7.4/10
386
5 user 21 critic

Last Call at the Oasis (2011)

PG-13 | | Documentary | 4 May 2012 (USA)
Trailer
2:11 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Amazon Video

A documentary on the world's water crisis.

Director:

Writers:

(inspired by the book "The Ripple Effect" by),
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Wars of the future will be fought over water as they are over oil today, as the source of human survival enters the global marketplace and political arena. Corporate giants, private ... See full summary »

Director: Sam Bozzo
Stars: Jim Olson, Tony Clarke, Maude Barlow
DamNation (2014)
Documentary | Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

This powerful film odyssey across America explores the sea change in our national attitude from pride in big dams as engineering wonders to the growing awareness that our own future is ... See full summary »

Directors: Ben Knight, Travis Rummel
Stars: Edward Abbey, Bruce Babbitt, Lori Bodi
Documentary | Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there's a company which has developed the art to perfection - Nestlé. This company dominates the global... See full summary »

Director: Urs Schnell
Stars: Peter Brabeck, Res Gehriger, Hanspeter Müller
Documentary | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A future archivist looks at old footage from the year 2008 to understand why humankind failed to address climate change.

Director: Franny Armstrong
Stars: Pete Postlethwaite, Jeh Wadia, Alvin DuVernay
Documentary | Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Dole Food Company wages a campaign to prevent a pair of Swedish film-makers from showing their documentary about a lawsuit against the company.

Director: Fredrik Gertten
Stars: Fredrik Gertten, Alex Rivera, Alfonso Allende
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Most of us don't know where their money is. However, one thing is for certain, it's is not in the bank to which we entrusted it. The bank and our money is already a part of the cycle of the global money market.

Director: Erwin Wagenhofer
Stars: Mark Mobius, Mirko Kovats, K. Sujatha Raaju
Tapped I (2009)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Examines the role of the bottled water industry and its effects on our health, climate change, pollution, and our reliance on oil.

Directors: Stephanie Soechtig, Jason Lindsey
Stars: Sally Bethea, Earl Blumenauer, Amanda Brown
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A feature-length documentary about the history and future of nuclear power. The film explores how and why mankind's most feared and controversial technological discovery is now passionately... See full summary »

Director: Robert Stone
Stars: Stewart Brand, Gwyneth Cravens, Mark Lynas
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Director Chris Paine takes his film crew behind the closed doors of Nissan, GM, and the Silicon Valley start-up Tesla Motors to chronicle the story of the global resurgence of electric cars.

Director: Chris Paine
Stars: Tim Robbins, Dan Neil, Danny DeVito
Misconception I (2014)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  
Director: Jessica Yu
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A documentary that investigates the birth and death of the electric car, as well as the role of renewable energy and sustainable living in the future.

Director: Chris Paine
Stars: Martin Sheen, Tom Hanks, Mel Gibson
Documentary | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

An investigative documentary about the epidemic of rape of soldiers within the US military.

Director: Kirby Dick
Stars: Amy Ziering, Kirby Dick, Kori Cioca
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Tim Barnett ...
Himself - Scripps Researcher
...
Herself - Legal Consultant (as Erin Brockovich)
...
Himself - UC Center for Hydrologic Modeling
...
Ms. Sanchez (archive footage)
Peter H. Gleick ...
Himself - Pacific Institute (as Peter Gleick)
Robert Glennon ...
Himself
Tyrone Hayes
Pat Mulroy ...
Herself - Southern Nevada Water Authority
Edit

Storyline

A documentary on the world's water crisis.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

You drink it, you swim in it, you survive on it. It's time you knew the truth about it.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some disturbing content and brief strong language
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 May 2012 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$8,899 (USA) (4 May 2012)

Gross:

$40,846 (USA) (18 May 2012)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Sounding the Alarm about an impending Water Crisis
14 March 2012 | by (Austin, TX, United States) – See all my reviews

Last Call at the Oasis was very well-received at Austin's SXSW Film Festival. This is hardly surprising since Austin has a reputation as an environmentally conscience city and all of Texas has been suffering from a drought. The film is a very well-organized and sophisticated presentation about the problems around water both in the U.S. and internationally. In doing so the filmmakers (some of whom worked on the excellent film Food, Inc.) are drawing attention to a subject that is rarely discussed. They discuss a whole range of issues including the future shortage of fresh water, effects of climate change, environmental water pollution by industrial polluters, pollution caused by pesticides, and the privatization of water through the bottled water industry. They offer a number of solutions including conservation and behavioral change, water recycling, repairs to the water infrastructure, more efficient agriculture, and somewhat less enthusiastically desalinization. They use a wide range of footage from around the U.S., Australia, and the Middle East. The presentation between different issues and places flow together quite seamlessly. The film is a wake-up call on an issue that is often politically invisible. While solutions exist, they make clear that what is absent is the political will to address a serious long-term problem that hasn't penetrated the popular consciousness. Like so many other issues, politicians don't want to think about it if it doesn't have any immediate consequences for their next re-election.

The film is impressive and a bit terrifying. This is both a weakness and a strength. They are attempting to draw attention to an important issue that is being widely ignored, but at the same time they seem to fall into the alarmist tone of impending doom that is often – some would say too often - heard from the environmental movement. I've heard academic scholars (particularly those who study the Middle East) talk about future water wars and an impending water crisis for more than 20 years and somehow the crisis never quite arrives. Sometimes creating a little fear is necessary to promote political and behavioral change, but it can also lead to despair, anger, and frustration. This approach can also undermine the credibility of the doom-sayers if they appear to be crying wolf about a crisis that never arrives. Either way, Last Call at the Oasis is a valuable and informative presentation that many Americans need to hear about since this issue isn't even on most of our political radar screens yet.


13 of 15 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Last Call at the Oasis (2011) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?