Pater (2011) - News Poster

(2011)

News

Metrograph, New York City’s Newest Indie Theater, Unveils Impressive First Slate of Programming

Each weekend we highlight the best repertory programming that New York City has to offer, and it’s about to get even better. Opening on February 19th at 7 Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side is Metrograph, the city’s newest indie movie theater. Sporting two screens, they’ve announced their first slate, which includes retrospectives for Fassbinder, Wiseman, Eustache, and more, special programs such as an ode to the moviegoing experience, and new independent features that we’ve admired on the festival circuit (including Afternoon, Office 3D, and Measure of a Man).

Artistic and Programming Director Jacob Perlin says in a press release, “Jean Eustache in a Rocky t-shirt. This is the image we had in mind while making this first calendar. Great cinema is there, wherever you can find it. The dismissed film now recognized as a classic, the forgotten box-office hit newly resurrected, the high and the low,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes 2012: You Ain’T Seen Nothin’ Yet by Alain Resnais

You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet or if you prefer the original title – Vous n’avez encore rien vu is an upcoming Alain Resnais‘ movie which is scheduled to compete for Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Resnais is definitely familiar with this festival, although he has never won the Palme d’Or in his [...]

Continue reading Cannes 2012: You Ain’T Seen Nothin’ Yet by Alain Resnais on FilmoFilia.

Related posts: Cannes 2011: Pater by Alain Cavalier 2012 Trailer is Great! Cannes 2012: In Another Country by Hong Sang-Soo Starring Isabelle Huppert
See full article at Filmofilia »

New York Rendez-vous With French Cinema interviews with Vincent Lindon, Mathieu Amalric,

Rendez-Vous with French filmmakers - Part One

Vincent Lindon says a line in the film Pater, that states " If it's a film, it is true." When I met up with him at the Empire Hotel at Lincoln Center, I asked the actor, when he first discovered this truth for himself. "The first time I saw a film and I wanted to be him", he answered, pointing to an imaginary hero on an imaginary screen behind us.

"I don't like science fiction," he added, "when it's not feasible, I leave the cinema".

His list of all-time favorite movies includes <a href="/search.php?title=The...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Jodorowsky’S Dune (2012): Alejandro Jodorowsky Movie Clip

Jodorowsky’s Dune Clip. Frank Pavich‘s Jodorowsky’s Dune (2012) movie clip stars Alejandro Jodorowsky. Jodorowsky’s Dune‘s plot synopsis: “The documentary covers cult film director Alejandro Jodorowsky and his 1974 attempt to create a big-screen adaptation of Frank Herbert’s seminal science fiction novel, Dune. While the ambitious production collapsed after two years, Jodorowsky’s team of then relatively unknown concept artists continued exploring the themes and styles started on the project and ended up changing modern science fiction forever: H.R. Giger went on to Ridley Scott’s masterpiece Alien, Dan O’Bannon wrote Alien and Total Recall, Jean “Moebius” Giraud created artwork and futuristic worlds for The Empire Strikes Back, Tron, and The Fifth Element and Chris Foss would go on to work on Alien and Superman.”

This is pretty intriguing. I had no idea another Dune film had come so far along into production and was then canned.
See full article at Film-Book »

The Artist, Michel Hazanavicius: César Winners

Jean Dujardin, Missi Pyle, The Artist The Artist Wins, Jean Dujardin Loses: César Awards Best Film La guerre est déclarée / Declaration of War produced by Edouard Weil, directed by Valérie Donzelli Le Havre produced by Fabienne Vonier, directed by Aki Kaurismäki * The Artist produced by Thomas Langmann, directed by Michel Hazanavicius Intouchables / Untouchable produced by Denis Freyd, directed by Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache L'exercice de l'État / The Minister produced by Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun, directed by Pierre Schöller Pater produced by Michel Seydoux, directed by Alain Cavalier Polisse produced by Alain Attal, directed by Maïwenn Best Foreign Film Drive (United States) directed by Nicolas Winding Refn Black Swan (United States) directed by Darren Aronofsky Incendies (Canada) directed by Denis Villeneuve Melancholia (Denmark / Sweden / France / Germany) directed by Lars von Trier * A Separation (Iran) directed by Asghar Farhadi The King's Speech (United Kingdom) directed by Tom Hooper Le
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Intouchables, The Artist, Polisse: César Nominations

François Cluzet, Intouchables / Untouchable The 2012 César winners will be announced on February 24. The ceremony will be presided by Guillaume Canet; Antoine de Caunes will act as master of ceremonies. Best Film La guerre est déclarée / Declaration of War produced by Edouard Weil, directed by Valérie Donzelli Le Havre produced by Fabienne Vonier, directed by Aki Kaurismäki The Artist produced by Thomas Langmann, directed by Michel Hazanavicius Intouchables / Untouchable produced by Denis Freyd, directed by Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache L'exercice de l'État / The Minister produced by Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun, directed by Pierre Schoeller Pater produced by Michel Seydoux, directed by Alain Cavalier Polisse produced by Alain Attal, directed by Maïwenn Best Foreign Film Drive (United States) directed by Nicolas Winding Refn Black Swan (United States) directed by Darren Aronofsky Incendies (Canada) directed by Denis Villeneuve Melancholia (Denmark / Sweden / France / Germany) directed by Lars von Trier A Separation
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Cannes 2011. Index

Updated through 5/28.

The titles below will take you to the roundups, that is, the coverage of the coverage of each film screening in the 2011 edition of the Cannes Film Festival. Click the names after the titles for our own reviews, whether they be quick takes or longer considerations. And finally, pointers to assessments of this year's edition, made both before and after the awards are announced, will collect at the bottom of this page.

Competition

Pedro Almodóvar's The Skin I Live In.

Bertrand Bonello's House of Tolerance. Daniel Kasman.

Alain Cavalier's Pater.

Joseph Cedar's Footnote.

Nuri Bilge Ceylan's Once Upon a Time in Anatolia.

Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's The Kid with a Bike. Daniel Kasman.

Michel Hazanavicius's The Artist.

Aki Kaurismäki's Le Havre. Daniel Kasman.

Naomi Kawase's Hanezu.

Julia Leigh's Sleeping Beauty.

Maïwenn's Poliss. Daniel Kasman.

Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life.
See full article at MUBI »

2011 Cannes Critics' Panel: Tree of Life and Le Havre Tied for Palme D'Or Predictions

With 14 of 16 members in our 2011 Critics' Panel voting, we naturally had to come to a gridlock. We have a two way tie with four votes apiece for The Tree of Life and Le Havre winning the Palme D'Or and in second place we have Pedro with three votes apiece for The Skin I Live In. We have one vote for The Artist, one for The Kid With a Bike and one person voted for Drive -- which must have crazy Vegas odds. I asked our 2011 panel to submit their winner predictions for the top three prizes and if they wanted to add anything further then we'd mention them as well. We'll have this on a grid shortly, but here is how we voted. Christophe Beney Palme d'Or: The Kid with the Bike Grand Prix: This Must Be the Place Jury Prize: The Tree Of Life David Calhoun Palme d'Or: Le
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes 2011. Alain Cavalier's "Pater"

Updated.

"It happens every year: at least one film from France is in competition that the domestic audience seems to adore but which leaves us foreign journalists, almost without exception, utterly nonplussed as to why it was selected." Sight & Sound editor Nick James: "This year's puzzle is Pater (France), the latest relaxed, personal, made-at-home film from the usually estimable Alain Cavalier."

"There is one fascinating, appalling non-cinema subject that people have been talking about endlessly," notes the Guardian's Peter Bradshaw from Cannes. "The line taken generally is that Strauss-Kahn is innocent until proven guilty, but also an uneasy sense that this sort of legal sensation could never have happened in France, where attitudes to sexual politics and powerful men are quite different. The case gave an interesting flavor to Alain Cavalier's Pater, which satirizes the patriarchal system of political power, and power generally, in France. The film… is a stripped-down,
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes 2011: Pater/Hanezu – review

The Strauss-Kahn factor propels a political drama, while a new Japanese offering is in harmony with nature

For me, in the oddest way, Cannes 2011 has made history. In the 13 years I have been coming here, the festival has always been a closed world. No one is interested in anything but the movies. I have never seen any delegate reading the newspapers, just the trade press published here in special festival editions.

This year, that changed. There is one fascinating, appalling non-cinema subject that people have been talking about endlessly. This came home to me when I saw a knot of people gathered saucer-eyed around one of the TVs positioned around the Festival Palais. Generally, these show Cannes press conferences or the rolling chatshow on the festival's dedicated channel. Not this time. The TVs were showing live coverage of the arrest of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the 62-year-old Imf chief and French socialist
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes 2011: live blog – day eight

All the latest news, reviews, comment and buzz from Cannes 2011, as it happens

7.12pm: A gallery of today's pictures for you, and I'm off. Catherine's premonition appears not to have been totally without merit, but no interplanetary collision as yet. Can I unchain the black cats now? Thanks for reading. It's been emotional.

6.59pm: It's almost time to go, with Xan declaring in his diary that he can feel the festival hastening towards its end.

Just time for everyone's favourite French media pundit Agnès Poirier to cross our path again with a disappointed review of La Conquête, the Nicolas Sarkozy film. "La Conquête is not a film, it is a best of," she says. Might it might make us like Sarkozy more?

6.14pm: On this "I used to be a Jew" business: Von Trier has said before that after his Jewish father died, he was told that this was not his biological father.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes 2011: Pater by Alain Cavalier

From director Alain Cavalier comes the movie titled Pater, another project that is scheduled to premiere In Competition at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. So, we’re here today to have a little chat about the story that will follow “the return of the prodigal son to his father.” Still, it’s interesting to hear that Pater [...] Cannes 2011: Pater by Alain Cavalier is a post from: www.FilmoFilia.com
See full article at Filmofilia »

2011 Cannes Critics' Panel: Day 7 - Aki Kaurismaki's Le Havre

Insert a dog, a shoeshiner by trade Bohemian who takes a stand against the system/local police force to help an illegal refugee in the shape of a child (Cannes major theme this year is about protecting them) and add the trademark Kaurismaki humor and according to the warmest applause reserved for a film yet in the Main Competition and we have ourselves a true contender and audience favourite in Le Havre. We still have some grades to receive, but so far this is jousting with the Dardennes and Malick for the top critic grade average on our list. With a predictable formula, a see it by a mile narrative, climax and conclusion, and a Miracle in Milan-esque sensibility, this charmer's winning cast of a rugged-looking Andre Wilms, a perfectly cast Jean-Pierre Darroussin and Kaurismaki-club member Kati Outinen will surely be Finland's Oscar entry despite the almost all in the French language text.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes 2011: Jodorowsky’s ‘Dune’ Promo Video

One of the biggest announcements this week at Cannes was the news of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Dune, a documentary on the Chilean filmmaker’s attempt to adapt Frank Herbert‘s novel in the mid-’70s. Twitch recently premiered an exclusive video clip from the upcoming production detailing just how insanely ambitious the project was. Fans of the legendary filmmaker would all agree that if he had completed the project, it would strongly stand a chance of being one of the greatest sci-fi films ever made. I guess we’ll never know. Watch the promo vide below.

Also here is the official press release:

It was announced today that L.A. based Snowfort Pictures, Camera One of France and Koch Media of Germany have begun production on Frank Pavich’s sci-fi documentary Jodorowsky’S Dune. Shooting has wrapped in France, Switzerland and the U.K. with filming to continue this summer in the United States.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Key Players in the 2011 Cannes Market: Pathe International

Pathe have Main Comp titles in Paolo Sorrentino's This Must Be the Place and Alain Cavalier's Pater on their product list, but the sale agent might find both titles a difficult sell until they are unveiled to the film critic mass. I'd bet that Phyllida Lloyd's The Iron Lady with Meryl Steep is the most desired item on their inventory list. The Iron Lady by Phyllida Lloyd - Completed This Must Be The Place by Paolo Sorrentino - Completed Monsieur Papa by Kad Merad - Completed My Worst Nightmare by Anne Fontaine - Post-Production Pater by Alain Cavalier - Completed Switch by Frederic Schoendoerffer - Completed The Tuche Family (Les Tuche) by Olivier Baroux - Completed The Well-digger's Daughter (La Fille Du Puisatier) by Daniel Auteuil - Completed Titeuf, The Film (Titeuf, Le Film) by Zep - Completed Zarafa by Jean-Christophe Lie - Post-Production Africa United by
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes 2011: live blog - day one

All the latest news, reviews, comment and buzz from the Croisette, as it happens

.

It's 10.00am: on 11 May 2011 which means that the 64th Cannes film festival has just kicked off. Right this minute, the world's film press are huddled in the Palais du cinema as the opening credits roll on the first press screening of the opening night film, Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris. And in about 90 minutes, we'll know the verdict: is it a new Manhattan or another Curse of the Jade Scorpion? Will this year's fest have been launched with a bang or a whimper?

We'll be bringing you all the news, reviews and reaction from the Croisette, as it happens, right through the festival. My colleague Ian and I will be drawing coverage together in London; we'll be getting regular updates from the team on the ground: Peter Bradshaw, Xan Brooks, Andrew Pulver, Charlotte Higgins, Jason Solomons,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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