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Jodaeiye Nader az Simin
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Reviews & Ratings for
A Separation More at IMDbPro »Jodaeiye Nader az Simin (original title)

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170 out of 206 people found the following review useful:

Maybe the movie of the year

9/10
Author: stensson from Stockholm, Sweden
10 October 2011

And it comes from Iran. The first thing you read on the screen is "In the name of God". Well, anyway it's the best story, the best cutting, the best actors you've seen for long. And few films are that stomach-turning, although there's hardly any physical violence.

A wife wants to go abroad. Her husband can't because he wants to take of his senile father. The wife moves and the husband hires a woman to look after his father.

And then the screw turns, although most of the story takes place in everyday Iranian life. The center of it all is perhaps the daughter, who is nearly teared apart. But it takes time until you realize that. Anyway, I can almost guarantee you sit the film through, until the final post-texts has passed.

So amazingly clever.

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152 out of 188 people found the following review useful:

Iranian cinema lands in the west with a bang. Phenomenal.

9/10
Author: markgorman from United Kingdom
9 July 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I've never seen an Iranian move but the country has a rich movie culture that has broken through with A Separation which won the Golden Bear, best actor and best actress awards at Berlin earlier this year. And I can understand why.

Don't go expecting lavish cinematography, this is shot on hand held cameras, or certainly on fairly shaky tripods throughout, often under the harsh glare of fluorescent lighting that throws a watery blue cast over the action at times. But that is highly appropriate because this movie has a creeping sense of voyeurism throughout as the intensely private happenings of a family, and perhaps country, in turmoil steadily build up into a furious climax.

The plot is complex to say the least, but one can keep up by fully concentrating on each twist and turn of this micro-thriller.

The oppression of the Koran in this staunchly Muslim country carries a heavy burden throughout the film and it's the most frequently used prop as one of the characters in particular, the victim of a central crime, seeks spiritual guidance throughout. It's importance and oppression is palpable.

The story concerns the vain attempts of a wife (superbly acted by Leila Hatami) to leave Tehran with her husband to improve the life of their 12 year old daughter. But the husband cannot force himself to leave his Alzheimer's afflicted father behind and so stalemate ensues and divorce becomes the only alternative, this results in a separation and so the father (played to perfection by Peyman Moaadi) is forced to hire a nurse to look after his desperately sad father during the day.

One thing leads to another and inadvertently the husband pushes the nurse so that she ends up aborting her child.

This sets off a horrendous chain of events that I will not reveal here for fear of spoiling it for you.

Suffice to say the tension mounts throughout the movie and culminates in a heartbreaking decision for the couple's 12 year old daughter that is resolved in a way that Michael Hanneke would applaud vigorously.

This movie deals with important themes of family loyalty (more than love), duty, the oppression and folly of religion and pride.

Without overbearing pride much of the consequences of this film would not happen. Time and again you silently shout at the screen "just do the right thing and this mess will be resolved." They never do.

It could almost be played for laughs so farcical are the the situations the main protagonists find themselves in. But this is no comedy, far from it. It's a tearjerker and feels bitterly real, believable and often futile.

It's as good as its billing. See it.

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184 out of 267 people found the following review useful:

That's an Iranian Drama !!

10/10
Author: Vahid Feizkhah from Rasht, Iran
8 March 2011

I think this movie is the savior of Iranian cinema.Asghar Farhadi is a smart director and all of his movies are talking about Iranian society. Nowadays religious intolerance is the main problem of Iranian society and Farhadi decided to show this matter in his latest film.We have to appreciate him because at the age of poor Iranian movies we have a brilliant movie on screens. About the actors , that is the second experience of Peyman Moaadi who had seen before in last Farhadi's film (About Eli 2009), but he acted more professional than he is , as an intolerant person and doesn't let his family to go to abroad. About actresses , Leila Hatami & Sareh Bayat performed unconventionally great and I think that was the most important movie that they have ever acted in. I hope it will win the Best Foreign Language Film title in 84th Academy Awards. Good Luck for Iranian Movies , Directors , Actors & Actresses and .....

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120 out of 144 people found the following review useful:

Mankind Is Flawed

10/10
Author: Claudio Carvalho from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
13 January 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

In Tehran, the teacher Simin (Leila Hatami) has requested the divorce from her husband, the bank clerk Nader (Peyman Moadi). Simin wishes to live abroad to give a better life to her eleven year-old daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi) and Nader, who is a family man but very arrogant, wants to stay to take care of his father (Ali-Asghar Shahbazi) that has Alzheimer. Simin moves to the house of her mother and Nader hires the religious Razieh (Sareh Bayat) to take care of his father while he is working.

Razieh is pregnant but she does not tell her husband Hodjat (Shahab Hosseini), who owes a large amount to the creditors, that she is working. When she arrives with her daughter Somayeh (Kimia Hosseini)at Nader's house, she distracts and Nader's father goes to the street and she goes and gets him back home. On the next day, when Nader arrives home with Termeh, they find Nader's father tied up to his bed and Razieh and Somayeh are not at home. When they arrive at home, Nader accuses Razieh of theft and expels her. Razieh feels offended and argues with him, and Nader pushes her out at the front door. Razieh falls and has an abortion. She goes to the court with her husband and the witnesses are summoned to testify.

"Jodaeiye Nader az Simin" or the separation of Nader and Simin, is among the best Iranian films I have seen and is a fantastic drama that shows how flawed mankind is, no matter in Iran, Brazil, Europe or wherever. Despite the different values of the Iranian society comparing with the Westerns ones, all the characters are flawed; therefore, the plot is realistic. Nader is a family man that loves his father and his daughter, but commits perjury, is stubborn and arrogant and asks his acquaintances to lie. Simin uses the secret that Razieh had told her to take advantage. Termeh lies to save her father from justice. Razieh is religious and worried with Allah and sins, but she was capable to lie fearing the reaction of her husband. Hodjat is a rude and impulsive man that is violent.

The direction is perfect and the acting is top-notch. The story is engaging and believable and differences of cultures between Iran and Brazil are intriguing. I really recommend this film for any cinema lover or people interested in learning a little about the Iranian culture. My vote is ten.

Title (Brazil): "A Separação" ("The Separation")

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107 out of 128 people found the following review useful:

Wow! Just.. wow!

10/10
Author: www.ramascreen.com from United States
28 December 2011

-- www.Ramascreen.com --

Wow! I didn't have any expectation and that's what probably helped but A SEPARATION is a great drama. Foreign language film or not, this is just an excellent, excellent drama. You can't get a more Oscar worthy material than this. To me what makes A SEPARATION unique is that writer/director Asghar Farhadi takes conflict, secrets, relationships and other elements that we're familiar with and mixes them with the culture, religion and gender elements from that specific region. This film, to a certain extent, lets you in on how the justice system works in a place where some of us may be ignorant about. And it's really not about our way is better than theirs or vice versa, it's just how different some things are done…

And this is not just about a divorce or a separation of two individuals The film starts out that way and it ends on that note as well but what happens in between is more of a spin-off story or it stems from when the lead characters Nader and Simin stop being on the same page. A SEPARATION is a very dialogue-driven, a very character driven story, all the actors in this film are marvelous. When the tension is high, they're extremely convincing, I couldn't take my eyes off any of them, especially lead actress Leila Hatami who holds a certain photogenic beauty.

On one spectrum, you have Nader and Simin with their daughter, on the other end of the spectrum you have Hodjat and Razieh with their little adorable daughter. Because Simin takes time off from her marriage with the intent to divorce her husband, Nader has to hire Razieh to take care of his father who suffers from Alzheimer's. An incident occurs that escalates into a courtroom drama but there is actually another incident or a card that Asghar Farhadi hides until it's time to show it further on in the story and the way everything progresses and eventually unravels keeps you intrigued. A big part of what draws me in is the film's depiction of Iranian law and traditions when it comes to divorces and allegations. What may be considered murder, how important it is for an individual to see someone swear on a Koran, how a judge deals with opposing alibis. I don't know how accurate it is but it's nothing short of interesting. It would certainly cause debate and discussion among the audiences as to the fairness of it all. And the story goes through those problems and makes a full round circle back to the separation of Simin from Nader. A highly engrossing film.

-- www.Ramascreen.com --

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140 out of 212 people found the following review useful:

brilliant and gray!

10/10
Author: khoshsirat2003 from Islamic Republic of Iran
18 February 2011

just brilliant! I think Farhadi knows Iran Society very well. he knows what to write and what to direct! with a look into his previous films it's very vivid that he has continued what he wants to make to a more comprehending level.

i think Farhadi is the best director in Iran nowadays and it's not just his directing but he being smart. some might say Farhadi has just continued what he made in fireworks Wednesday or about Elly,but I'll say it's the way to become much more perfect.

this film is about 140 min, but you don't feel pass of time at all. the drama of film is very strong. movie mostly talks about judgment and the fact that what would you do in a gray situation! this film is full of gray Characters and situations. the movie is gray!

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75 out of 87 people found the following review useful:

Brilliant

Author: ditay from New Zealand
18 July 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I saw this last night at the Auckland Film Festival and have to say it is probably the finest film I've seen this year. It starts incredibly strongly then just keeps cranking up the tension and conflict. The characters are beautifully layered, complex and fascinating and the director manages to maintain empathy for all of them until the final frame, simply not allowing us to 'take sides' - which is what the couple's daughter is being asked to do. I hope this film gets wide distribution (particularly into the U.S.) as its insight into modern Iranian family life (albeit a privileged one) might help to erase the convenient misconception that 'they' are not like 'us'.

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58 out of 71 people found the following review useful:

Asking difficult questions

9/10
Author: Lin Patty from Netherlands
15 September 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Have you ever been watching a movie where you could not take your eyes of the screen, not even for one second to take a zip of your wine? This movie is for me a thriller, even though labeled a drama. The shoots were artistically taken; I see a beauty in a scene when a woman is walking with her long vein downstairs. Couple arguing in front of a judge where when she was asked whether the man beats her because she wants a divorce saying: no, he is a good man, but I want a divorce.

This is a universal story set in Iran. Universal human emotion set in an Islamic country. It is difficult for me to pinpoint what the theme(s) of this film. Yes, it begins with a separation of a couple after years of marriage and having a daughter in stake. But that was only a trigger. A trigger to a journey that seeks the boundaries of human existences. A journey where things are not black and white, but somewhere in between. The characters have their flaws but I somehow feel sympathy for them, even for the one who is violent.

Perhaps the movie is about asking question what is a good person, in a situation where it is very difficult to be one.

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79 out of 116 people found the following review useful:

A real tearjerker that helps the audience to think about important but forgotten concepts like responsibility, love, and sacrifice in the 21st century

10/10
Author: Amin Davoodi (amin.davoodi1988@gmail.com) from Kermanshah, Iran
20 April 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The new movie of Asghar Farhadi is a melodrama that captures the theme of responsibility and honesty as well as love, religiosity, and sacrifice. The movie starts with an argument for divorce between Simin (Leila Hatami) and Nader (Peyman Moaadi) before a judge in an Iranian court. Through their argument, the main storyline of the movie becomes clear for us so that we become aware that Nader and Simin have been planning to move to a European country to provide better opportunities, as Simin claims in the court, for their only daughter, Termeh (Sarina Farhadi).

Although Nader was interested in the idea of living abroad a few months earlier, he refuses then because of his father (Ali-Asghar Shahbazi) who suffers from Alzheimer. When, in the court, Simin says to Nader "your father does not even know you" Nader answers "…but I know him." Here, the responsibility of a child toward his father is very tangible. During the movie, Simin insists on the idea of going abroad; when Nader refuses, she believes there is no other way for them except to divorce. Because Simin does not live with her husband and her daughter anymore, Nader decides to hire a reliable and responsible nurse for his father. Therefore, Razieh (Sareh Bayat) enters their house as the nurse.

On the first day of her arrival, Nader's father forgot to say that he needed to go to rest room. Therefore, Razieh, as a woman who really believes in strict rules of religion, does not like to come again to take care of Nader's father. Actually, she does not want to help an old man to go to rest room and even wash him. On a second thought, Razieh agrees to become his nurse again just because she needs the money. One day Nader comes and sees that his father has fallen from his bed and does not move. He thinks his father just passed away. However, he is still alive and becomes OK after a few minutes. Nader becomes very angry of what he calls " Razieh's irresponsibility" because she left the house and there is no sign of her. When she comes back, Nader brawls with her and pushes her out of the house and Razieh falls on the stairs that causes the abortion of her baby and a new challenge for Nader and Simin appears.

Nader is accused of killing Razieh's baby intentionally. Razieh claims that Nader pushed her though he knew she was pregnant; Nader denies it. In the court, Razieh's husband, Hodjat (Shahab Hosseini), who is a nervous man and does not have any job and has many debts, fights several times with Nader and insults him harshly. Termeh knows that his father is lying because she is sure that Nader heard the story of Razieh's pregnancy when she was talking about it with Termeh's tutor, Miss Ghahraii (Merila Zare'i). She is right! Nader and Simin agree to give some money to them to finish the story democratically. However, Nader insists on the idea of being sure whether he was guilty or not. That is why Nader asks Razieh to swear if he is guilty of the abortion of her baby. Although Hodjat really wants to get the money, Razieh refuses to swear because she thinks she is not sure whether the abortion of her baby was because of Nader or the accident that she had on the same day. Due to her religious beliefs, she does not want to get blood money From Nader when she is not sure whether he is guilty or not.

Finally, Nader and Simin agree to let Termeh choose her destiny by saying whether she prefers to live with her father or her mother. Like "about Eli", the previous film of Farhadi, the ending of the story is not clear and it is up to the audience to guess whether Termeh wants to live with her father or her mother.

There are scenes in the movie that are very impressive: When Nader is washing his father's body, while crying deeply, it shows us how a child loves his father no matter he is too old or sick. In addition, when Termeh asks his father about the reason that he told a big lie to the court, we can understand once more how children monitor their parents' behavior as their reliable role models. In addition, when Nader's father holds Simin's hand strongly which shows that he knows her well and no one, even Razieh, can look after him like the way that his daughter-in-law did in the past.

"Nader and Simin, a Separation" really deserves to be considered as one of the top 250 movies ever made. In the 21st century, when we are surrounded by thousands of science fiction movies, "Nader and Simin, a Separation" is a good example of a real-life movie which can help people to revise their ideas about important concepts like responsibility, love and sacrifice.

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49 out of 61 people found the following review useful:

Fantastic film!

10/10
Author: wbeeman from United States
20 January 2012

This film won the best foreign language film for the Golden Globes. It blows just about everything this season out of the water. Don't, don't miss it. For all the hate-filled rhetoric spewed about Iran, this film should show the world, like so many other Iranian films, what brilliant artistry exists in this nation, what sensitive beautiful people Iranians are. Iranian actors have been honed and trained since the 1970's when the modern era of Iranian film began. The principal actors: Leila Hatami, Peyman Moaadi, Shahab Hosseini, Sareh Bayat, and Sarina Farhadi (the director's own daughter) are superb. From the first moments of the film you believe them and the truth of their existence. The stark intimacy of the film is stunning. The complicated plot is gripping and holds one's attention to the very end. It will also be fresh and novel for non-Iranian audiences. It is true in every instance to Iranian society and cultural life. Watch it and learn why American politicians have been misleading Americans about Iranian life.

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