Scene I: Mabel and her old father, the factory workers. Scene II: The Foreman annoys Mabel. It is 7 o'clock in the morning. The last whistle has just blown and in a few moments the silent ... See full summary »
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Scene I: Mabel and her old father, the factory workers. Scene II: The Foreman annoys Mabel. It is 7 o'clock in the morning. The last whistle has just blown and in a few moments the silent mill will awaken with the roar of many whirling looms not to cease its noise until the final 6 o'clock whistle releases its tired workers from their day's labor. Outside the entrance to one of the loom rooms stands the foreman checking off the workers as they arrive. Here they come, boys and girls, young and old, all prepared for a hard and strenuous day's work. Here comes the old father. He greets the foreman. Last of all comes Mabel, for she hates to go from the bright spring sunshine into the stuffy loom room. The foreman follows her with greedy eye. He calls her back and attempts to arrange a meeting. She indignantly repulses him and enters the door. The foreman turns with a muttered curse. The mill owner and his son drive up and after passing a word of greeting to the foreman enter the mill. The... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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30 July 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Holds the breathless interest of the audience
7 December 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A Kalem drama which is set in a new field for that company. Hitherto they have been operating with a Southern background, but in this drama they have gone to New England and have taken life in a New England factory town as the basis of their new play. It is a story of evil passion, scheming ambition, innocent love, with a triumph for the innocent and pure love. There are exciting scenes of attempted attention on the part of a foreman of the mill, which is repulsed by the girl, then enters a scheming niece who wants the son of the mill owner for her husband and together they work up a plot to have the mill girl, whom the son loves, accused of robbery. It all works well until the time of the arrest, and then the denouement brings the plotters to justice and gives Mabel to Ned, with the full consent of Ned's father. The dramatic possibilities are fully developed and the play holds the breathless interest of the audience from the beginning to the happy ending. There is no death scene to shroud it in gloom and the leading away of the culprits seems the right thing to do, hence one rises from seeing this picture with a greater degree of satisfaction because it has no gloomy suggestion to make one wish one had not seen it. The Kalem dramas are alive. That much has been proved many times, and while the photographic quality is not always up to the highest standard, the plays themselves are frequently good enough to compensate for any loss in this respect. - The Moving Picture World, August 14, 1909


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