IMDb > Hello I Must Be Going (2012)
Hello I Must Be Going
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Hello I Must Be Going (2012) More at IMDbPro »

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Hello I Must Be Going -- Circumstances force a young divorcee to move back in with her parents.

Overview

User Rating:
6.2/10   3,435 votes »
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Up 25% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Sarah Koskoff (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Hello I Must Be Going on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
31 January 2013 (Russia) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
*Meet Amy Minsky. She's just getting over her divorce.
Plot:
Circumstances force a young divorcée to move back in with her parents in suburban Connecticut, where an affair with a younger guy rejuvenates her passion for life | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 2 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(152 articles)
Laggies | Review
 (From ioncinema. 24 October 2014, 12:00 PM, PDT)

Exclusive: Melanie Lynskey Talks Happy Christmas
 (From ShockYa. 25 July 2014, 4:09 PM, PDT)

Cannes Debuts Two Posters for 'Macbeth' with Michael Fassbender
 (From FirstShowing.net. 14 May 2014, 8:33 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
I cannot adequately describe how much I wanted to love this movie, but I must be honest: it did not get me involved. See more (20 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Melanie Lynskey ... Amy

Blythe Danner ... Ruth

John Rubinstein ... Stan

Sara Chase ... Missy

Daniel Eric Gold ... Noah

Tori Feinstein ... Caley

Dave T. Koenig ... Gary

Greta Lee ... Gap Girl

Meera Simhan ... Karen

Julie White ... Gwen

Damian Young ... Larry

Christopher Abbott ... Jeremy

Jimmi Simpson ... Phil
Eli Koskoff ... Teenager
Kate Arrington ... Courtney
Darcy Hicks ... Stacia

Dan Futterman ... David

Andrea Bordeaux ... Hostess
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Andreina Sosa-Keifer ... Private caterer (uncredited)

Directed by
Todd Louiso 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Sarah Koskoff  written by

Produced by
Jonathan Gray .... executive producer
Bingo Gubelmann .... executive producer
Victoria Guenier .... executive producer
Benji Kohn .... executive producer
Susan Leber .... co-producer
Chris Papavasiliou .... executive producer
Hans Ritter .... producer
Mary Jane Skalski .... producer
Austin Stark .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Laura Veirs 
 
Cinematography by
Julie Kirkwood (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Tom McArdle 
 
Casting by
Kerry Barden 
Allison Estrin 
Paul Schnee 
 
Production Design by
Russell Barnes 
 
Set Decoration by
Daniel R. Kersting 
 
Costume Design by
Bobby Frederick Tilley  (as Bobby Frederick Tilley II)
 
Makeup Department
Esther Ahn .... key hair stylist
Brenda Bush Johannesen .... makeup department head (as Brenda Bush)
Laura Menear .... additional makeup artist assistant
Jessica Toth .... additional makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Anthony J. Cox .... second assistant director (as Anthony J Cox)
Dave Halls .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Jessie Katz .... property master
Mihir Patel .... additional props
Mihir Patel .... on-set dresser
Dora Woodrum .... artist: original artwork
 
Sound Department
Jonathan Coomes .... sound effects editor
Jesse Dodd .... adr mixer
Matthew Kallen .... director of sound services
Christopher J. Leone .... sound mixer
Polly McKinnon .... supervising dialogue editor
Eric Raber .... supervising sound effects editor
Monique Reymond .... foley artist
Will Riley .... dialogue editor
Mark A. Rozett .... sound re-recording mixer
John Sanacore .... foley artist
Courtney Schade .... post-production sound coordinator
Paul Hammond .... mix technician (uncredited)
Erik Karsen Puhm .... foley mixer (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Logan Aries .... visual effects producer
Evan Guidera .... compositor: Resolution
Spencer Hecox .... senior compositor: Resolution
Todd Iorio .... senior visual effects supervisor: Resolution
Amir Qureshi .... compositor: Resolution (as Amir Quershi)
Seth Silberfein .... compositor: Resolution
 
Stunts
Tracey Ruggiero .... stunt double
Manny Siverio .... stunt coordinator
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Kevin Bacon .... best boy grip
Robert Bluemke .... media manager
Zac Clark .... additional still photographer
Michael J. DiCarlo .... second assistant camera (as Michael DiCarlo)
Philip G. Dunphy .... third grip
Alexander Engel .... key grip
Hunter Herrick .... gaffer
Julian Kapadia .... additional grip
Michael Mastroserio .... best boy electric
Justina Mintz .... still photographer
Alexander Peters .... first assistant camera: "b" camera
Bryan Sarmiento .... third electric
Nik Shpilberg .... camera intern
Jae Song .... camera operator: "b" camera
Bret Suding .... first assistant camera
Larry Thompson .... additional still photographer
 
Casting Department
Rich Delia .... casting associate: Los Angeles
Michael Fredlund .... casting assistant: New York
Adam Richards .... casting assistant: Los Angeles
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Katherine Ciarlo .... wardrobe intern
Erin Hughes .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Editorial Department
J. Cody Baker .... color assistant
Mike Chiado .... digital intermediate technologist
Beau J. Genot .... post-production consultant: 5100 Films
Noah C. Haeussner .... post-production editorial services executive producer: Union Editorial (as Noah Haeussner)
Shane Harris .... colorist
Elizabeth Hitt .... digital intermediate producer
Jackie Lee .... digital intermediate executive
Ken O'Keefe .... assistant editor
Michael Raimondi .... post-production executive producer: Union Editorial
Stefan Sonnenfeld .... digital intermediate executive producer: Company 3
Devin Sterling .... digital intermediate head of production
Michael J. Urann .... post-production consultant: 5100 Films
 
Music Department
Holly Adams .... music supervisor
Tobias Enhus .... composer: additional music
Mary Ramos .... music supervisor
H. Scott Salinas .... additional score
H. Scott Salinas .... composer: additional music
H. Scott Salinas .... music editor
 
Transportation Department
Brett Ainslie .... production driver (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Andrea Alamo .... assistant production office coordinator
Chad Cohen .... insurance: D.R. Reiff and Associates
Nicole Compas .... production counsel: Gray Krauss Des Rochers
Morgan Davis .... intern
Chris Dimoulas .... assistant: Mr. Louiso
James Dutch .... additional production assistant
Jacob Garfinkel .... intern
Jonathan Gray .... production counsel: Gray Krauss Des Rochers
Wyatt Gulash .... intern
Anthony J. Haidar .... intern
Will Hart .... additional production assistant
Josh Kleinman .... intern (as Joshua Kleinman)
James Malloy .... additional production assistant
Jeffrey Marvin .... production accountant
Ruby Masters .... additional script supervisor
James O'Connor .... production assistant
Linda Peckel .... location manager (as Linda J. Peckel)
Caryl Pierre .... production coordinator
Todd Rawiszer .... production assistant
Julie Robinson .... script supervisor (as Julie Robinson Lyman)
Julie Robinson .... production assistant
Jill Sacco .... key set production assistant
Zachary Smith .... location assistant
Sarah Stoecker .... production assistant
 
Thanks
Walter Bernstein .... thanks
Todd Graff .... thanks
Arye Gross .... thanks
Michael Gross .... thanks
Doug Hughes .... thanks
Ravi Kapoor .... thanks
Christine Lahti .... thanks
Tony Lipp .... thanks
Christopher McQuarrie .... thanks
Mary Kay Place .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for language and sexual content
Runtime:
95 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The title is a reference to a Groucho Marx song of the same name.See more »
Movie Connections:
Features Duck Soup (1933)See more »
Soundtrack:
Make Something GoodSee more »

FAQ

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4 out of 8 people found the following review useful.
I cannot adequately describe how much I wanted to love this movie, but I must be honest: it did not get me involved., 2 February 2013
Author: TheUnknown837-1 from United States

By this point in time, everybody is drooling over Melanie Lynskey's performance in "Hello I Must Be Going." I am too. But my admiration does not end strictly with her work in this ambitious little movie; there is a lot of due credit owed to her co-stars, particularly newcomer Christopher Abbott, who plays her much-younger lover, and the insistently reliable Blythe Danner as Miss Lynskey's mother. I guess Miss Lynskey is collecting most of the praise because ever since "Heavenly Creatures" in 1994 and her last appearance in "Two and a Half Men" (one of my favorite shows) everybody wants to see her become a big star. But she and everybody else in "Hello I Must Be Going" is in good form. My only wish was that they were encapsulated by a screenplay worthy of their energy and panache.

I cannot adequately describe how much I wanted to love this movie. Stories about nonconformist relationships interest me, in real life as well as in the movies. And this premise—a woman completely drained over her recent divorce discovering the true meaning of love and of live in her affair with a younger man—sounds like an absolute winner. Unfortunately, most of the fun and all of the really tender moments are collected in the first 25 minutes and the final 10; these wonderful bits, where I felt my heart strings being yanked on, sandwich a lot of padded-out detritus. And a lot of genuinely unfunny jokes. For instance: when will the romantic comedy genre ever give up on the gag where an elderly woman walks in upon a couple while they are skinny dipping? It wasn't funny when it happened to Campbell Scott and Julia Roberts in "Dying Young" 21 years ago, and it certainly is not funny here.

I cannot deny that the movie has great ambitions: it doesn't want to be just a love story; it wants to make some subtle yet true observations about life. Both Miss Lynskey and Mr. Abbott, in the course of their on-screen relationship, embark on an emotional journey, guiding them to realizing the emptiness surrounding them. A key moment in the picture is when they are having dinner with each other's families, and both are indirectly being put on the hot spot: Miss Lynskey's divorce keeps getting brought up, and Mr. Abbott's self-hated career in stage acting is the only dinner conversation his mother can think of. And then there is the final ten minutes, including a wonderful and entirely honest sequence about marriage, set in a New York diner. And I must commend screenwriter Sarah Koskoff for having the guts to write an ending in which not all of the bows are tied, not every character makes their amends.

The remarkable thing, however, is that Miss Lynskey and Mr. Abbott do not spend nearly as much time together as you would imagine. And many of their moments are punctuated by sex scenes—oh, boy, am I getting sick and tired of those as well! Thankfully, they are photographed very quick, but they do not seem to register an erotic or emotional effect. I suppose the idea was that the two characters used the sex to fill the voids in their own lives, but surely there are better ways for characters to bond. I personally am more interested in movie-couples who do not jump into bed (or into the backseat of a car, in this case) two days after they first lay eyes on one another. And after a while, good as they are, Miss Lynskey and Mr. Abbott run out of interesting things to talk about; they just start screaming at one another. And, closer to the end of the movie, just when we think we are about to get a truly beautiful moment—a reconciliation—the movie has to pull the dumb, somebody-opens-the-door gag which completely stops the scene. Then there's the excess characters: Julie White exists for no purpose other than to drive Melanie Lynskey home from the bar one night; Jimmi Simpson plays a drip so mawkishly pathetic that I found myself looking to my watch. I understand the point of the character: he's supposed to represent to Miss Lynskey what might eventually become of her. It's not the intentions or the acting, it's the writing.

Then there's the other thing that rubbed me raw. Laura Veirs is credited for writing the original score for this movie, but it's hard to appreciate her instrumental work since most of the soundtrack is riddled with about six or seven too many songs. Maybe it's a personal problem; I'm one of the few people of my generation (adult males under 30) who is not particularly interested in contemporary music. But if I saw one more walking scene with a bunch of overblown lyrics thumping away in the background, I was going to start pounding my forehead.

Believe me when I tell you, I really regret having to stomp all over "Hello I Must Be Going." There is so much ambition in this movie and so many really talented people involved. And even though I've faulted screenwriter Koskoff's work, she does show promise: a bold story and some bursts of really good dialogue. As somebody who has been on the set of an independent movie, I know how much hard work goes into making one. I know script changes are constantly being made; there's pressure to get everything done on schedule. And above all, I hate to put it down for the same reason I always hate giving negative reviews in general: I have to admit to a storyteller that I did not like the story they were telling. But I have to be absolutely honest: "Hello I Must Be Going" did not register very much emotional impact with me. Again, in the beginning and at the end, there is a lot of punch, the middle of the movie really drags for me.

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