A depressed Betty tries to make things uncomfortable for Don and Megan, Roger tries to take out some secret weapons for a meeting with a prospective Jewish client, and Don makes a snap judgment that angers the creative department.

Director:

Writers:

(created by),
Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
Lane Pryce (credit only)
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Edit

Storyline

Betty is going to Weight Watchers to deal with her weight issue. Whether she wants to admit it or not, she is aware that her envy of Megan is part of her unhappiness and associated eating and weight gain. After an incident with Megan (of which Megan herself is unaware), Betty decides to use Sally as a pawn, which places Sally, Don and Megan in the middle of Betty's game, of which only Don seems aware. At the office, Roger is hustling for the Manischewitz wine account to show that he, beyond financing the company, is still useful in a day-to-day sense, and to show that Pete, who has lined up a potential major New York Times article featuring SCDP, is not the SCDP wunderkind he makes himself out to be. Roger's plan, the creatives for which he plans to pawn off as his own to the clients, includes the use of both Jane and Ginsberg, which doesn't sit well with Peggy or ultimately with Jane. And Don decides to go back into the creative realm, coming up with an idea at a brainstorming ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

13 May 2012 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The line "Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!" that Ginsburg quotes is from the poem 'Ozymandias' by Percy Bysshe Shelley. And as suggested by the character Stan Rizzo, he is missing the thrust of the meaning. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of this episode, Don Draper is seen checking colour proofs of ads. However, digital proofs of the kind were most definitely not available in 1966. He should have been looking at Cromalin or Geva analog proofs. See more »

Quotes

Peggy Olson: Am I the only one who can work and drink at the same time?
See more »

Connections

References Dark Shadows (1966) See more »

Soundtracks

Sweepin' the Clouds Away
(uncredited)
Music & lyrics by Sam Coslow
Performed by Maurice Chevalier
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Something seems to be building here
14 May 2012 | by (Massachusetts, USA) – See all my reviews

It surprised me a little that the "Dark Shadows" episode was set in November 1966. The series is definitely moving at a fast pace. But we finally get to see a episode focused more on Betty Francis, as well as her husband, Henry. We also learn that Roger Sterling's soon-to-be-ex is Jewish. And we get to see more drama unfold when Sally learns of Don Draper's first wife, Anna.

Oddly, the references to the TV shows of the day in Season 5 seem to be death related: Don Draper's calling his ex-wife and her husband "Morticia" and "Lurch" in the opener, a reference to "The Addams Family": and then to "Dark Shadows," which began broadcasting in June 1966. In this episode, Megan is scornful of the Gothic soap opera, and she had some justification: ABC had many soaps, such as "The Young Marrieds," which came and went frequently, and it looked like "Dark Shadows" would become another statistic. It was doing very badly in the ratings.

But the actress whom Megan seems scornful of would have the last laugh, because she gets the part for the show. And five months later, Jonathan Frid's character of Barnabas Collins debuts, turning the show around, and allowing it to remain on the air until April 1971.

And yes, it is ironic that this episode came out when the movie version of "Dark Shadows" did, and one month after the passing of Mr. Frid.

Beyond that, the episode adds to the notion that something is building here. Some have speculated that one of the major characters may pass away, but that remains to be seen. We do know that something seems to be brewing up ...


6 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
about the very ending jakholman
major question: What happened to the woman Don killed? citymanguy
I hate Jane Mias1208
Hamm In A Role doug65oh
I miss this show so much miseducation78
I love Mrs. Blankenship Jwink72
Discuss Dark Shadows (2012) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page