6.8/10
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Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away (2012)

PG | | Fantasy | 21 December 2012 (USA)
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A young woman is entranced by an Aerialist. When they fall into the dreamlike world of Cirque du Soleil and are separated, they travel through the different tent worlds trying to find each other.

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Lutz Halbhubner ...
John Clarke ...
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Sarah Houbolt ...
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Damien Gordon ...
Zach Brickland ...
Iren Goed ...
Roufan Gan ...
Circus Marvelous Cast Member (as Roufan 'Jimbob' Gan)
Pei Pei Lane ...
Shaowei Xin ...
Stephen Cooper ...
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Storyline

A young woman in a small Mid-Western town goes to a traveling carnival one evening, where she is urged by a silent clown to visit the carnival's circus and see The Aerialist, the show's star attraction. She is entranced by The Aerialist, but during his act he misses a catch and falls to the ground. She rushes to help him, but then the ground beneath them gives way and they fall through into the dreamlike world of Cirque du Soleil. Separated, they travel through the different tent worlds trying to find each other, interacting with the strange and wonderful performers and performances of Cirque du Soleil. Written by Tony Scheinman

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Fantasy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some dramatic images and mild sensuality | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

21 December 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Cirque du Soleil: Mundos lejanos  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$2,135,000 (USA) (23 December 2012)

Gross:

$12,495,865 (USA) (10 February 2013)
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Company Credits

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Each of the acts/performances was filmed on the stage of the theater in Las Vegas where the show is/was running: the acts from "O" at the "O" Theatre at the Bellagio, those from "Ka" at the Ka Theater at the MGM Grand, those from "Love" at the Love Theater at the Mirage, the act from "Mystere" at the Mystere Theater at Treasure Island, the act from "Zumanity" at the Zumanity Theater at the New York New York and the act from "Viva Elvis" at the Aria Theater. See more »

Goofs

At the start of the film Mia (the girl) is watching the circus. As the Ringmaster says "Welcome to Circus Marvelous" the Dwarf, that is standing in front of the Ringmaster, holds both his fists in front of him in a power pose. The very next shot he has his left fist in the air while his right is still in front. Then in the shot after that both of his fists are in front of him once again. See more »


Soundtracks

Got A Lot o' Livin' to Do
Composed by Aaron Schröder (as Aaron Shroeder) (ASCAP) / Ben Weisman (ASCAP)
Published by Rachel's Own Music LLC (ASCAP)
Administered by A. Schroeder International LLC and Blen Music used by permission. International copyright secured
Recording produced by Erich van Tourneau
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User Reviews

 
Somebody get them some Bengay
19 March 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away is a beautiful piece of eye-candy that encapsulates a story that I'll be damned if I can make clear to you. From what I can tell, the film is about an aerialist, who is smitten with the mysterious and enchanting world of "Cirque Du Soleil," and decides to perform with them and explore many different worlds. That's the extent of what I can provide.

Even if you can only extract that, this film is a ravishing piece of eclectic, artful fun, if a bit too wrapped up in its love for visual flair. This was a special released right in time for Christmas (which I would have seen on the big screen, had I not been stricken with a paralyzing flu-bug), and was guaranteed to provide its attendees a bountiful time with lovely visuals, incredible style, and sensory-stimulating excitement. It succeeds at that and for it, it should be commended. I've never had the pleasure to see a "Cirque Du Soleil" show in person, but I question if the story lines are as vague as the one given here. I'm all for stunning visuals, but there needs to be an extractable emotion, idea, or story that is found inside of them.

Take Ron Fricke's Samsara for example, a picture with some of the best visuals I have ever seen on film. There are no words in the entire ninety+ minutes in it, but so many morals, meanings, subtleties, and ideas can be pulled from its amazing long-shots that multiple viewings are an obligation. I have seen it twice now and have yet to grasp everything behind it. I've sort of assumed the idea that I simply will never be able to see everything in that film. I didn't expect Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away to perplex and amaze me in an experience germane to Samsara, but with all that being said, I would've liked some story of some encapsulating message. Should I just assume I'll never be able to see anything here? But I am starting to think, who goes to "Cirque Du Soleil" to get silly things such as morals or to get the benefit of a great story? It's all about the visuals, clearly, and for that alone, this film excels in them. Director Andrew Adamson, who previously worked with visuals on a macro-scope on The Chronicles of Narnia film series and the Shrek franchise, captures the unfolding talent and gravity-defying acrobatics with marvelous clarity and framing. I was stunned by the presence of wider shots, showing the "Cirque Du Soleil" sets in full-form rather than close-ups centering in on a piece of the action. Adamson employs a directorial style similar to that of Steven Soderbergh's in Magic Mike; he wants his audience to see a bigger picture, rather than a condensed, minimized one.

Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away is made for three kinds of people; the kind that have indulged in a "Cirque Du Soleil" show and relish the thought , those who crave to experience it at one point, and the latter category being the curious parties, like myself. It was a pleasant experience - one that zips along at about eighty-two minutes minus credits - and provides viewers with an incorruptible sense of wonder and zest. Seeing these brilliant aerialists , acrobats, and performers commit remarkably talented and precise body-movements made me almost reach for the Bengay. I can't imagine the debates among the artists on who is more sore the following day.

Starring: Erica Linz, Igor Zaripov, and John Clarke. Directed by: Andrew Adamson.


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