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Rust and Bone (2012) More at IMDbPro »De rouille et d'os (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 30 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Waltzing with the West by Anne-Katrin Titze

24 June 2016 6:25 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Thomas Bidegain on John C Reilly in Yorgos Lanthimos' The Lobster and Matteo Garrone's Tale of Tales: "I think he has a secret plan to become a European film star." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Thomas Bidegain known for his screenwriting artistry with Jacques Audiard on Dheepan, A Prophet, and Rust And Bone and Joachim Lafosse on Our Children and The White Knights, met for a conversation on his directorial debut. Co-produced by Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, co-written with Noé Debré, Les Cowboys stars François Damiens, Finnegan Oldfield (Eva Husson's Bang Gang) and John C Reilly with Agathe Dronne, Iliana Zabeth (Bertrand Bonello’s Saint Laurent and House Of Tolerance), Jean-Louis Coulloc'h, Ellora Torchia, Mounir Margoum, Antonia Campbell-Hughes and Maxim Driesen.

Alain (François Damiens) with daughter Kelly (Iliana Zabeth)

David Lynch's Mulholland Drive cowboy, a Bronski Beat Smalltown Boy rendition, James Coburn in Sergio Leone's Duck, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Les Cowboys review – intimate, twisty lost-child epic

23 June 2016 1:15 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In Thomas Bidegain’s skilful directorial debut, a country-music obsessed family travel to Pakistan after the disappearance of their daughter

Hitherto best known for the excellent screenplays he wrote for several French auteurs, particularly Jacques Audiard (A Prophet, Rust and Bone, Dheepan) and Bertrand Bonello (Saint Laurent), Thomas Bidegain makes his debut as director in his own right with this craftily elliptical, intimate epic. In the mid-1990s, a rural family of four enthusiastic country and western fans, who like all things to do with cowboy hats and line-dancing, are devastated when their daughter disappears one night at the local hoedown. Father Alain (François Damiens, touching) spends years searching for her, despite the fact that she seemingly doesn’t want to be found, having eloped with a Muslim boy who may or may not have jihadist sympathies. Kid, her younger brother (eventually played as an adult by a somewhat stiff »

- Leslie Felperin

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‘Les Cowboys’ Exclusive Clip: A Father Looks for His Daughter in Thomas Bidegain’s Reimagining of ‘The Searchers’

23 June 2016 11:05 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Thomas Bidegain has made the transition from screenwriting to directing more smoothly than most with “Les Cowboys,” a contemporary reimagining of John Ford’s “The Searchers.” Bidegain’s updated take on the Western classic stars François Damiens as a Stetson-wearing Frenchman whose teenage daughter suddenly disappears one day, apparently having run off with the Muslim boyfriend her parents didn’t even know existed. Ahead of the film’s theatrical release tomorrow, Indiewire has been exclusively provided with a clip from the film.

Read More: Cannes Review: ‘Les Cowboys,’ Directed By ‘Rust & Bone’ Writer Thomas Bidegain, Starring John C. Reilly

In the scene, Damiens makes his way through the makeshift encampment where he thinks his daughter might be hiding out. She’s not there, of course, but some residents who don’t take kindly to his presence certainly are.

Read More: Arthouse Audit: Starry ‘A Bigger Splash’ and Cannes-Winner ‘Dheepan’ Lead »

- Michael Nordine

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Daniel Battsek to head Film4 by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-06-22 12:49:15

22 June 2016 4:49 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Daniel Battsek with Catherine Deneuve, Charles S Cohen and Clo Cohen Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Cohen Media Group president Daniel Battsek will leave his current role to become the director of Film4. He will replace David Kosse, who is joining Stx Entertainment. Disney brought Battsek to the Us in 2005 to run Miramax when Harvey Weinstein and Bob Weinstein left the company.

Les Cowboys director Thomas Bidegain Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Cohen Media's latest releases are Benoît Jacquot's penetrating Diary Of A Chambermaid starring Léa Seydoux with Vincent Lindon and Thomas Bidegain's soul searching Les Cowboys starring François Damiens, Finnegan Oldfield and John C Reilly.

Bidegain co-wrote Jacques Audiard's Dheepan, A Prophet, and Rust And Bone. He won the Michel d'Ornano Award at the Deauville American Film Festival for his directorial debut Les Cowboys following its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival last year.

After three years at Cohen Media, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Matthias Schoenaerts Protects Diane Kruger in U.S. Trailer For ‘Disorder’

20 June 2016 6:55 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Originally titled Maryland, writer-director Alice Winocour‘s (co-writer of Mustang) second feature Disorder has just received its first U.S. trailer. Selling itself to American audiences as a lot more clear-cut than its U.K. treatment, the trailer lays out the early story beats before delving into synthwave and neon-headed title cards that cannot help but scream, “this has worked before, right?”

Following a solider with Ptsd (Matthias Schoenaerts of Bullhead and The Drop) hired to watch over the wife (Diane Kruger) and child of a wealthy businessman, the film received nominations at Cannes, AFI, Lumiere Awards, and Stockholm Film Fest.

While the film attempts a heady slow-burn, we said in our review: “[The] subtext is interesting, but only carries Disorder so far. A good deal of it stretches on interminably with Vincent looking sad, weary, on edge, or some combination of the three. Writer-director Alice Winocour does a fine job establishing the geography of Maryland, »

- Mike Mazzanti

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Why Cannes Still Matters

22 May 2016 2:25 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway looks at how winning in Cannes affects a film’s box office…

Cannes remains the most important film festival in the world, and one of the most important events of any type (think of an annual event that gets the same coverage and you’re searching for a while). The latest festival ends tonight.

There are three parts to Cannes – the market, where bad movies get sold to international distributors so the producers can finance their next straight to DVD Nazi-Vampire-Kung Fu flick, there’s the promotional part, where young, pretty actresses get photographed next to old directors, and there is the competition.

The top prize at the competition, and unquestionably the top prize at any film festival anywhere, is the Palme d’Or. Does winning it help a film, though?

Looking at films who won over the past ten years – even when directed by »

- Neil Calloway

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The Current Debate: Pop Anthems for Cannes

17 May 2016 3:21 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The premiere of Andrea Arnold’s American Honey at Cannes on Sunday saw the director and cast show off a few dance moves during their red carpet photo-op, in what Vanity Fair, perhaps channeling a Downton Abbey character, called a “charmingly youthful moment.” Red carpet attire excepted, the spontaneous performance apparently fit right in with the film, which includes a pop soundtrack and a dance scene of its own, per The Telegraph’s Tim Robey:Twice, during Andrea Arnold’s rapturously scuzzy road movie American Honey, Rihanna and Calvin Harris grace the soundtrack with “We Found Love”, their euphoric 2011 dance-floor smash that invites you to drop everything, get high and lose yourself. It’s first heard over the tannoy in an Oklahoma Walmart, where main characters Star (Sasha Lane) and Jake (Shia Labeouf) clap eyes on each other, while the latter’s crew of wasters, waifs and strays grab provisions up and down the aisles. »

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Cannes Film Review: ‘American Honey’

14 May 2016 4:03 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mere minutes into “American Honey,” her scrappy, sprawling astonishment of a fourth feature, Andrea Arnold hits the audience with a song choice almost too perfect to work. As a girl’s gaze meets a boy’s across the packed aisles of a Midwestern Walmart, the euphoric Edm throb of Calvin Harris and Rihanna’s 2011 smash “We Found Love” hijacks the busy soundscape, setting a love story emphatically in motion by the time he hops up to dance on the checkout counter. “We found love in a hopeless place,” the song’s chorus ecstatically declares, over and over, as well it might — does it get more hopeless than Walmart, after all? It’s a gesture so brazenly big and romantically literal that it can’t help but have your heart, and it’s such an early, ebullient cinematic climax that Arnold dares repeat it two hours later, cranking up the song again in a more fraught, »

- Guy Lodge

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Stranger in a Strange Land: ‘Dheepan’

13 May 2016 1:59 AM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

The latest film from writer-director Jacques Audiard (A Prophet, Rust and Bone) is a sober, utterly compelling look at a man who flees from his native Sri Lanka—and its brutal civil war—to start a new life in Paris. But this is no ordinary fish-out-of-water story. Dheepan  (the leading character’s name) is a man who is desperate for peace and solace in his life. In order to be granted asylum in France, he finds a woman to pose as his wife; she in turn has already abducted an orphaned girl to pretend to be her daughter. Together, this faux family makes its way to a new country where they don’t speak the language and barely communicate with each other. In time, Dheepan secures...

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- Leonard Maltin

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From Kristen Stewart to Steven Spielberg, Awards Possibilities Abound in Cannes Lineup

10 May 2016 10:17 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Inasmuch as anything can be called “official” in the unscientific business of Oscar-watching, the early-fall festival trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto marks the official start of awards season: Venice, in particular, is on a roll, having premiered the last two best picture winners (“Spotlight” and “Birdman,” not to mention 2013’s close runner-up “Gravity”) in calmly European style before the noise built up on the other side of the pond.

Happily situated in the less frenzied days of spring, Cannes sits at a respectable distance from the mania of the U.S. awards derby. It is, after all, a festival principally devoted to the kind of high-art world cinema that rarely rules the Oscars: For every Palme d’Or winner like “The Pianist” or “Amour” that breaks through to Academy voters, there are several others (“Winter Sleep,” “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days”) that aren’t remotely on their wavelength. »

- Guy Lodge

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‘Dheepan’ Review: Jacques Audiard’s Palme d’Or Winner Is a Searing Immigrant Drama

6 May 2016 10:03 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

French filmmaker Jacques Audiard (“Rust and Bone,” “A Prophet”) brings his customary mix of muscular atmosphere and tense intimacy to “Dheepan,” about a trio of Sri Lankan immigrants making do in a gang-infested Parisian banlieue that is, in certain ways, as much of a prison as the war-ravaged country they left behind. The winner of last year’s Palme D’Or at Cannes, and anchored by galvanizing performances from leads Jesuthasan Anthonythasan and Kalieaswari Srinivasan, it further cements Audiard as a singular chronicler of roiling souls desperately navigating a way out of circumstances that threaten to upend them entirely. Like his other. »

- Robert Abele

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Review: Dheepan, Behind The Immigrant Experience, A Rich And Provocative Story

5 May 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

It begins with chaos: shouting voices calling out in alarm, a cacophony of sound, and a flourish of a camera moving through a thick crowd. It ends with similar sounds and a similar shot, one far less sinister and disconcerting. What happens between these moments is oft times breathtaking in this remarkable film by one of the most celebrated of French directors. Jacques Audiard's career is now several decades old, but it was his 2009 Oscar nominated film Un prophete that caught considerable international attention. His next was Rust and Bone, a film that had some sublime moments but others that seemed both heavy-handed and gratuitous. It is, then, all the more pleasing that Audiard's latest is a touchstone of precision and craft. With an...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2012 - winners and losers

4 May 2016 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

As Cannes approaches, Screen casts its eye back at the winners and losers of 2012 according to our jury of critics.

Screen International’s jury of international critics has long been a strong indicator as to what will take the top prizes at the Cannes Film Festival – and 2012 was no different.

Sharing the Jury Grid’s top spot in 2012 were Cristian Mungiu’s Romanian drama Beyond the Hills and Michael Haneke’s heart-breaking Amour.

Both films scored 3.3 out of 4 and Amour went away with the festival’s coveted Palme d’Or.

Amour was Haneke’s second film to win the Cannes top prize, after 2009’s chilling pre-war drama The White Ribbon.

Beyond the Hills also performed strongly, winning awards for best screenplay and best actress for its two leading ladies Cristina Flutur and Cosmina Stratan. Director Mungiu has another shot at the Palme d’Or this year with Graduation (Bacalaureat).

Tie-breaker

It was a year for ties, with »

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'Rogue One' star Diego Luna on Cannes' Un Certain Regard jury

28 April 2016 7:32 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Juries revealed for Un Certain Regard, Short Films & Cinéfondation and Caméra d’or.

Swiss actress Marthe Keller is to preside over the Un Certain Regard jury at the upcoming Cannes Film Festival (May 11-22). Keller is still perhaps best known for her role opposite Dustin Hoffman in Marathon Man (1976) and will next be seen in Joachim Lafosse’s After Love, which will play in Directors’ Fortnight at Cannes.

The jury, which will consider 18 films in competition, includes: Mexican filmmaker Diego Luno, who stars in the upcoming Star Wars spin-off Rogue One; Ruben Ostlund, the Swedish director of Un Certain Regard jury prize winner Force Majeure (2014); and French actress Céline Sallette, perhaps best known for roles in Rust And Bone (2012) and TV series The Returned.

The winners will be announced on May 21.

Un Certain RegardInversion, Behnam Behzadi (Iran)Apprentice, Boo Junfeng (Singapore)The Stopover, Delphine Coulin & Muriel Coulin (France)The Dancer, Stéphanie Di Giusto (France »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Joaquin Phoenix May Star As One Of The Sisters Brothers For Jacques Audiard

25 April 2016 11:20 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Joaquin Phoenix may become part of the family for Jacques Audiard’s English-language debut, The Sisters Brothers.

Word comes by way of Deadline, revealing that the actor – who has also emerged as a frontrunner for the Jesus Christ role in Garth Davis’ religious opus, Mary Magdalene – has opened negotiations to board the period piece, itself set against the Californian Gold Rush of the mid-1800s.

Lifted from Patrick deWitt’s eye-catching and indeed award-winning novel of the same name, we learned late last year that John C. Reilly boarded Audiard’s adaptation as either Eli or Charlie Steers, the brothers at the heart of deWitt’s western. While Deadline didn’t disclose official details of Phoenix’s potential role, it’s safe to assume he’s in contention for the other sibling opposite Reilly.

Taking place in the Oregon of 1851, The Sisters Brothers “recounts the story of two brothers — Eli »

- Michael Briers

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Win a prize bundle with Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan

8 April 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

From acclaimed director Jacques Audiard (A Prophet, Rust and Bone) and winner of the Palme d’Or at Cannes Film Festival, the powerful story of Dheepan is in cinemas now. To celebrate its release, we have three prize bundles to giveaway including some of Jacques Audiard’s previous films such as A Prophet, Rust and Bone and

The post Win a prize bundle with Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Competitions

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Dheepan review – a crime drama packed with epiphanic grandeur

7 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jacques Audiard’s confident Palme d’Or-winner has a rare and keen interest in its characters – a trio of Tamil refugees in Paris – and an exhilarating mastery of style

Related: Jacques Audiard: ‘I wanted to give migrants a name, a shape… a violence of their own’

There is such exhilarating movie mastery in this powerful new film about Tamil refugees in France from director Jacques Audiard, who gave us A Prophet, Rust and Bone and The Beat That My Heart Skipped. It’s bulging with giant confidence and packed with outbursts of that mysterious epiphanic grandeur, like moments of sunlight breaking through cloud-cover, with which Audiard endows apparently normal sequences and everyday details. There is also something not always found in movies or books or TV drama – that is to say, intelligent and sympathetic interest in other human beings. Every scene, every line, every frame has something of interest. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Dheepan review – a crime drama packed with epiphanic grandeur

7 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jacques Audiard’s confident Palme d’Or-winner has a rare and keen interest in its characters – a trio of Tamil refugees in Paris – and an exhilarating mastery of style

Related: Jacques Audiard: ‘I wanted to give migrants a name, a shape… a violence of their own’

There is such exhilarating movie mastery in this powerful new film about Tamil refugees in France from director Jacques Audiard, who gave us A Prophet, Rust and Bone and The Beat That My Heart Skipped. It’s bulging with giant confidence and packed with outbursts of that mysterious epiphanic grandeur, like moments of sunlight breaking through cloud-cover, with which Audiard endows apparently normal sequences and everyday details. There is also something not always found in movies or books or TV drama – that is to say, intelligent and sympathetic interest in other human beings. Every scene, every line, every frame has something of interest. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Film Review: Dheepan

6 April 2016 10:02 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Jacques Audiard is a strict adherent to the notion of quality over quantity. A career now spanning more than two decades customarily sees "the French Scorsese" spend three to four years in the development of a project. His seventh feature, Dheepan, does not bristle and hum with the same kind of violent magnetism as A Prophet or Rust and Bone but retains their spellbinding lyricism. This is a more subdued, intimate picture, detailing the every day lives of three Sri Lankan refugees who exchange their war-torn homeland for the battleground of a French urban jungle. Though the director makes no ostensible claims of social commentary, this release into the current European climate makes for a timely and pertinent study.

»

- CineVue UK

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Movie Review – Dheepan (2015)

6 April 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Dheepan, 2015.

Directed by Jacques Audiard.

Starring Faouzi Bensaidi, Jesuthasan Antonythasan, Kalieaswari Srinivasan, Vincent Rottiers, Claudine Vinasithamby and Marc Zinga.

Synopsis:

Three Sri Lankan refugees come together to forge a fake a family to flee from the conflict and emigrate to a banlieue in France, where they begin to etch out a living against such harsh conditions.

Under the pseudonym of Dheepan, former Tiger Tamil fighter (portrayed by Jesuthasan Antonythasan a former real life counterpart), whose family has been killed amidst the conflict, aligns himself with Yalini (Kalieaswari Srinivasan). Yalini has taken nine-year-old orphan Illayaal (Claudine Vinasithamby) as her biological daughter, and the three make haste for Europe.

Akin to Jacques Audiard’s prior work (Rust and Bone, A Prophet) the film is at a slow, melancholic pace to allow the audience to be immersed. The issues of cultural integration are downplayed to allow the trio to convey their multi-faceted characteristics, »

- Matthew Lee

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