us on journeys into our minds. I realize that some think that this series doesn't give American filmmakers enough credit, but the Europeans at this time were unfettered for the most part, or were willing to risk their lives for their art. This is a great episode.


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