6.2/10
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Resolution (2012)

Not Rated | | Horror, Mystery, Thriller | 23 January 2013 (USA)
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A man imprisons his estranged junkie friend in an isolated cabin in the boonies San Diego to force him through a week of sobriety, but the events of that week are being mysteriously manipulated.

Directors:

, (as Aaron Scott Moorhead)

Writer:

1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Michael Danube
...
Chris Daniels
...
Jennifer Danube
...
Billy (as Kurt Anderson)
Skyler Meacham ...
Micah
Josh Higgins ...
Ted Tellensworth
...
Charles
...
Carmel Benson ...
Sara
...
Justin the Level 3 UFO Cult Member
Aaron Moorhead ...
Level 2.5 UFO Cult Member
...
Dave the Level 1 UFO Cult Member (as David Clarke Lawson Jr.)
Glen Roberts ...
Charles' Friend 1
Bob Low ...
Charles' Friend 2
Michael Felker ...
White Trash Kid With Soldering Iron
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Storyline

Soon-to-be-a-dad Michael makes a last ditch effort to save his longtime but addicted friend Chris from a foreseeable drug related death. Visiting Chris and handcuffing him to an exposed plumbing pipe, Michael forces his buddy into detox, but while watching over his friend he also discovers that all is not right within the territory Chris has drifted into. Situated on Indian Reservation land, the area seems to attract a number of strange people. Someone or some thing has a longtime interest in recording activities in the area, all captured on a variety of recording devices (CDs, film, phonographs, etc.). Michael comes to understand he's been pulled into the latest "story" of an unseen entity, one with a grizzly resolution projected for him and his pal unless they can possibly work out their own agreeable alternate ending. Written by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

23 January 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Feloldozás  »

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A hand drawn picture of the front cover of the necronomicon from the evil dead series can be seen hanging on the wall to the right of Michael's mattress. See more »

Quotes

Byron: The people come here, Michael, to look for aliens, ghosts, and cults, and gateways to hell, secret military bases looking into other dimensions. I think, if there IS something, it is not none of these things - or perhaps all of them.
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Soundtracks

Stoneback Ridge
Written by Dan Martinez
Performed by Karl Kerfoot, Dan Martinez, Jake Reed
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User Reviews

A young man tries to bring his friend back to reality, only to find that "reality" is not just open to interpretation, but malleable and ever-changing.
18 December 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

In spite of some worn clichés -mysterious found footage, missing researchers, and a mystic medicine cabin obligatorily set on an Indian reservation, with Resolution, independent writer/director Justin Benson brings us a breath of fresh air. The film is technically adept on its small budget, and presents a real genre-bender of a plot. Resolution builds slowly as a crime drama, becomes a psychological suspension, then morphs into a puzzler riddled with paradoxes. It releases in a brief climax of occult horror.

In the story, yuppie Michael (Peter Cilella) travels to a remote squatters' shack, where his addict friend Chris (Vinny Curran), bristling with firearms and contraband, has holed up, resolved to kill himself with drugs. Michael restrains Chris, and forces him to withdraw "cold-turkey" over the course of a week.

A progression of weirdos make the scene. Chris's low-life cohorts (Kurt David Anderson and Kyler Meacham) drop in, demanding drugs. A tightly-wired Native American property owner (Zahn McClarnon) and his menacing gang show up to evict the occupants. A scheming real estate developer (Josh Higgins) creeps in, mistaking Michael and Chris for the deed-holders, and a doomsday religious cult is engaging in shenanigans a little too nearby for comfort.

Michael strives to maintain control over the situation to buy enough time to get Chris straightened out, and back to civilization and rehab. Despite the threat posed by oddball interlopers, the real tension is yet to come.

Someone...or some THING is watching -and recording everything Michael and Chris do. But how? The surveillance indicates a presence that looms closer and closer, yet Michael can't detect the observer.

Looking for clues, Micheal discovers strange footage shot by a missing anthropology team, then locates a laconic neighbor, Bryon (Bill Oberst Jr.), with an uncomfortably unorthodox existential philosophy. From here the story plunges into perplexing paradoxes. Chris's sleazy drug buddies and the landowner converge for a showdown. Mind-bending events knock Mike and Chris away from objective reality and any sense of control over their destinies.

Resolution is talky, but intriguing. The long-winded plot is better suited for an hour short. Aside from establishing an initial setting and circumstances, the first half of the film doesn't bear vital relation to the engaging concepts of the second. It's still pretty good. Unsettling developments keep us watching. Plot twists reveal a honeycomb of passages down which to venture. Rather than choose one of them and proceed, the filmmakers offer a twisted experience based on the fact that these alternate routes exist.

Part of the fun of Resolution is thinking about the various possibilities and what they mean. In our minds, we DO pursue them, trying to predict the outcome, but just when we think we know what's going to happen, Resolution throws us a new twist. Throughout it all ripples a nerve-jarring undercurrent of menace, indeterminate, and incipient. Mike and Chris's safe return to the outside world is increasingly unfeasible.

There's some subtle cinematic artistry in Resolution which reinforces the exposition. In the scene in which Michael is conversing with Byron, Byron discusses his views about narrative and story. As he explains to Michael, Byron holds a mirror. At first, the mirror is angled so that Micheal's reflection blends with Byron's face. The effect is to project Byron and Micheal as melded together, depicting a dual entity. But Michael cannot see it. Only we can see it.

Byron angles the mirror so that we see another mirror on the wall behind Michael, producing the illusion of endless repetition. It illustrates the concept of how a painter records a scene. There is the scene, and the painter painting it. But there is a larger scene. For us to see the painter painting the scene, there must be another painter, painting the painter painting the scene... and so on to infinity. This is a pivotal moment in the film. Resolution carries distinct, though not fully developed sub-themes about the evolution and structure of folklore, myth and story, and these are tied into the paradoxes.

Filmed in a half-completed lodge under construction, illuminated by hook lamps, and without background music, intimate camera-work increases a sense of realism, almost like seeing a documentary. The technique is effective because Resolution turns out to be all about deconstruction and the plastic nature of reality. By the time we realize this, we've accepted the actuality of what's transpired, only to have the drop sheet yanked out from under our feet.


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