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The Fifth Estate (2013)

6.1
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Ratings: 6.1/10 from 19,300 users   Metascore: 49/100
Reviews: 90 user | 213 critic | 42 from Metacritic.com

A dramatic thriller based on real events that reveals the quest to expose the deceptions and corruptions of power that turned an Internet upstart into the 21st century's most fiercely debated organization.

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Title: The Fifth Estate (2013)

The Fifth Estate (2013) on IMDb 6.1/10

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2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Philip Bretherton ...
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Ian Katz
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Supervisor
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Otto
Christin Nichols ...
Otto's Girlfriend
Christoph Franken ...
Game Console Hacker
Ben Rook ...
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Storyline

The story begins as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl) team up to become underground watchdogs of the privileged and powerful. On a shoestring, they create a platform that allows whistle-blowers to anonymously leak covert data, shining a light on the dark recesses of government secrets and corporate crimes. Soon, they are breaking more hard news than the world's most legendary media organizations combined. But when Assange and Berg gain access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in U.S. history, they battle each other and a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society-and what are the costs of exposing them? Written by DreamWorks Pictures

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

How Wiki Leaks uncovers the secrets of the World See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

18 October 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The 5ifth Estate  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,673,351 (USA) (18 October 2013)

Gross:

$3,254,172 (USA) (29 November 2013)
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film's title sequence, which depicts the history of news communication, took over a year to create. See more »

Goofs

After Manning is busted and communications between Assange and Domscheid-Berg are cut, Marcus chats with Assange. Then Domscheid-Berg uses Marcus's laptop to chat to Assange. The chat somehow recognizes the change in typing person, reflecting this in stating that the message came from "ddd" / Domscheid-Berg. See more »

Quotes

Birgitta Jónsdóttir: [watching Julian dance] He's like an octopus, he's like everywhere at the same time!
Daniel Berg: Yeah!
Julian Assange: Come on, Daniel, you need space to let your ego FLOW!
See more »


Soundtracks

Know You
Written by Simon Charles Green
Performed by Bonobo
Courtesy of Ninja Tune
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User Reviews

 
Cumberbatch shines in a dull and only occasionally interesting account of the Wikileaks story
15 October 2013 | by (Ireland) – See all my reviews

You know what they say – you wait for a bus and then two come along at once. After causing a media frenzy in recent years, Julian Assange and his whistleblowing website WikiLeaks have found their way to the big screen this year, twice. Earlier in the year, the documentary 'WikiLeaks: We Steal Secrets' was released to highly positive reviews and a lengthy complaint from Assange himself. Now, we have Bill Condon's dramatic (and according to some, heavily fictionalised) account of the history of the now-infamous website and its founder. Similarly to aforementioned documentary, 'The Fifth Estate' has notably been objected by Assange, who wrote to lead actor Benedict Cumberbatch outlining why he shouldn't take the role or have any part in the film. Despite this, Cumberbatch didn't, instead delivering an excellent and nuanced performance that never feels like an impersonation. On the flipside, Cumberbatch is far-and-away the best thing in the film.

That's not to imply that 'The Fifth Estate' is a bad film by any means, it's just that it's regularly flat and occasionally boring. Many have compared it to David Fincher's 2010 masterpiece 'The Social Network' and the similarities do exist (the foundation of a revolutionary website involving two different people who eventually fall out over said site), but the difference is that this film lacks the spark and most importantly, the compelling dialogue of the latter. When making a film such as this centred on dialogue, it is imperative to make the talk as gripping as possible, but despite trying their best, the conversations here are only sporadically attention-grabbing. Additionally, the sequences set inside the 'cyberspace' feel out-of-place and don't work at all.

The film has good intentions and attempts to raise some interesting questions, as it successfully manages not to show favour to any side of the WikiLeaks argument, even going so as far as questioning the film itself, as we see Cumberbatch's Assange dismissing it in an interview. As well as Cumberbatch, Daniel Brühl is very good as Assange's partner Daniel Domscheit-Berg, while David Thewlis is as usual, a pleasure to watch, here playing the best on screen Guardian journalist since Paddy Considine in 'The Bourne Ultimatum'. Overall though, the film is not as good as its star – it's a plodding and unremarkable account of one of the biggest new stories in recent history.


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I loved this film solovoyager
Is this propaganda like Assange said? The_Wrestler
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It does provoke debate dpexecute
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