7.3/10
302
4 user 34 critic

Dalpaengee eui byeol (2011)

Not Rated | | Documentary, Drama | 25 July 2012 (USA)
Young-Chan comes from planet of snail where deaf blind people live slow and quiet lives. When Young-Chan came to Earth, nobody understood his language and he was desperate. Then an angel ... See full summary »

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3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Storyline

Young-Chan comes from planet of snail where deaf blind people live slow and quiet lives. When Young-Chan came to Earth, nobody understood his language and he was desperate. Then an angel walked into his life. Soon-Ho knows how it is to be lonely and soon becomes an inseparable part of his life. Young-Chan also discovers an amazing world under his fingers as he learned to read books with braille. Hopes began to grow and he dreams of writing a book. However, Soon-Ho cannot always be there for him because of her own problem of spine disability. The couple now should learn to survive alone. While Soon-Ho uneasily spends her first day waiting for his return, Young-Chan goes out for the biggest adventure of his life. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Documentary | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Release Date:

25 July 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Boku wa katatsumuri  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$2,011 (USA) (27 July 2012)

Gross:

$2,647 (USA) (27 July 2012)
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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Must see.
20 February 2012 | by (Glasgow) – See all my reviews

An intensely moving, humbling, but most of all, inspiring experience. At the end I couldn't believe that an hour and a half had passed. I was totally entranced by this sensitive portrayal of these fascinating people's lives. I came to this film with very little knowledge about how a deaf-blind person might be able to communicate, so it was an education. On the one hand (or rather two) there was the extraordinary tactile language of playing each others hands like pianos. On the other, the wonderful state of the art technology which allows books to be read on a braille equivalent of the Kindle. The film-makers manged, in my opinion, to keep a delicate balance between the practical and the emotional. Never sentimental or maudlin, the documenting of the achievement of what most of us take for granted, through loving cooperation, was deeply touching. They have a lot to teach us about appreciation, patience and positivity.


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