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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 106 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film

5 hours ago | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The official submissions for the foreign language Oscar are trickling in from around the world. Last year, 81 submissions were released theatrically in their home countries between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015. (This year’s deadline for submissions is October 3, 2016; the Academy announces the accepted eligible films later that month.)

Several Academy foreign committees comprised of members from all the branches whittle down the films to a shortlist of nine and finally, five Oscar nominees. (Last year’s winner was Cannes prize-winner “Son of Saul, ” directed by Lazlo Nemes.) Many countries pick films that do well on the festival circuit as their strongest Oscar contender; others do not.

Politics often intervene: Brazil’s submission was expected to be Cannes competition film “Aquarius,” starring Sonia Braga, but it was embroiled in controversy over filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho’s support of outgoing impeached president Dilma Rousseff. Bruno Barreto’s Brazil selection committee went instead »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film

5 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The official submissions for the foreign language Oscar are trickling in from around the world. Last year, 81 submissions were released theatrically in their home countries between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015. (This year’s deadline for submissions is October 3, 2016; the Academy announces the accepted eligible films later that month.)

Several Academy foreign committees comprised of members from all the branches whittle down the films to a shortlist of nine and finally, five Oscar nominees. (Last year’s winner was Cannes prize-winner “Son of Saul, ” directed by Lazlo Nemes.) Many countries pick films that do well on the festival circuit as their strongest Oscar contender; others do not.

Politics often intervene: Brazil’s submission was expected to be Cannes competition film “Aquarius,” starring Sonia Braga, but it was embroiled in controversy over filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho’s support of outgoing impeached president Dilma Rousseff. Bruno Barreto’s Brazil selection committee went instead »

- Anne Thompson

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Pablo Larraín's Jackie to screen at New York Film Festival by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-09-28 14:20:32

28 September 2016 6:20 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Natalie Portman as First Lady Jackie Kennedy

The New York Film Festival has announced that it will have a special Us première presentation of Pablo Larraín's Jackie, screenplay by Noah Oppenheim, starring Natalie Portman as First Lady Jackie Kennedy. The film also features Caspar Phillipson as President John F Kennedy and Peter Sarsgaard as Robert Kennedy, with Greta Gerwig, Billy Crudup, John Hurt, Max Casella, John Carroll Lynch, Richard E Grant and Beth Grant leading a formidable cast. Produced by Juan de Dios Larraín, Darren Aronofsky, Mickey Liddell, Scott Franklin and Ari Handel, Jackie is Larraín's first film in English.

Jackie and Neruda director Pablo Larraín Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The No and El Club director has another highlight in this year's festival. Neruda stars Luis Gnecco as Pablo Neruda with Gael García Bernal as a mysterious hambone detective named Óscar Peluchonneau, and Alfredo Castro as Chilean President Gabriel González Videla. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Anniversaries: Dmitri Shostakovich Born 110 Years Ago

25 September 2016 7:54 PM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

Many consider Dmitri Shostakovich the greatest composer of the 20th century. Born September 25, 1906, he might not have lived past his teens if he hadn't been talented. During the famines of the Revolutionary period in Russia, Alexander Glazunov, director of the Petrograd (later Leningrad) Conservatory, arranged for the poor and malnourished Shostakovich's food ration to be increased. Shostakovich's Symphony No. 1, his graduation exercise for Maximilian Steinberg's composition course at the Conservatory, was completed in 1925 at age 19 and was an immediate success worldwide. He was The Party's poster boy; his Second and Third Symphonies unabashedly subtitled, respectively, "To October". (celebrating the Revolution) and "The First of May". (International Workers' Day).

His highly emotional harmonic language is simultaneously tough yet communicative, but his expansion of Mahlerian symphonic structure, dissonances, sardonic irony, and dark moods eventually clashed with the conservative edicts of Communist Party officials. In 1936 he was viciously denounced by Pravda »

- SteveHoltje

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The Lrm Interview: Peter Sarsgaard Plays the Slimy Villain of The Magnificent Seven

19 September 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Actor Peter Sarsgaard plays villain Bart Bogue in Antoine Fuqua's The Magnificent Seven

When you go to see Antoine Fuqua’s The Magnificent Seven this weekend, you’ll probably be impressed by how slimy a villain Peter Sarsgaard plays as Bartholomew Bogue, a wealthy man who causes problems for the town of Rose Creek, to the point where they need to call on a team of unruly outlaws, played by Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio and Byung-hun Lee, for help. (We’ll have interviews with the latter two very soon.)

It’s not the first time that Sarsgaard has played a bad guy, since he did play Hector Hammond in the unfortunate attempt to bring Green Lantern to the big screen. But before that, Sarsgaard has starred in a mix of indie and studio movie that established himself as one of the great supporting character actors. »

- Edward Douglas

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Tiff 2016: Natalie Portman is Exceptional in Pablo Larraín's 'Jackie'

18 September 2016 10:49 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

It's never a good time to lose anyone close to you and even worse when the whole world is watching. Every move is watched and scrutinized regardless of context and it's up to you to put your personal feelings aside and keep moving forward. The astounding new film Jackie focuses on one of the biggest icons of class and style in America's history, Jackie Kennedy, and as played by a never-better Natalie Portman we witness the private grief that is human but rarely seen in public. Jackie is the English-language debut of Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larraín (of No, The Club and this year's Neruda) and as the story begins we are dropped right in the middle of the chaotic aftermath following JFK's assassination on November 22, 1963. Jackie Kennedy is still in a daze wandering the empty halls of the White House and it hasn't even sunk in yet that her »

- Marco Cerritos

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‘Jackie,’ ‘Blind Christ’ Make Big Splashes for Burgeoning Chilean Film Business

13 September 2016 7:32 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Chile’s unprecedented dual presence in the Venice Film Festival’s official competition, and presence at Toronto, can only attest to the wealth and breadth of its burgeoning cinematic talent.

Venice’s and Toronto’s official lineup included “Jackie,” the first English-language pic from helmer Pablo Larrain, whose pics “No” and “The Club” repped Chile in the past two consecutive years at the Oscars, and whose recent “Neruda” preemed at Cannes and also reps Chile at the upcoming Oscars. The Lido fest also featured a relatively unknown Chile-born talent, Christopher Murray, and his sophomore pic, “The Blind Christ.”

Darren Aronofsky’s search for someone to direct the long-gestating “Jackie” project ended when he saw Larrain’s Berlinale grand jury prizewinner “The Club” while presiding over the Berlin festival jury last year. Natalie Portman, who plays the titular role of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy during the first four days after the assassination of her husband, »

- Anna Marie de la Fuente

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As ‘Jackie’ Crashes the Oscar Party, Venice’s Kingmaker Status Is Confirmed

13 September 2016 10:13 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When it comes to the tricky business of monitoring Oscar-season hype, the Venice Film Festival doesn’t get talked about quite as its fall festival counterparts Telluride and Toronto, or even its European sister Cannes — largely because most of the journalists whose chief job it is to monitor Oscar season don’t attend.

After all, it’s far away, it clashes with those aforementioned North American fests, and its program is heavy on the kind of hard-art world cinema that many Academy members will never hear of, let alone see. This year’s Golden Lion winner was “The Woman Who Left,” a four-hour, black-and-white drama of ethics and revenge from Filipino iconoclast Lav Diaz — a rewarding challenge, but not exactly the definition of an Oscar heavyweight. (Though some ironic tweets I posted immediately after the Venice awards ceremony were taken a little too literally by media outlets in the Philippines. »

- Guy Lodge

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Pablo Larraín’s ‘Neruda’ is Chile’s Oscar Submission

13 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Pablo Larraín is having a good Toronto festival.

Not only has his first English-language film “Jackie,” starring Natalie Portman, been acquired by Fox Searchlight for December release at the height of Oscar season, but Chile has chosen his “Neruda” as its Oscar submission.

Larrain’s film “No,” also starring Gael García Bernal (“Mozart in the Jungle”), was nominated for the foreign language Oscar in 2013. Written by Guillermo Calderón, “Neruda” is a poetic, literary cat-and-mouse story set in 1948, when fugitive Communist politician and popular poet Pablo Neruda (Luis Gnecco) is in hiding with his wife, painter Delia del Carril (Mercedes Morán), moving from location to location with Police Prefect Oscar Peluchonneau (García Bernal) hot on his trail. Neruda is creatively inspired during this period and plays mind games with is his implacable nemesis.

The Telluride Film Festival honored Larraín with a tribute. 

The Orchard acquired North American rights to “Neruda” (outbidding »

- Anne Thompson

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Pablo Larraín’s ‘Neruda’ is Chile’s Oscar Submission

13 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Pablo Larraín is having a good Toronto festival.

Not only has his first English-language film “Jackie,” starring Natalie Portman, been acquired by Fox Searchlight for December release at the height of Oscar season, but Chile has chosen his “Neruda” as its Oscar submission.

Larrain’s film “No,” also starring Gael García Bernal (“Mozart in the Jungle”), was nominated for the foreign language Oscar in 2013. Written by Guillermo Calderón, “Neruda” is a poetic, literary cat-and-mouse story set in 1948, when fugitive Communist politician and popular poet Pablo Neruda (Luis Gnecco) is in hiding with his wife, painter Delia del Carril (Mercedes Morán), moving from location to location with Police Prefect Oscar Peluchonneau (García Bernal) hot on his trail. Neruda is creatively inspired during this period and plays mind games with is his implacable nemesis.

The Telluride Film Festival honored Larraín with a tribute. 

The Orchard acquired North American rights to “Neruda” (outbidding »

- Anne Thompson

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“Jackie,” Starring Natalie Portman Enters Oscar Race

13 September 2016 8:49 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula announced today that the company has acquired Us rights to Jackie, directed by Pablo Larraín (No; Neruda) and written by Noah Oppenheim, from Ld Entertainment. The film stars Academy Award winner Natalie Portman, Greta Gerwig, Billy Crudup, Academy Award nominee John Hurt, and Peter Sarsgaard. Jackie is produced by Juan De Dios Larraín, Darren Aronofsky, Mickey Liddell, Scott Franklin, and Ari Handel. The filmmaking team includes cinematographer Stéphane Fontaine (Rust And Bone), editor Sebastián Sepúlveda (The Club), production designer Jean Rabasse (The Dreamers), costume designer Madeline Fontaine (Amelie) and music by Mica Levi (Under The Skin). The film is scheduled to open on December 9, 2016. Oppenheim?s original script won Best Screenplay at this year?s Venice International Film Festival. “Pablo Larraín’s “Jackie” is a daring, one-of-a-kind cinematic portrayal of a beloved icon. Led by an indelible performance from Natalie Portman »

- HollywoodNews.com

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Why Natalie Portman’s Oscar Buzz in ‘Jackie’ Prompted Tiff’s Hottest Buy

13 September 2016 7:36 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As expected, Fox Searchlight Pictures took advantage of its first and last dibs on Pablo Larraín’s hot acquisition title “Jackie” to acquire U.S. rights. “Jackie,” which tells the JFK assassination aftermath from the perspective of widow Jacqueline Kennedy (Natalie Portman), was not a Tiff debut; that honor went to Venice, where it was a hit and Noah Oppenheim won for best screenplay. However, it was Tiff’s Sunday night screening where the bidding began in earnest — and with it, the possibility that the Chilean filmmaker’s film would be an Oscar contender. (Chile has submitted his Tiff title “Neruda” as its official foreign language Oscar contender.)

Fox Searchlight will push the film into the awards season on December 9th, as they did in 2008 with “Jackie” producer Darren Aronofsky’s “The Wrestler.” (Aronofsky developed “Jackie” with Searchlight before passing the reins to Larraín.) Other distribs were bidding Sunday night »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Natalie Portman’s Oscar Buzz in ‘Jackie’ Prompted Tiff’s Hottest Buy

13 September 2016 7:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As expected, Fox Searchlight Pictures took advantage of its first and last dibs on Pablo Larraín’s hot acquisition title “Jackie” to acquire U.S. rights. “Jackie,” which tells the JFK assassination aftermath from the perspective of widow Jacqueline Kennedy (Natalie Portman), was not a Tiff debut; that honor went to Venice, where it was a hit and Noah Oppenheim won for best screenplay. However, it was Tiff’s Sunday night screening where the bidding began in earnest — and with it, the possibility that the Chilean filmmaker’s film would be an Oscar contender.

Fox Searchlight will push the film into the awards season on December 9th, as they did in 2008 with “Jackie” producer Darren Aronofsky’s “The Wrestler.” (Aronofsky developed “Jackie” with Searchlight before passing the reins to Larraín.) Other distribs were bidding Sunday night as Portman and other Oscar entrants — including Casey Affleck (“Manchester by the Sea”) and »

- Anne Thompson

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Tiff Movie Review: Jackie

13 September 2016 6:32 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Biopics and retelling of well-known historical events are probably one of the hardest projects for a filmmaker to take on. But after Darren Aronofsky asked his pal, Chilean director Pablo Larrain (No, Neruda), to take on a project about the former First Lady in the days immediately after the JFK assassination, the film world braced for potential. Add the indomitable Natalie Portman to the mix, and you have one of the surprise players of the fall awards season, a personal and at times revelatory movie that never ventures into the simplistic and rarely gives in to indulgence.

In Jackie, written by a surprising Noah Oppenheim (his other features include The Divergent series), we get to know facets of the idealized figure that may have escaped from public consciousness. It’s not just that she explains inside stories like the origin of the term Camelot to describe the Kennedys (her husband »

- J Don Birnam

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‘Jackie’ Isn’t the Whole Story: Why Pablo Larrain’s Films Deserve Your Attention — Tiff 2016

12 September 2016 1:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There are several pivotal moments in Pablo Larraín’s “Jackie,” but one truly epitomizes the director’s primary obsession. Days after she sat next to her husband as a bullet struck his brain, the bereaved Jacqueline Kennedy (Natalie Portman) peers out a tinted window. Even in the midst of tumultuous grief, she recognizes the need to solidify his legacy with an elaborate funeral march. She’s completing his story while keeping her own in the shadows, but in a single powerful moment, the two collide.

With the former First Lady’s reflection on the window, Larraín superimposes archival images of the crowds that showed up to salute their dead president. The intimate experiences of a single traumatized character collide with the public’s absorption of the mythology surrounding her. As viewers, we’re left to sort out the truth.

From the melding of anti-Pinochet campaign propaganda and a scripted narrative in “No, »

- Eric Kohn

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Alfonso Cuarón Readies Next Film, His First in Mexico Since ‘Y Tu Mamá También’

8 September 2016 2:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s been announced that Alfonso Cuarón will be partnering with Participant Media for his first project in Mexico since his 2001 sexually-fueled friendship drama, “Y Tu Mamá También.” Currently untitled, Cuarón’s new film is set in early ’70s Mexico City and will depict a year in the life of a middle-class family. No announcements have been made as to whether there is a cast attached to the project.

Read More: The Films of Alfonso Cuarón, Ranked From Worst to Best

“This film is close to my heart,” said Cuarón in a press statement, “I am thrilled to be making it with the Participant team.” Participant is responsible for notable recent releases such as “Spotlight” and “He Named Me Malala,” and have four films at this year’s Toronto Film Festival.

“Alfonso is a master story-teller,” said Participant CEO David Linde, “We are elated to be joining him…” The film will be produced by Cuarón, »

- Annakeara Stinson

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First Clip for Pablo Larraín's "Jackie" Shows A Woman Under Her Own Influence

8 September 2016 7:45 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Any fears that Pablo Larraín would smooth over the poised spikiness of his Chilean features in order to make a more palatable English language debut were put to rest this week with a rapturous Venice reception for his Jackie, with reviews especially singling out Natalie Portman’s performance as the eponymous First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. For those salivating to see Portman in mid-Atlantic action ahead of the film’s as yet undecided release date, the first clip from the film surfaced quickly thereafter. Jackie follows its heroine through the immediate wake of her husband’s assassination and, in this clip, she slyly pulls the rug out from under Lbj liason Jack Valenti (yes, that Jack Valenti of MPAA fame) in regards to her public role in JFK's funeral arrangements.

One of my favorite aspects of Larraín’s filmmaking is the thick coat of unsaid tension he can paint across »

- Daniel Crooke

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Tiff Critic’s Notebook 1: Neruda, Toni Erdmann, Julieta

8 September 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Pablo Larraín really and seriously screws up for the first time with Neruda. Few saw or recall the existence of his debut, 2006’s Fuga, which received a middling response on the festival circuit; I seem to recall interviews around the time of 2008’s amusingly appalling (and vice-versa) reputation-establisher Tony Manero where Larraín said Fuga‘s indifferent reception prompted him to rethink a rather conventional aesthetic and come up with something inescapably different. Each film since his coming-out has, in variously scabrous ways, dealt with Pinochet’s legacy: Manero and Post Mortem taking place at the moment of his coup, the late-’80s-set No a crowdpleasingly cynical comedy re: the political machinations around the dictator’s removal via referendum. Jumping to the present, The […] »

- Vadim Rizov

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New Clip Of ‘Jackie’ Proves Natalie Portman Could Be A Surprise Oscar Player

7 September 2016 5:03 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Toronto – This is truly a surprise. When Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” was selected for the Venice and Toronto International Film Festivals, but was not invited to Telluride it raised eyebrows. Not only was the “No” director already going to be honored along with a screening of his Cannes breakout and potential Foreign Language nominee “Neruda” […]

The post New Clip Of ‘Jackie’ Proves Natalie Portman Could Be A Surprise Oscar Player appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Venice Film Review: ‘Planetarium’

7 September 2016 2:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Natalie Portman started out playing the 12-year-old accomplice to a grouchy French hitman in “The Professional,” and for a long time after that she was the ingénue — most memorably in “Garden State,” where she did a great spin on that cloying ’60s/’70s archetype, the Kooky Girl. But it wasn’t until six years ago, at the 2010 Venice International Film Festival, that Portman finally changed her image, her trajectory, her aspect. As the possessed ballerina of “Black Swan,” she played an innocent — the traumatized victim of a quintessential stage mother — who was so fixated on becoming the dancer she thought she had to be that she colluded, with hellbent fervor, in her own destruction. She was going to rule over “Swan Lake” if it killed her.

Portman’s Academy Award for Best Actress was sealed from almost the moment “Black Swan” premiered at Venice. But it wasn’t just joining »

- Owen Gleiberman

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

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