As I Lay Dying
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

8 items from 2017


Detective Thriller ‘The Zero’ Adds Matt Rager to Adapt

26 September 2017 3:47 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Passage Pictures’ movie version of Jess Walter’s detective thriller “The Zero” is gaining momentum with Matt Rager on board to adapt, Variety has learned exclusively.

Veteran producer Uri Singer picked up rights to “The Zero” in August to produce through Passage. Singer’s credits include two Michael Almereyda films — “The Experimenter,” which starred Winona Ryder and Peter Sarsgaard, and the recently released “Marjorie Prime,” starring Lois Smith, Geena Davis, and Jon Hamm.

The Zero,” a finalist for the National Book Award, centers on a cop who wakes up to find he’s shot himself in the head in a city and a country shuddering through the aftershocks of a devastating terrorist attack. As the smoke slowly clears, he finds that his memory is skipping, lurching between moments of lucidity and days when he doesn’t seem to be living his own life at all.

Singer said, “‘The Zero’ paints a moving character portrait of loss, trauma »

- Dave McNary

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‘Morning Joe:’ Scarborough Calls Trump’s NY Times Interview ‘William Faulkner on Acid’ (Video)

20 July 2017 8:15 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Morning Joe” host Joe Scarborough said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s rambling, stream of consciousness interview with the New York Times sounds like “William Faulkner on acid.” Also Read: 'Morning Joe' Rips Trump While Praising John McCain (Video) “I mean the sentences just keep going on, but they’re garbled and make absolutely no sense,” the host said, referring to the Nobel Prize laureate’s distinctive writing style. Faulkner is known for novels like “As I Lay Dying” and “The Sound and the Fury,” and known for his frequent use of “stream of consciousness” — a character’s »

- Ashley Boucher

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Paramount, Lorne Michaels Developing Autism Book ‘Neurotribes’ as Movie (Exclusive)

20 June 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paramount has acquired movie rights to Steve Silberman’s science book “Neurotribes” and set up the project with Lorne Michaels at his Broadway Video production company.

Silberman’s book, “Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently,” was published in 2015, won the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, and was named one of the best books of 2015 by the New York Times, the Economist, and the Guardian.

“Neurotribes” covers a history of the changing perceptions of autism over the past 80 years, going back to the research of Leo Kanner and Hans Asperger. It also explores why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years. »

- Dave McNary

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What is James Franco Reading?

13 April 2017 4:51 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

A extensive look at all those movies James Franco directed.

James Franco has done a lot of things, we’ve heard. Following a successful turn on Judd Apatow’s Freaks and Geeks and a well-received starring spot on a TNT biopic on James Dean, he turned immediately to a litany of pursuits: from playwriting and English degrees to painting and directing no less than ten feature-lengths. The latter project interested me. Were they any good? In Franco’s Rolling Stone profile last year, Jonah Weiner ran around a thesaurus of words like “dizzying,” “indefatigable“ and, wait for it, “multihyphenate” to describe his subject but none of those words mean very much. Paul Klee painted over a thousand paintings in the penultimate last year of his life. So could I. So what?

“What did we do to deserve James Franco?,” asked Rex Reed in a slightly different era. Back then, even the The Guardian agreed with Jared Kushner »

- Andrew Karpan

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‘In Dubious Battle’ Review: A James Franco Period Protest Drama, Dubiously Made

18 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In Dubious Battle” is not the first movie about a labor strike with Robert Duvall as the antagonizing boss man; that honor goes to the 1992 Disney musical starring Christian Bale, “Newsies,” in which Duvall portrayed Joseph Pulitzer. “Newsies” went on to receive five Golden Raspberry Award nominations, but it contained more drama and gusto than this humorless dirge from director-star James Franco.

This smug period drama follows the conventional narrative of an idealistic revolutionary and his fearless leader as they incite a strike among apple pickers in California’s fictional Torgas Valley. Matt Rager adapted the script from John Steinbeck’s 1936 novel, and the film is largely based on events that occurred during the California labor strikes of 1933.

Read More: ‘In Dubious Battle’ Trailer: James Franco Takes on John Steinbeck in His Latest Literary Adaptation

Franco is Mac, a spirited labor rights activist (some say Communist) who takes young Jim »

- Jude Dry

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In Dubious Battle Review

16 February 2017 12:02 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Let it be known that I genuinely like James Franco. Given the choice between ‘yer average pretty boy movie star and a ludicrous avant-garde polymath jester, I’ll pick the latter every time. Problem is, while the self-titled Mayor of Gay Town gleefully smashes through cultural/social/artistic boundaries like a steam train, the art that’s produced at the end of it is… not great.

And so to In Dubious Battle, an adaptation of John Steinbeck’s 1936 novel of the same name and the latest in Franco’s quest to put his favorite books on screen. This weighty literary project has, thus far, borne little of value. His adaptations of Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury and As I Lay Dying were “nearly unwatchable” and “stale and jumbled,” and his take on Cormac McCarthy’s Child of God “tedious and meandering”. Sadly, this trend remains unbroken.

Set during the Great Depression, »

- David James

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Tim Lambesis, As I Lay Dying Frontman, Released From Prison

15 February 2017 8:22 PM, PST | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

As I Lay Dying frontman Tim Lambesis has been released from prison two years after he unsuccessfully tried to have his estranged wife killed by a hitman. As I Lay Dying Frontman Tim Lambesis Released From Prison Lambesis was arrested in May 2013 for trying to hire a hitman to murder his wife, Meggan Lambesis, for $1,000. As […]

  Source: uInterview

The post Tim Lambesis, As I Lay Dying Frontman, Released From Prison appeared first on uInterview. »

- Hillary Luehring-Jones

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Movie Review: James Franco has directed some bad movies, but none as boring as In Dubious Battle

14 February 2017 10:00 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

James Franco’s death march through the American literary canon continues with In Dubious Battle, a John Steinbeck adaptation so conventionally dismal that it makes one better appreciate the artsy, dawdling garbage that is the actor turned dilettante’s usual stock in trade. Every Franco personal project—from his unintelligible, low-budget adaptations of William Faulkner (As I Lay Dying, The Sound And The Fury) and Cormac McCarthy (Child Of God) to his novels and assorted experiments in self-fellatio—is born with a “Kick Me” sign on its back, begging critics to punt it in the keister for making artistic ambition look lame. This one even comes with a freebie: It’s got “dubious” right there in the title. But instead of being sloppily miscalculated (the “Franco touch”), this attempt at a Depression-era labor drama in the vein of John Sayles just bores its way through almost two hours of screen »

- Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

8 items from 2017


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