Properly classed as an industrial film, this is something more, for it possesses unquestioned value as a scenic release, the scenes having been made in one of the most picturesque corners ... See full summary »
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Properly classed as an industrial film, this is something more, for it possesses unquestioned value as a scenic release, the scenes having been made in one of the most picturesque corners of Maine, where the Pasamaquoddy Indians still inhabit a portion of the land once owned by their aboriginal ancestors. Their basketry is vastly different from that of the reservation Indians of the West and Southwest, as all visitors to Bar Harbor know, and these examples of basket making cover all specimens from the tiny work basket to the bushel measure. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Documentary | Short

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16 November 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with Benedict Arnold (1909). See more »

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It shows traces of the aboriginal element
19 January 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

In the list of this week's releases there are two industrial subjects of which the Vitagraph Company is credited with one the subject of this review. To our taste and. we believe, to the taste of the public at large, the percentage of industrial subjects released by the manufacturers might be more numerous. We observe that whenever an industrial subject is put on the screen it arrests the attention and, what is more, holds it almost as markedly as does a feature film. This short film on Indian basket making shows a little industry in progress in the hands of the Pasamaquoddy Indians, who still live in Maine. The photographer posed a number of women making these baskets and a domestic touch is given to the picture by the inclusion of some Indian infants. Finally a person entitled to the rank of chief and wearing a nondescript tribal dress is shown contributing his quota to the work of making the baskets. The picture is interesting in virtue of the fact that it shows traces of the aboriginal element of the population and, moreover, it shows them at work. Romantic Indian subjects are popular with other manufacturers and the public just now, so that the Vitagraph Company in releasing this little picture are timely. We would like to see the very great resources of this company more frequently utilized in industrial subjects for, as we have already remarked, the public invariably show great appreciation of them. This was the reception given to "Indian Basket Making." - The Moving Picture World, November 27, 1909


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