Needs 5 Ratings

Chief Blackfoot's Vindication (1910)

The opening scene of this film shows the arrival of Chief Blackfoot, who announces that he has come to gamble. He is welcomed and subsequently smokes the pipe of pence. The game starts. ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Chief Blackfoot
Edit

Storyline

The opening scene of this film shows the arrival of Chief Blackfoot, who announces that he has come to gamble. He is welcomed and subsequently smokes the pipe of pence. The game starts. Chief Blackfoot loses, first his blanket, then backs his horse against one of the other Indian's and wins. Chief Blackfoot then goes to sell it. At the selling place Blackfoot mixes with white gamblers and soon is swindled. He goes outside with the intention of stealing his horses, but is discovered by a gambler who notifies the rest. Blackfoot is driven away. At the marshal's office Blackfoot vehemently protests against the gamblers to the Indian agent. The agent listens and is about to send the marshal out after the gamblers, when they enter with a stranger. Blackfoot immediately identifies them, but they in turn bring forward the stranger, who accuses him of horse stealing. Blackfoot, infuriated, makes a move for his knife. Seeing the Indian's actions, the gamblers draw their guns, but at this ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 May 1910 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Much of accurate historical value is included
19 May 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An Indian picture of merit, graphically depicting the vindication of Chief Blackfoot, and displaying what might be termed some of the better traits in Indian character, for Indians have good traits. These pictures from the Kalem studio are not only interesting studies of bits of Indian life, they perform a much belated public service in calling attention to some of the good qualities which Indians, in common with other men, possess in some degree. Much of accurate historical value is included in the representation of the manners and customs, the clothing and other personal characteristics of Indians. The public is no longer satisfied with white men who attempt to represent Indian life. The actors must be real Indians and the acting thus become exceedingly realistic. This represents the change in the ideas of the public and the methods of the producing companies. It all tends toward better pictures and indicates a higher appreciation of the standard of excellence which obtains in practically all picture production. - The Moving Picture World, May 21, 1910


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?