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178 out of 230 people found the following review useful:

Everyone at the Rig SIte have the right to STOP THE JOB

10/10
Author: Alaa from United Kingdom
29 September 2016

I am an engineer working offshore in North Sea. I have seen the movie this evening in UK. Is really a good movie, congratulations to all involved you done a great job showing a little bit of ''life in offshore rig''. Looks like in this movie is BP fault but in real world at the rig site everyone has the right to STOP THE JOB if something is wrong or something is going on against the procedures. I have work before in BP rigs in North Sea and I stop the job when I wasn't happy with what is going on I had all the support from the Service Company that I am working for and also BP company understood my concerns. If you are a engineer, roughneck, derrick-man or whatever you are at Rig Site if you think that something is going wrong and against the procedures STOP THE JOB. I do it and I will do again better to lose my job than to see people dying.(Thanks for reading my review)

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69 out of 94 people found the following review useful:

Must be seen in the theatres! (IMAX if possible)

9/10
Author: audiodave_82 from Canada
29 September 2016

I usually don't write reviews but saw mostly negative reviews on here so far and that ain't right.

It is not a perfect movie and it's not artsy, or profound. However it is very entertaining, has wide appeal, will make you laugh, have you on the edge of your seat and might even make you cry. It's a slow build at the beginning but the tension soon rises and you will then be hooked. The effects appear to be realistic and mostly practical made with a production value that appears to be one of the most expensive films ever made (which alone is impressive given it is not a sequel or superhero movie).

Mark Wahlberg works as an everyman lead, but it is Kurt Russel who steals the show. Maybe the performance of his career, and the strongest aspect of the film in my opinion. Malkovich is also amazing as the villain, stealing every scene he is in. The two of them along with the incredible story done with top notch sets, effects and sound is exactly why you have to pay the money to see this on the biggest screen possible.

If you need a film to be a character study or you want senseless action from start to finish then you might be one of the people who is disappointed. But if you are looking for a gripping story with great tension and action that can be enjoyed by a wide range then go see this film.

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50 out of 69 people found the following review useful:

Gripping and realistic, Deepwater Horizon works both as an enlightening documentary and a fun blockbuster.

7/10
Author: Andrew Gold from United States
1 October 2016

Deepwater Horizon is a movie that succeeds on two levels: as an action-packed blockbuster and as an honest depiction of a tragic disaster. It's the story of the BP oil rig that exploded and contaminated the Gulf of Mexico. The way Berg directs the sequence of events is well paced and purposefully developmental for a good chunk of the movie. It takes about 45 minutes before the crap hits the fan, during which we're allowed time to get to know the characters - their quirks, their personalities - so we can empathize with their situation. The stakes feel real, as they should (and were), which is a testament to the directing and the acting. Mark Wahlberg and Kurt Russell dominate in their roles, Russell given the opportunity to remind us why he's one of the biggest stars ever. The supporting cast is excellent, including John Malkovich, Gina Rodriguez, and Dylan O'Brien, who have chemistry and rapport between other characters (Malkovich and Russell sharing a couple intense moments where not a word is said).

The disaster itself is portrayed brilliantly. The tone remains frantic and the stunning special effects work puts it over the edge. Once things go south, it's a nonstop adrenaline rush till the end. The only reason it's not rated higher is because it's merely a depiction of events, nothing groundbreaking or revolutionary in regards to storytelling. But it didn't have to be. This was a tragic event and the gritty realism shown here is as refreshing as it is intense. If you're in the mood for a deeper-than-average thrill-ride, look no further than Deepwater Horizon.

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48 out of 69 people found the following review useful:

Dive Deep Into The Horizon Of Flames

8/10
Author: rgkarim from United States
29 September 2016

What is it about disasters that we enjoy watching? I could come up with a number of reasons, but the bottom line is that Hollywood has shifted to dramatizing former events as a means for more movies. Hi, Robbie K here bringing you another review of the latest films to grace the screen. Tonight we hit Deepwater Horizon starring Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, and a handful of other actors. Let's get started.

LIKES: • Great acting • Over the top graphics • Emotionally stimulating

You might be thinking that I have gone crazy, after all Wahlberg hasn't had the greatest roles. Deepwater Horizon breaks the mediocre streak and drops him into a position that may net him an Oscar nomination. Wahlberg's portrayal of Mike Williams is certainly a heroic one filled with wisdom, strength, and a calm edge that sets the stage for a natural leader. But there is also a realistic side brought out near the second half the screen that balances out the heroic theatrics of Hollywood. Kurt Russell no surprise plays his usual rugged role, making sure to add the hard edge testosterone rush all older actors need to bring. Hudson and Malkovich get A's as well, each bringing the needed involvement to round out the cast. All the extras and lesser billed roles complete the picture as a close oil crew, but much of their time is spent standing around or ducking from fire.

Speaking of fire, the visual effects are top notch in terms of computer graphic imaging. Deepwater Horizon's reconstruction of an oil rig succumbing to its doom is very realistic. For you technical folks, the directors have crafted scenes to mimic the daily operations involved with pumping oil, from watching gritty mud flow through the pipe to the cracking foundation floor. That sound boring? Well those looking for a little more suspense will be impressed when the whole operation blows to pieces…literally. You might be amazed seeing the rig, and its crew, get covered in oil before erupting into a fiery inferno you've seen in the trailers. My friend described the visuals being so good, he felt immersed into the disaster, wanting to duck or dive as explosions rattled the screen.

Of course the real magic to the visual effects are the emotions it brings with it. The various sequences and montages of the exploding metal certainly paints a terrifying picture as you wonder how much time is left until something falls. Now add our characters trying to traverse the obstacle course from heck, feeling horrifying chills run through your body as you watch human bodies hurled through the air and disturbing injuries protruding in gory details. However, it is not all dismay and dread, no Deepwater Horizon has plenty of sequences and montages of heroism that will make you a little proud to be a human…no matter how overly theatrical it could be.

DISLIKES: • Overdramatic at times • Already know the ending • Editing needs work

I'm probably sounding overcritical or nonsensical, but here it goes anyway. Deepwater Horizon is at times a bit on the overdramatic side. As I said, much of the movie will light a fire in your soul that will have your patriotism in full force. Unfortunately, some of these moments are a bit too fake and in your face to get my full backing, primarily making an effort to pan on the American flag flapping in the flames. Even the more heroic moments sometimes get a bit too corny, the overdramatic focus on the camera amid a symphony soundtrack blaring pride. Again, they get the message across and deliver the emotion, it just sometimes gets a little too Hollywood for me.

The special effects and the noble protagonist will certainly spread suspense and awe, but it doesn't help that you know the ending. If you paid attention to the news, you know all about what happens to the rig, and if you choose to ignore history take a look at the trailer. The opening sequence doesn't help things either by telling you the fate of a certain character that further adds predictability to the mix. What does leave in terms of suspense and surprise? Pretty much it is the fate of the crew that held any mystery to me, and that was scarce at times. Perhaps another minor dislike, but still one nonetheless.

In regards to the editing, this one is a tough call to make. On the one hand I appreciate the details they provide about the incident, from the development of the disaster to how they faced the inferno the rig became. And yet, I felt some of it was elaborated too much for my liking. The build up was a little too long and drawn out, making it slightly boring as we waited for the dirt to hit the pipe. As the oil begins to bloom into a fountain the pace picks up, but then hits a very slow, somewhat pointless, standstill at the aftermath of the situation. Yes, it provides realism and rounding out of the characters, but again is a little too extended after all the excitement. They probably could have spared about fifteen minutes, but hey that's just me.

THE VERDICT:

Despite this being the third historical event to get a movie this month, Deepwater Horizon will provide the emotional thrills you want. A fantastic CGI design that's brimming with emotion and suspense. However, the predictability and overdramatic moments fall in line with Hollywood's magic and takes away from the message of the movie. I have to recommend this one for the theater though, primarily for the technological achievements it brings.

Overall my scores are:

Action/Drama/Thriller: 8.0 Movie Overall: 7.0

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31 out of 48 people found the following review useful:

Deepwater Horizon Is Explosive

8/10
Author: Mark Durfor from Seattle, WA
27 September 2016

In April of 2010, an offshore drilling rig named Deepwater Horizon exploded resulting in the worst oil spill in U. S. History. If you've read my previous reviews about Eddie the Eagle, Steve Jobs, The Big Short and Spotlight, you know that it's easy to get caught up in the details of how much of the story based on actual events really happened and how much was embellished or altered to make a Hollywood movie. Along the way, I have made a decision to do no research into the facts of the real-life story and just focus solely on the movie itself. I mean, the movie makes no claims to be a historically accurate documentary, so I shouldn't hold it to those standards. And this blog isn't about movies being historically accurate when they don't necessarily claim to be. It's based on two factors: how accurately the movie is portrayed by its preview, and the likelihood of the movie making it to my home collection. With that in mind, here's my review:

Mark Wahlberg plays Mike Williams who works on the drilling rig the Deepwater Horizon. But that's the third thing we learn about Williams from the preview. He's a husband and a father first. He says goodbye to his family before being flown by helicopter with his crew to the rig. All his daughter wants is a dinosaur fossil. All his wife (Kate Hudson) wants is for him to return safely. Once aboard the rig, an executive named Vidrine (John Malkovich) and others from British Petroleum are more than anxious to commence with drilling. They skip a concrete test and excuse a failed system test. They are already 43 days behind and over budget and will do whatever it takes to not fall further behind despite Mister Jimmy's (Kurt Russell) stern objections. They should have listened to Mister Jimmy because everyone's worst nightmares explode into reality.

Deepwater Horizon marks the reunion of Director Peter Berg and Mark Wahlberg who collaborated on Lone Survivor three years ago. It was nominated for Oscars for Sound Mixing and Sound Editing and won the Screen Actors Guild Award for best stunt team performance. While Wahlberg has been nominated for his roles in The Fighter and The Departed, he's one of those reliable actors who makes smart choices. If you've liked one thing Wahlberg has done, odds are,you'll like them all. Most of them won't get nominated for awards, but they will all be entertaining. Berg is in the same category. He's directed some really good movies (Lone Survivor, Battleship, Hancock,The Kingdom), but none that would really break into a critic's top 50 list. Like Wahlberg, if you enjoyed one of Berg's movies, odds are, you'll at least feel you got your money's worth with all of them.

From the preview, I said that Deepwater Horizon looked action-packed and visually stunning, but that it also looked predictable with pieces of the rig falling apart or blowing up blocking every turn as Williams and the survivors try to find a way to escape. I anticipated 3 Stars but I'm bumping that up to 4.0 Stars. It was exactly as the preview said it would be and it was absolutely predictable; however, even though you knew what was coming, it was so perfectly executed, it still shocked you. From the beginning, there was no doubt about the fate of the rig as not-so-subtle clues were dropped along the way from his daughter's school presentation, to the tie of the executive, to the helicopter ride to the rig. You knew it was going to happen, but when it did, it choked the breath right out of you and didn't give it back until the very end of the movie. It is worth the money to watch in theatres. Though I'm not sure I'll be owning Deepwater Horizon, I will be watching it again.

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26 out of 39 people found the following review useful:

An Emotional Thrill Ride

8/10
Author: Thomas Drufke
30 September 2016

Deepwater Horizon is the first of two Peter Berg directed films this year, and if Patriots Day is anywhere near as good as this film we could be looking at quite a few nominations for Berg come February.

Deepwater Horizon tells the story of the crew members of the rig of the same name in April 2010, when the largest oil spill in U.S. history began. Berg is always a guy to count on with this type of harrowing true story. He has the skills of an action film director while also having the delicate hand for an emotionally powerful touch. And much like the recently released 'Sully', this film is a strong tale about the power of the human spirit.

Putting Battleship aside, Berg has always had a knack for directing high intensity sequences of trauma and thrills. Even taking that note into a smaller scale with Friday Night Lights, Berg is great at managing to balance intensity and emotion. Deepwater Horizon is perhaps his biggest scale film thus far, but it's also incredibly personal as well. It stars Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, Gina Rodriguez, and Kate Hudson. All of them get the opportunity to act in small intimate moments as well as physically demanding scenes.

Usually, it's those small moments that bring the emotions out of me, and that was Kate Hudson here. I feel like she hasn't gotten a lot to do since her breakout with Almost Famous, but this may be the best she's been since. She plays Wahlberg's wife, and it's simply her reactions to the devastation on the oil rig while she's at home, that really got to me. Powerful stuff.

With all that said, sometimes the high octane thrills feel to be heightened just for heightening certain situations. Berg never loses sight of the end goal here, but some 'action'-ish scenes are almost a little too much, considering how contained this story feels. It doesn't take you out of the film, but you will feel like it could have been handled differently.

Like Berg's previous film, Lone Survivor, it does a nice job of honoring those who died at the rig and the families severely affected by the tragedy. It's a powerful film with gripping performances from Hudson and the rest of the cast that will likely lead it right into the awards season come winter time.

+Berg's delicate touch

+Hudson

+Devastating

-Some heightened moments

8.6/10

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17 out of 24 people found the following review useful:

The strengths of "Deepwater Horizon" are its strong characters and its extraordinary attention to detail.

7/10
Author: Dave McClain (dave-mcclain@hotmail.com) from United States
30 September 2016

Peter Berg makes movies, but he also knows a lot about deep-water oil exploration. He'd have to, considering how complicated this dangerous activity is, and how well he handled those complexities and portrayed that danger in his film. Berg directed "Deepwater Horizon" (PG-13, 1:47), the dramatization of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil rig explosion which killed 11 people and resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry and the biggest environmental disaster in U.S. history. A combination of faulty equipment and human error caused the disaster. Methane gas escaping up the rig's pipes enveloped it, ignited and eventually consumed the rig, which burned until sinking into the ocean 36 hours after the initial explosion. The titular rig's owner, Transocean, and its client, BP, traded accusations of wrongdoing for years, while various cases worked their way through the courts – and a lengthy environmental clean-up of the gulf coast proceeded. No one went to jail, but, according to Wikipedia, "To date BP's cost for the clean-up, environmental and economic damages and penalties has reached $54bn." But that's all scientific and industrial detail. This film is mainly a story about people.

Berg (with his screenwriters, Matthew Michael Carnahan and Michael Sand) personalizes the story by focusing on a few key people involved in the events depicted. Master electrician Mike Williams (played by Mark Wahlberg, who Berg also directed in 2013's "Lone Survivor") is a devoted family man with a loving wife (Kate Hudson) and a sweet and precocious daughter (Stella Allen), who's very proud of her dad and his job. Radio operator Andrea Fleytas (Gina Rodriguez) is a young, single woman who has a steady boyfriend and loves her vintage Ford Mustang, even if she does have trouble keeping it running. Both Mike and Andrea work for "Mr. Jimmy" (Kurt Russell, appearing on film for the first time with Hudson, who is his adopted daughter) is the caring, but tough and diligent Transocean foreman on Deepwater Horizon, who often finds himself at odds with BP's corporate representatives on the oil rig.

As Mr. Jimmy and his crew arrive at the rig for their three-week-long turn on board, it's apparent that the departing shift (including Berg, in a cameo role, in which he briefly talks with Russell's character) hasn't done their due diligence in taking care of operation and safety concerns on the rig. While entertaining two BP executives who are visiting Deepwater Horizon (and who present him with a safety award during a brief ceremony), Mr. Jimmy locks horns with BP liaison Donald Vidrine (John Malkovich). Mr. Jimmy insists on a test of the pressure entering the well from beneath the ocean floor. When the test gives conflicting results and the results of an alternate follow-up test complicates the situation further, the stage is set for disaster. The rest of the film depicts that disaster with astonishing detail and realism as everyone on that rig fights for survival and for the goal of getting back safely to their families.

"Deepwater Horizon" is a fascinating, entertaining and inspiring take on a real-life disaster. We get good character development and a detailed behind-the-scenes look at the considerations, disagreements and actions that led up to the catastrophic explosion, but there are a couple problems with all that. Berg does a good job with a combination of dialog, on-screen verbiage and impressive visuals to help us understand the dynamics at play, but it almost seems like too much, and the conversations, with a lot of technical jargon, characters talking over each other and seeming to mumble their lines, and some with various southern accents and some without, combine to make it difficult to tune one's ear to the dialog and understand everything that's being said. However, the main point of this movie is the survival story. Berg had a realistic version of the rig built (including many working components) for shooting. His attention to detail – in the set and in the film's visual effects is nothing short of remarkable. What's more, we care about the characters and the danger they're in feels real. For excellent acting, a well-developed story and incredible visuals, you should put this film on your horizon. "B+"

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23 out of 37 people found the following review useful:

serious subject turned into empty action flick

4/10
Author: deschreiber from Canada
5 October 2016

This was a major disappointment. Despite so much of the story depending on technical details, the movie communicated next to nothing. In the early scenes on the rig, people were shouting at each other, unable to understand each other because of the background noise. However, the audience was made to suffer the same thing, having no idea what people were saying. It turns out they were asking if a "cement test" had been completed, and after some time, after they were indoors and checked with various people, they discovered that the test had not been completed. So why was the audience made to go through the nonsense of not hearing what people were saying? It seemed a ridiculous plot point to portray in such an annoying way. The significance was that the test had not been completed, not that it took a few minutes to find that fact out because it was too noisy outside for people to talk.

Then began a number of discussions about technical matters. Little effort was made to help the audience understand any of it. Even the few diagrams and supposed shots of what was happening beneath the waves were far from enlightening. I think we were just supposed to let us the technical talk slide over us as mumbo-jumbo only engineers would understand. For my part, I began to think I'd rather have been watching a PBS documentary about the incident that so that I would know exactly what happened.

Once the disaster begins, very little effort is made to continue the narrative. There's a skeleton story of a few crew members saving each other and trying to get off the rig, but the vast majority of the time we just see explosions and flying debris, over and over and over, an endless series of quick cuts, each scene lasting only a few seconds, with lots and lots of noise, of course. Despite the action and colour and noise, it all became a tiresome.

At the end of the movie we see photos of the actual people involved in the incident. None of them, of course, looked like glamorous movie stars like Marky Marky or Kate Hudson. The roles required no great acting talent. Did the producers really have to hire big-name Hollywood names to fill those roles (one of the producers was Marky Mark). It seemed to be a great opportunity to use some lesser-known actors.

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20 out of 32 people found the following review useful:

Environmental disaster? What environmental disaster!

3/10
Author: brankovranjkovic from stevenage
4 October 2016

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is a tribute movie about the 2010 BP oil disaster that focuses on the events leading up to and including the terrible explosions that created the oil spill.

It shows the human side of the riggers, as they go about their daily routines. Their thick Texan accents were hard to follow (for me at least), and their dialogue definitely was designed to shows how tough oil riggers really are. The BP corporate management staff on the rig are all portrayed as 'idiots', who were continuously taking shortcuts trying to moderate the project deadline (already overrunning by 43 days).

The first half of the movie was a slow burn, building the characters, which were very cliché. The 'disaster' second half section plays out more like a Michael Bay's noisy action movie, with loads of special effects and the standard 'shaky' cam.

After a while, I actually got a bit tired and bored of all the stuff exploding, banging, and smoky scenery. This movie is more concerned with the special effects, rather than the environmental fallout from the disaster.

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22 out of 36 people found the following review useful:

Oils well that ends well

6/10
Author: bob-the-movie-man from United Kingdom
8 November 2016

"Full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing" could be a summary of this modern-age disaster movie. In 2010 the "Deepwater Horizon" drilling rig off the coast of Louisiana failed in spectacular fashion, bursting into flames and spewing millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico in what was the worst oil-spill in American history. Mark Wahlberg plays the well-respected electrical 'Mr fixit' Mike Williams on the rig, reporting to the Operations Manager Jimmy Harrell (Kurt Russell).

The exploratory project is way-behind and BP are not happy. Big-wigs from the company add support to Donald Vidrine, the BP site leader, in applying mounting pressure on Harrell to press on regardless without all the necessary and time-consuming tests by Schlumberger being completed. Rogue numbers in further tests are waved away as 'glitches'. A familiar story of corporate greed and pressure overriding the expert's better judgment.

When disaster strikes it strikes quickly, with some spectacular and exciting special effects that leave the audience especially hot under the collar. Female support is provided by the comely Andrea Fleytas (Gina Rodriguez), given the almost impossible job of keeping the floating bomb on station as chaos reigns about her. As an audience we are back on familiar ground here from classic Irwin Allen disaster movies such as "The Towering Inferno" and "The Poseidon Adventure". Who will make it, and who won't?

A more telling question here is "Do we care?" and unfortunately for the film, the answer is "Not really". This feels a callous thing to say when this was a real and recent event and eleven people and – as touchingly illustrated at the end of the film in tribute – many of them family men with young kids, never went home again. But film-wise, we only really get bought into the fate of Williams, whose back-story, with cute wife (Kate Hudson) and cute daughter (Stella Allen) we get to meet and sympathize with.

We get a minimalist view of Fleytas's backstory, but only enough to provide a recurring "Mustang" reference. And that's it. All the other characters are just two-dimensional "rig crew": cannon-fodder for the special effects team. The screenplay by Matthew Sand and Matthew Carnahan really doesn't deliver enough heft to get us bought in.

While the special effects are good, the sound design isn't, with much of the dialogue being incomprehensible.

All the acting is fine, with the ever-watchable John Malkovich nicely portraying the corporate head you love to hate. Wahlberg as well delivers enough range to make you forget in this "action mode" that he was also in "Ted". And Rodriguez as a junior lead holds her own against the big guns in what is a creditable performance in a big film role for her.

While "Lone Survivor"/"Battleship" director Peter Berg neatly provides an insight into life on and around rigs, and (via subtitles) descriptions of the drilling process which I found interesting, this comes down to the sum of a tense build up, an hour of frenetic disaster, and then a whimper of an ending. Where were some of the dramatic scenes of conflict in the congressional hearing that the film's opening implies might come? Where are the scenes of ecological disaster and local financial ruin to add emotional angles to the story? None of this is really exploited and the whole concoction comes across a bit "meh" as a result. Not a bad film by any means. But not one I will remember in a month or two's time.

(Agree? Disagree? For the graphical version of this review and to comment please visit bob-the-movie-man.com. Thanks.)

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