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The Turn of the Dice (1910)

The brute instinct, inherent in primitive man, though acceptably absent for ages, will occasionally come into evidence in the life of the world. Such a character is Rolfe, the trapper, a ... See full summary »
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The brute instinct, inherent in primitive man, though acceptably absent for ages, will occasionally come into evidence in the life of the world. Such a character is Rolfe, the trapper, a product of the Canadian wilds, who as the story opens, is terrorizing his pretty wife, a fit of anger to which, notwithstanding its frequency, she is not yet accustomed. She cries out in fear, and Pierre, the sheriff, who happens by on a ride, dashes in. He is enraged at the scene which confronts him, and after stopping the wife-beater at pistol's point, handcuffs him securely. But the eternal feminine will assert itself, and the miserable young woman begs for his release. Pierre yields. A subsequent scene shows us that the sheriff loves her, but she dare not (nor does she) encourage him. In the barroom he comes upon the sheriff playing a little friendly game, and sneaking up behind him makes a cowardly attempt to assassinate him. Luckily, bystanders interfere. Then, out of his rage, he invites Pierre... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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12 May 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A thrilling film throughout
31 May 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A dramatic picture representing a possible scene in a country where men's primitive instincts frequently come to the surface and blot out all semblance of humanity. Throwing the dice for the first shot in a pistol duel is a new idea of fighting to many, but it represents what might be done, probably what has been done many times, and when the sheriff loses a dramatic scene follows, happily interrupted before murder is committed by the appearance of a woman in the case. The cruel trapper husband dies from the effects of a wound made by his own knife and the widow and her sheriff love are commended to each other by the dying husband. It is a thrilling film throughout and will hold the attention of any audience from beginning to end. - The Moving Picture World, May 28, 1910


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