7.6/10
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41 user 96 critic

Side by Side (2012)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 22 August 2012 (USA)
Trailer
1:47 | Trailer

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The documentary investigates the history, process and workflow of both digital and photochemical film creation.

Director:

(as Chris Kenneally)

Writer:

(as Chris Kenneally)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

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Geoff Boyle ...
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Don Ciana ...
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Gary Einhaus ...
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Jonathan Fawkner ...
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Storyline

Investigates the history, process and workflow of both digital and photochemical film creation. It shows what artists and filmmakers have been able to accomplish with both film and digital and how their needs and innovations have helped push filmmaking in new directions. Interviews with directors, cinematographers, colorists, scientists, engineers and artists reveal their experiences and feelings about working with film and digital. Where we are now, how we got here and what the future may bring. Written by aolse9

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

a documentary about the science, art, and impact of digital cinema

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 August 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Celuloidno i digitalno  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$6,956 (USA) (17 August 2012)

Gross:

$28,592 (USA) (31 August 2012)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV) (2012)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Identifies District 9 as being shot on the Sony F23. It was actually shot on Red One cameras. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Keanu Reeves: Since the late 1880s, visual artists and storytellers have used moving images to create amazing works. Movies have inspired us, thrilled us, and captured our imaginations. Film has helped us share our experiences and dreams. Photochemical film has been the exclusive format used to capture, project, and store moving images for over 100 years. It is only recently that new technology has emerged that is challenging film's place as the gold standard for quality and workflow. Digital ...
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Connections

Features Apocalypse Now (1979) See more »

Soundtracks

Just Hummingbirds
Written by Mark Wike, Bill Ryan and Brendan Ryan
Performed by Mad Larry
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User Reviews

 
An Excellent Look at Cinema's Future
3 June 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The documentary investigates the history, process and workflow of both digital and photochemical film creation.

Keanu Reeves says that digital "could" replace traditional film. However, by 2012, I am fairly confident that there was no "could" -- digital had become the more common way to shoot a film. (Although, this may be more on the low budget end -- they offer plenty of big name films from the last five years that are still on film.)

I appreciated learning that digital cameras not only affect the finished product, but actually the process, too -- even the actors. The natural breaks of switching rolls every ten or so minutes are removed, which results in Robert Downey's mason jars of urine.

The rise of CGI is covered, which is both a good and bad thing. Bad CGI is far too common and a weak replacement for practical effects. But good CGI is a major boon, and as the industry progresses, this could result in some impressive things.

Digital as a whole is growing and evolving -- we learn of David Fincher's role of making cameras lighter during "Social Network". We learn that "Slumdog Millionaire" was the first digital film to earn an Oscar for cinematography (but certainly not the last). George Lucas seems overly enthusiastic about the rise of the digital movie, and we all know how he has abused computer technology. But his overall point is right -- we are at the beginning of a new technology, and only by jumping aboard ship will it get better.

I do love that everyone thinks 3-D will burn out, as it is a joke or a gimmick for money. Could not agree more.


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