Dick Sterling, young miner, defends Red Fox, an Indian, from the wanton attack of a trio of Mexicans and wins Red Fox's gratitude. The Mexicans, Juan Mendoza in particular, swear to get ... See full summary »
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Dick Sterling, young miner, defends Red Fox, an Indian, from the wanton attack of a trio of Mexicans and wins Red Fox's gratitude. The Mexicans, Juan Mendoza in particular, swear to get even and opportunity for revenge with reward comes when they learn that Sallie Barton, Dick's sweetheart, has located a placer mine. Dick is working the claim for her and they plan to rob him. Sallie has seen them coming through the woods and climbs into a tree to evade them. They halt under the tree to complete their plot and she overhears their scheme and hurries to warn Dick. In her haste she slips on the rocks and hurts her ankle. Her pistol shots are heard by Red Fox, who takes her in his canoe to the camp, where the cowboys are warned and set out in pursuit of the trio of desperadoes who have stolen horses on which to make their getaway. Meantime Red Fox hurries back to the mine and traces the trail of the greasers to the tree to which they have bound Dick, and with Dick on the Indian pony they ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Western

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24 October 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It suggests the majesty and power of the law in punishing offenders
22 September 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A snappy drama bearing the animation for which this house is well known and deservedly popular. The scenes about the mines in the mountains are graphic and characteristic. The intrigue, the intervention of the Indian, the rescue of Dick and the capture of the outlaws are realistic scenes. The turning of the outlaws over to the sheriff instead of stringing them up may not be according to the Western idea of justice, but it exerts a vastly better influence upon an audience. It suggests the majesty and power of the law in punishing offenders, a matter of far more importance than illustrating the summary justice meted out by Western men. Then comes the wedding, which closes the entire picture with a delightfully human touch. The whole picture is well worth seeing, and the producers deserve commendation for suggesting the resort to legal means for punishing criminals rather than by a lynching. - The Moving Picture World, November 5, 1910


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