5.4/10
1,945
15 user 29 critic

Price Check (2012)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama | 1 April 2014 (Belgium)
Trailer
2:20 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Peter, a family man who works for a failing supermarket chain finds his life shaken up by his new boss, Susan, who starts to groom him for an executive position. Money and opportunities are within his grasp, but at what price?

Director:

Writer:

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
Lila (as Amy Beth Schumer)
...
...
...
Matt Davis (as Brian Berribbi)
...
...
Matt Walker ...
Mylinda Hull ...
...
...
Edit

Storyline

Pete Cozy is having trouble resolving a happy marriage and family life with rising debt and a job he hates. When his new boss, Susan, a human dynamo, shows up, Pete is pulled into the maelstrom that is her life and made to work harder than he ever has before. Suddenly, money and opportunities come his way, but at what price? Written by CA

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 April 2014 (Belgium)  »

Also Known As:

Basarinin Fiyati  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$2,783 (USA) (16 November 2012)

Gross:

$6,240 (USA) (21 November 2012)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

About 4 minutes into the movie, he drives in the parking lot in a VW Passat, but he gets out of a 3 series BMW. See more »

Connections

References Toy Story (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

The Day Summer Fell
Written by Chris Hollow, Ben Michael, Andrew Tanner, Murray Jamieson & Piet Collins
Performed by The Sand Pebbles
Courtesy of Double Feature Records
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Worth seeing to make you think about life choices
16 July 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I really liked the first hour of this movie--really liked it. I liked the energy of the new boss, played by Parker Posey, (even though she's hard to take in many ways), and the fact that she inspires the just-get-through-the-day-in-a-job-we-don't-care-about office mates to care about their work. She's a Steve Jobs in drive and in treatment of her underlings, and I appreciate that a lot (the good and the bad of that). The whole office becomes glad for what they're getting to accomplish during the workday, which enriches their lives. They get a bonus doubled. Especially in this regard, I enjoyed how Eric Mabius's character (think: Jim Halpert) goes from wasted potential to useful, competent, better-paid worker and better provider for his family. I loved Annie Parisse as his wife. She's a mom, yet (don't take offense, moms!) beautiful, intelligent, sexually engaged, loving, and supportive to her husband. She's a fantastic, caring wife. They have a great, committed relationship and are a good model of a great marriage. And, Pete (Eric Mabius) is, like a few characters verbalize, a good, honorable, truthful guy who's intelligent and competent, but truly humble about himself. He's very likable. I like how Parker Posey as boss over Pete includes Sara (Annie Parisse) in work things and befriends her, almost as a safeguard to let Sara know that even though Pete and she are working closely together and hard on work stuff that she acknowledges that Pete is Sara's husband and not her (Parker's) love interest in any sense. So much positive is going on. The reason I gave the movie a 5, rather than an 8, is because I was so disappointed in what happened in the storyline in the last 45 minutes, both in actions that are taken and in the undeveloped resolution to the mistakes that were made. I'm glad the movie wound up in the end where it did, but I was in mourning for about 35 minutes as a few characters "go off the rails," so to speak. "Uggghhh. Oh, no. Oh, no. Don't become that!" was my response during that time. For me, it was brutal. I always enjoy movies in which good or bad characters have a choice, admit to themselves what the right action is, and then do what's right, even at great personal sacrifice, shame, or loss to themselves . . . out of love and care for others. Perhaps this movie makes the case for its viewers to be better than its characters by showing the significantly muted gains they experience by the film's end.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page