Little Mario, the child musician, lives with his old father in impoverished circumstances. The father is very feeble and able to do but little work. Mario is obliged to play his violin on ... See full summary »
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Mario
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Little Mario, the child musician, lives with his old father in impoverished circumstances. The father is very feeble and able to do but little work. Mario is obliged to play his violin on the streets to earn what money he can. One day his father is confined to the home by sickness, and while he is sleeping Mario goes out to play his instrument to secure money for his needs. Going through a park, he sees a gentleman with his little daughter sitting on a bench. Mario approaches them and plays his violin, while a great crowd gathers. Their attention is attracted to him and his playing. She induces her father to give the boy a little appreciation. With grateful courtesy he hastens away to secure a supply of eatables to carry home to his daddy. A crowd of urchins follows him and robs him of his purchases, and one of them runs off with Mario's violin. The poor boy pursues the violin thief and falls in front of an automobile which runs over him. The gentleman with the little girl sees the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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7 May 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It makes too strong an impression
19 May 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Death is not a subject upon which one dwells with any degree of satisfaction. And this film suffers because the author permitted the child violinist to die from the effects of the automobile accident, instead of restoring him to health to become a great musician under the patronage of his new found friend. The dramatic power of the picture is not questioned. Indeed, it makes too strong an impression; but the requirements of art did not decree the child's death. Possibly this faithfully depicts the way of the world, but there is a great deal of unalloyed satisfaction in seeing such unfortunates triumph over fate and develop into important personages. This film would be improved for a greater proportion of those who see it by changing its ending to conform to this idea. And it could be easily done; nor would it mar the remainder of the story in the least. - The Moving Picture World, May 21, 1910


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