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The Sisal Industry in the Bahamas (1910)

Sisal fiber as a substitute for manila is a comparative recent industry, but it meant the commercial establishment of the British West Indies and is a most important industry in the Bahama ... See full summary »
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Sisal fiber as a substitute for manila is a comparative recent industry, but it meant the commercial establishment of the British West Indies and is a most important industry in the Bahama group. The long, sword-like leaves of the sisal plant, a species of cactus, are cut close to the base and are fed into a machine which strips the watery pulp from the long, silky fiber. The fiber quickly dries and bleaches under the hot sun and the strands are woven into rope said to be fully as strong and lasting as the longer known manila. Most of the work is done by negro hands, for no white person could toil under the sub-tropical sun and long endure, and the young girls and comfortable appearing matrons make picturesque spots against the background of fleecy fiber. All of the interesting operations are shown, including the crude rope walk in which the strands are twisted into a stronger body. Although an industrial, a number of the scenes possessed marked scenic beauty and all of them possess ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Documentary | Short

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26 May 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with The Brave Deserve the Fair (1910). See more »

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