Everyone, except John Carter himself, knew that Ann Hunt, the young wife the gray-haired woodsman had taken unto himself, had married him merely for a home, and now that their bumble little... See full summary »
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Everyone, except John Carter himself, knew that Ann Hunt, the young wife the gray-haired woodsman had taken unto himself, had married him merely for a home, and now that their bumble little cabin was getting to be an old story, Ann not only became careless about her household duties but her own appearance as well. Her interest in both suddenly revived, however, when her husband brought home a young stranger, whom he had rescued from a deserted shack. This shack, wherein the stranger had taken shelter from a storm and fallen asleep, so he declared, had been struck by a tree that the woodsman and his partner had been felling. Under the fatherly care of John Carter, who actually gave up his own bed and the better part of his meals to his new acquaintance, the stranger grew rapidly stronger and was soon able to be about. The young wife, however, would not hear of his departure. This stranger was to her the one bright spot in the universe and she meant to keep him by her side at any cost. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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9 November 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The imagination is strongly stimulated by this picture
28 September 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A domestic drama of more than average merit. A young wife and an old husband. Probably little harmony of thought or action. She tires of him and longs for companionship more to her liking, and the young man accidentally hurt by her husband supplies it. The old man's awakening is terrible. Dramatically it is one of the strongest scenes of the week. The old man plods away, leaving the cabin far behind. The officers take the young man away, and the young wife, thoughtless, perhaps, in her sinning, is left alone, wondering why her husband does not return. But he plods on through the forest, going he knows not where. The imagination is strongly stimulated by this picture, so simple in its settings and telling a story common enough to lack novelty. But whether the audience will or no, before the film closes they find themselves almost tense with the strength of their emotions. It is an old story, told with ability and sympathy, and presented with adequate mechanical effects. - The Moving Picture World, November 26, 1910


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