The daughter of a rich merchant is in love with one of her father's clerks. The father learns of this infatuation when certain papers are presented to him for immediate payment, which he is... See full summary »
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The daughter of a rich merchant is in love with one of her father's clerks. The father learns of this infatuation when certain papers are presented to him for immediate payment, which he is unable to meet. These papers are forged and the man who presents them is Jim, the forger, unknown, however, to those present. Jim is willing to relinquish his claim, provided the young daughter is forced to marry him. She refuses to accede to her father's wishes and runs into the arms of the man she loves. The father tells her to choose between himself and her lover; she chooses the latter and is driven from home. The young people live in a happy little home. They are soon discovered by Jim, who swears to destroy their happiness. He follows the young man to his place of employment and effects his discharge. Try as he may, the evil spirit follows him and drives him away from every position. When at last he finds Jim outside of his home, he steps out and knocks him down. Accidentally Jim's moustache ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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Release Date:

12 July 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It tells by no means a new story
28 November 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is an old title, and it tells by no means a new story; in fact, there is a certain artlessness about the latter to which we think the moving picture audience to-day is somewhat superior. Although it is fair to say that a subject of this simple nature commands great interest; especially amongst the smaller patrons of the silent stage. A pretty girl gives her hand to the wrong man, and she and her young husband have a very bad time, indeed, through the machinations of the defeated suitor, who, in the long run, is found to be Jim the forger. Before, however, the illustrious Jim is run to earth and duly brought before stern justice by a brawny policeman, he works a lot of mischief. He gets the hero turned out of his job two or three times, he makes love to the hero's wife unsuccessfully and misleads the girl's father all on account of these terrible forgeries, the exact nature of which Mr. Lubin's producer does not reveal to the audience. But then it does not do to be too critical of stage law or stage crime. Sufficient for the purpose is it to show that in this piece there was the bold, bad villain with the conventional sneer, that there were the virtuous hero and heroine, the deceived parent, and that all ends happily. And this is the story of "Driven from Home." Artless and ingenious, as we have endeavored to convince the reader, but no doubt very popular with a large number of the smaller patrons of the moving picture theaters, and in this respect, the Lubin Company is, therefore, perhaps wise in putting out subjects of such a nature. The film is photographically good, but we wish that Mr. Lubin's staff would remove or rather prevent the little surface defects in the way of marks and splashes which occasionally disfigure his otherwise excellent pictures. – The Moving Picture World, July 17, 1909


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