7.1/10
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4 user 24 critic

They Call It Myanmar: Lifting the Curtain (2012)

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Shot clandestinely over a two year period, this film provides a rare look into the second most isolated country on the planet held in a stasis by a brutal military regime for almost a half ... See full summary »

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(story) (as David L. Kossack)

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Aung San Suu Kyi ...
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Shot clandestinely over a two year period, this film provides a rare look into the second most isolated country on the planet held in a stasis by a brutal military regime for almost a half century. From over 100 interviews of people across Burma, including the recently released Aung San Suu Kyi, interwoven with stunning footage of Burmese life this documentary is truly unique. Written by Anonymous

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27 February 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ταξίδι στην Μιανμάρ  »

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Trivia

Awarded "Best Documentary" at the 2012 River Film Festival in Padua, Italy. See more »

Quotes

Aung San Suu Kyi: I think politicians who think they've gone beyond being politicians are very dangerous.
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Burma Is Different
11 January 2013 | by (Durham Region, Ontario, Canada) – See all my reviews

Yes, Burma is different. I thought this documentary made that point quite well. It's a fascinating look at Burmese culture and society and the conditions that the Burmese people live in. It makes the point that Burma is still very much untouched by the rest of the world, and it includes some fascinating scenes, filmed in spite of the authorities apparently not being very sympathetic to filming. It's obviously very sympathetic to Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese opposition leader who spent most of two decades under house arrest for her political activities, and she's interviewed extensively and provides a lot of reflections on Burmese culture and history. Special attention is given to the problems in education and health care that the country faces.

At the same time, there's some sense of balance to this as well. It's a little bit like "Kimjongilia," for example, except that "Kimjongilia" was obviously opposed to the Kim dynasty in Korea and the movie itself was almost outright appealing for help in getting rid of the dynasty. This film doesn't demonize the authorities (and especially the ruling generals) in the same way. It doesn't portray them in a good light, but it does at least concede that they do what they do because this is how they were raised, and that they really do believe that what they're doing is right for the country. That sort of balanced perspective, even though it's clear that Robert Lieberman, who made the film, is sympathetic to Aung, gives the film greater credibility to me.

For a pretty good portrayal of a very mysterious and still isolated land, this deserves a lot of credit. (8/10)


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