Page One: Inside the New York Times (2011) - News Poster

News

Participant Promotes Jonathan King, Diane Weyermann to Lead Film, TV Initiatives

Participant Promotes Jonathan King, Diane Weyermann to Lead Film, TV Initiatives
Participant Media has promoted Jonathan King and Diane Weyermann to the newly established roles of presidents, with King overseeing narrative film and television projects, and Weyermann handling documentaries.

The promotions were announced on Sunday by CEO David Linde. Both Weyermann and King report to Linde.

“By shepherding inspiring and highly compelling films over the last decade, Diane and Jonathan have played integral roles in shaping Participant into the dynamic company it is today,” Linde said. “Their promotions are not only well deserved, but also reflect their substantial commitment to our success and Jeff Skoll’s prescient mission of creating socially impactful content that inspires audiences to action.”

Skoll founded Participant in 2004 as a means of inspiring social change. Its most notable titles have included “Syriana,” “An Inconvenient Truth,” “The Help,” “Lincoln,” “Spotlight,” and “Citizenfour.”

King and Weyermann said, “We are grateful to all the talented artists who share our belief that films can be both popular and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Toronto Film Review: ‘The Gospel According to Andre’

Toronto Film Review: ‘The Gospel According to Andre’
“I don’t live for fashion, I live for beauty and style.” So says haute couture eminence grise Andre Leon Talley in the opening seconds of Kate Novack’s “The Gospel According to Andre,” and the director takes those words as gospel. The documentary is a deeply loving, frequently beautiful testament to the former Vogue editor, who rose from humble beginnings in North Carolina to become arguably the high fashion world’s first major African-American tastemaker, as well as the type of multi-lingual, Russian-lit-citing public intellectual who is perfectly at ease gossiping on TV with Wendy Williams. At times hesitant to press Talley on some uncomfortable but important aspects of his life, the film amounts to essentially a long, intimate brunch conversation with its inimitable subject, and for those with even a passing interest in fashion, that should be plenty.

Best known for his long association with Vogue, Talley has long stood out even in the peacockish
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Kate Novack — “The Gospel According to André”

“The Gospel According to André"

Kate Novack is a producer and director. Her credits include “Page One: Inside the New York Times,” “A Table in Heaven,” and “Eat This New York.” Novack’s first feature screenplay, “Raker,” was selected for the Independent Filmmaker Project’s Emerging Storytellers Program.

“The Gospel According to André” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 8.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Kn: “The Gospel According to André” is the story of fashion editor André Leon Talley’s journey from the segregated American South to the front row of high fashion, or what he likes to call the “chiffon trenches.”

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Kn: I’ve watched André in more than a dozen fashion documentaries — usually in these amazing, over-the-top performances — but somehow he remained a larger than life enigma. He’s been described in various news articles as “Vogue’s resident peacock” or a “towering inferno.” Why had there never been a movie about him? I thought his story deserved to be told.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Kn: I want them to have a better understanding of a very complex man — who has perhaps been more misunderstood than most people — and the important role he has played in American cultural history.

I also hope people will be carried out by the joy of André’s laughter. There are some very funny clips of him on the red carpet and TV that play at the end of the film.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Kn: The biggest challenge was establishing trust over time with someone so experienced with crafting images — particularly his own public persona.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Kn: Abstract Productions, my producer Andrew Rossi’s production company, provided seed funding before we were able to raise funds from private investors.

All of the people who supported the film really believe in the importance of the story and in me as a storyteller.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Kn: “The Gospel According to André” is my directorial debut after working as a producer for many years. Being included among the other master filmmakers curated by documentary programmer Thom Powers, whose eye I have such respect for, is a tremendous honor.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Kn: Best advice: don’t take no for an answer. Don’t accept the conventional wisdom that certain things are off limits.

Worst advice: never talk about my children in a professional setting. Keeping children and childcare responsibilities invisible ultimately disadvantages women the most.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Kn: If you feel a story matters, stick with it. I think the idea of which stories are worthy or viable is still very guided by a male idea of story and the classical hero’s journey, while stories about women are often said to lack stakes. Don’t believe the B.S.

Find at least one or two people outside of your everyday work sphere who support your work. For me, it’s a small group of women I work with as screenwriting partners.

You can make a great film without a huge budget.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Kn: Agnès Varda’s documentary “The Gleaners and I.” I love how she uses the act of gleaning — collecting discarded food, objects — to look at all strata of consumerist society. She combines narrative and documentary storytelling in such an exquisite way, so that the texture of the filmmaking fits her subject perfectly. However, I think what I love most is her presence in the film. She is an artist-gleaner, who collects images, ideas and her observations of emotional responses to make movies and live her life. It’s very poetic.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Kn: Last January, my dear friend and prominent entertainment lawyer Victoria Cook wrote a Facebook post about the “misperception that the (feature) documentary category is more inclusive, less sexist and less racist than the other categories.” The post went viral. Looking at this year’s roster of documentaries at Toronto, about half of which were directed by women, gives me hope.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Kate Novack — “The Gospel According to André” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Looking glass frame by Anne-Katrin Titze

On Andrew Bolton, featured in Andrew Rossi's The First Monday In May: "I think you're right that the looking glass that was the frame through which we understand Chinese culture refracted into Western fashion is a complicated vehicle …" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In my conversation with Andrew Rossi we linked Okwui Okpokwasili's creative process for her Bronx Gothic (with visual and sound design by Peter Born) to Andrew Bolton's approach in The First Monday In May, childhood to Le Cirque, Gay Talese being interviewed for Page One: Inside The New York Times and The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute exhibition China: Through The Looking Glass.

Andrew Rossi: "And I think with Bronx Gothic, Okwui is trying to challenge the gaze of the viewer also and to create a forcefield." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

I was reminded of Godfrey Reggio's Visitors, in which he probed me
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Body and soul by Anne-Katrin Titze

Andrew Rossi (with Anne-Katrin Titze) on Okwui Okpokwasili in Bronx Gothic: "One of the things that I really responded to was the complexity of desire ..." Photo: Aimee Morris

Andrew Rossi, who in his recent documentaries expertly juggled large numbers of people interviewed on screen - The Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition China: Through The Looking Glass (curated by Andrew Bolton with Wong Kar Wai and Anna Wintour's Costume Institute Gala) in The First Monday in May, restaurant and university madness respectively in Le Cirque and Ivory Tower, and Page One: Inside The New York Times - in Bronx Gothic sticks mostly to his friend, writer and performance artist Okwui Okpokwasili, her family and frequent collaborator Ralph Lemon and films the final tour of her one-woman show.

Okwui Okpokwasili in Bronx Gothic

Okpokwasili, who has also worked with Julie Taymor (A Midsummer Night's Dream), is intent on challenging unreflected notions of "the brown body.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

An Artist Pushes Themselves to the Limit in Trailer for Andrew Rossi’s ‘Bronx Gothic’

For years, artist Okwui Okpokwasili has stunned audiences with her one-woman show, Bronx Gothic, a mix of forms (from dance to drama) engineered to relay the experience of black youths coming of age in the 1980s. It’s only right, then, that a big-screen treatment of said show would find a space between traditional this-is-who-they-are documentary treatment and cinematic adaptation — the tack Andrew Rossi (Page One: Inside the New York Times, The First Monday in May) took with his film, also titled Bronx Gothic.

Ahead of a summer release from Grasshopper Film, the first trailer — showcasing the raw intensity of Okpokwasili’s performance — is now online.

Watch the preview below:

From director Andrew Rossi (Page One: Inside the New York Times, The First Monday in May) comes an electrifying portrait of writer and performer Okwui Okpokwasili and her acclaimed one-woman show, Bronx Gothic. Rooted in memories of her childhood, Okwui
See full article at The Film Stage »

Official Trailer for 'Bronx Gothic' Doc About Artist Okwui Okpokwasili

"I wanted a voice screaming out into the wilderness of 'I am here and this is what is happening to me.'" Grasshopper Film has debuted an outstanding official trailer for a performance documentary titled Bronx Gothic, profiling the performances by and life of acclaimed artist/dancer Okwui Okpokwasili. This is the latest doc from director Andrew Rossi, who previously made Page One: Inside the New York Times, Ivory Tower, and The First Monday in May. Okwui has African parents, but she grew up in Brooklyn, and brings all of that to her powerful theatrical performances. This trailer gives an excellent introduction to who she is, what she's trying to do, and how she tells her story with her body in front of mesmerized crowds. This looks like an eye-opening, emotional doc that examines the breathtaking work of a truly gifted artist. Have a look. Here's the first official trailer
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Emma Watson’s The Circle Ends The Lame Spring Movie Season -- The Weekend Warrior

Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.

Even Emma Watson and Tom Hanks May Not Be Enough to Make a Mark As April Ends

The last weekend of April, and the “slower” spring movie season is ending this weekend, leading directly into the start of the lucrative summer box office next week. As has been the case in past years, the last couple weekends in April see a couple movies hoping to bring in any amount of money before the first big summer blockbuster, and other movies that will steal away their theaters. Last weekend was pretty sad, but hopefully a few of this weekend’s movies will fare better.

The movie that stands the best chance at finding an audience this weekend is the tech industry thriller The Circle
See full article at LRM Online »

The First Monday in May review – a sharp look inside the Met Gala

Andrew Rossi turns his documentary eye to the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual high-fashion bash

Andrew Rossi, the director of the illuminating Page One: Inside the New York Times, gains access to another celebrated Manhattan institution with his latest documentary. The film is an account of the run-up to the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute’s annual spring exhibition and the frock-and-awe red carpet Met Gala fundraiser. The year in question is 2015 and the exhibition is the most ambitious to date: China: Through the Looking Glass. Key characters include curator Andrew Bolton and adviser Wong Kar Wai, but the most compelling presence is Vogue editor Anna Wintour. “Andrew is a real visionary,” she purrs. “Our job is help him execute his creative genius.” Rossi later shows Bolton’s creative genius systematically deflated by a few icy darts of Wintour’s disapproval.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The First Monday in May Review

Documentary-maker Andrew Rossi has become a recognisable name, something not easy to achieve in a genre that is largely (and unfairly) overlooked. His work is all about picking institutions apart – that is to say, understanding the people that underpin them. He’s best known for Page One: Inside the New York Times, where he uses […]

The post The First Monday in May Review appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The First Monday In May Review

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

Is fashion art? That question is raised in the documentary The First Monday In May. Actually, director Andrew Rossi’s documentary focuses less on that philosophical debate that on the preparations for Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2015 art exhibition “China: Through the Looking Glass” and the gala party that opened would mark its debut. The exhibit, curated by Andrew Bolton, represented a first-time collaboration between the New York museum’s Chinese art collection and gallery, in the museum’s main upper level and part of its mainstream fine art holdings, and the museum’s Costume Institute, considered by traditionalists as decorative arts rather than fine art, and housed in the museum’s lower level. The exhibit was the Costume Institute’s annual event, but the first time it had teamed with any fine art section and moved into the main level. It will also be
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

See Rihanna's Outrageous Dress at Met Costume Gala in Exclusive Clip

See Rihanna's Outrageous Dress at Met Costume Gala in Exclusive Clip
"The Met Ball is the Super Bowl of social fashion events," Andre Leon Talley explains in The First Monday in May, the new documentary that opened this year's Tribeca Film Fest that focuses on the opening party for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's annual Costume Institute show. This insider's look by director Andrew Rossi (Page One: Inside the New York Times) focuses on the star-studded affair during the museum's 2015 exhibition, China: Through the Looking Glass, which ignited a million memes around celebrity guests' unusual red carpet attire. The documentary opens in select theaters this weekend.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘First Monday in May’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘First Monday in May’
Cultures collide in “First Monday in May,” a behind-the-scenes peek at the making of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2015 exhibition “China: Through the Looking Glass” and its premiere courtesy of the Anna Wintour-spearheaded Met Gala. With considerable access to these twin productions, director Andrew Rossi charts the clash between a variety of old and new world forces. Eventually less an in-depth investigation than a superficial celebration of disparate styles, it’s a tribute to the Met — and especially its star Costume Institute curator, Andrew Bolton — that should fit discerning audiences like a finely tailored glove after its premiere as the opening night selection of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival.

“It’s a kind of theater … fashion can create a dream, create a fantasy,” opines Wintour at the opening of “First Monday in May” — named after the date of the Met Gala. Such fanciful inventiveness is at the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trailer For ‘The First Monday in May,’ Opening the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival

After opening the festival with a documentary on Saturday Night Live last year, the 2016 iteration of Tribeca will stay close to home with the world premiere of The First Monday in May. Coming from director Andrew Rossi (Page One: Inside The New York Times), it chronicles The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Met Ball and their exhibition China: Through the Looking Glass.

“The First Monday in May illuminates the debate between fine art, fashion, pop culture and captures the creativity, passion and visionaries behind the exhibition and gala – Andrew Bolton and Anna Wintour,” said Jane Rosenthal, co-founder, Tribeca Film Festival, and Executive Chair, Tribeca Enterprises said in a press release. “It is an honor to pay tribute to a fellow New York cultural institution on our opening night.”

Ahead of the premiere, check out the first celebrity-filled trailer below.

The First Monday in May follows the creation of The
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tribeca 2016 To Open With Andrew Rossi's The First Monday In May

Don’t get confused, Tribeca Film Fest 2016 will still open in April (Weds April 13, to be exact). But the opening night film has been announced and kicks off the fest which runs in New York City until April 24. Magnolia Pictures' The First Monday in May, directed by Page One: Inside The New York Times director Andrew Rossi, is a trip inside the Metropolitan Museum of Art and, in particular, the exhibition "China: Through the Looking Glass.” A very New York premiere. The First Monday in May follows the creation of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s "China: Through the Looking Glass,” exhibition, an exploration of Chinese-inspired Western fashions by Costume Institute curator Andrew Bolton. With unprecedented access, filmmaker Andrew Rossi captures the collision of...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Tribeca 2016 To Open With Andrew Rossi's The First Monday In May

Don’t get confused, Tribeca Film Fest 2016 will still open in April (Weds April 13, to be exact). But the opening night film has been announced and kicks off the fest which runs in New York City until April 24. Magnolia Pictures' The First Monday in May, directed by Page One: Inside The New York Times director Andrew Rossi, is a trip inside the Metropolitan Museum of Art and, in particular, the exhibition "China: Through the Looking Glass.” A very New York premiere. The First Monday in May follows the creation of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s "China: Through the Looking Glass,” exhibition, an exploration of Chinese-inspired Western fashions by Costume Institute curator Andrew Bolton. With unprecedented access, filmmaker Andrew Rossi captures the collision of...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The First Monday In May to open Tribeca by Amber Wilkinson - 2016-02-22 18:02:27

The First Monday In May The 15th Tribeca Film Festival will open with The First Monday in May on Wednesday, April 13. Directed by Emmy Award nominated filmmaker Andrew Rossi (Page One: Inside The New York Times) the intimate documentary looks at The Metropolitan Museum of Art's most attended Costume Institute exhibition in history, China: Through the Looking Glass.

The film follows curator Andrew Bolton, now curator in charge of the Costume Institute. With unprecedented access, filmmaker Andrew Rossi captures the collision of high fashion and celebrity at the Met Gala, one of the biggest global fashion events co-chaired every year by Condé Nast Artistic Director and Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour. Featuring a cast of renowned artists in many fields (including filmmaker Wong Kar Wai and fashion designers Karl Lagerfeld, Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano), the movie dives into the debate about whether fashion should be viewed as.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Tribeca Film Festival to Open With Art and Fashion Documentary ‘First Monday in May’

  • The Wrap
Tribeca Film Festival to Open With Art and Fashion Documentary ‘First Monday in May’
The 15th annual Tribeca Film Festival will open with the world premiere of the art and fashion documentary “First Monday in May,” organizers announced on Monday. The film by Andrew Rossi (“Page One: Inside the New York Times”) is a look at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s most-attended Costume Institute exhibit ever, “China: Through the Looking Glass,” curated by Andrew Bolton, and at the Met Gala, an annual fashion and celebrity event co-chaired by Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour. The film will premiere at Tff on Wednesday, Apr. 13, the opening night of the 12-day festival. Also Read: 'Pee-wee's Big Holiday,
See full article at The Wrap »

Tribeca Film Festival to Open With Met Museum Documentary ‘The First Monday in May’

Tribeca Film Festival to Open With Met Museum Documentary ‘The First Monday in May’
The 2016 Tribeca Film Festival will open with the world premiere screening of “The First Monday in May,” Andrew Rossi’s documentary about the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s attention-grabbing Costume Institute exhibition, “China: Through the Looking Glass.”

Magnolia Pictures’ “First Monday,” which will be the opening-night film of the Tribeca festival’s 15th edition, comes from the director of an earlier documentary about another New York institution, “Page One: Inside the New York Times.” “First Monday” centers on Met curator Andrew Bolton and the creation of the 2015 exhibit about Chinese-inspired Western fashion, as well as on the 2015 Met Gala, co-chaired by Anna Wintour.

“The First Monday in May” will kick off this year’s Tribeca Film Festival April 13. Produced by Fabiola Beracasa Beckman, Sylvana Ward Durrett, and Dawn Ostroff, in association with Relativity Studios, Conde Nast Entertainment, Mediaweaver Entertainment and Sarah Arison Productions, the movie will be released by Magnolia
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tribeca to open with 'The First Monday In May'

  • ScreenDaily
The Magnolia Pictures art documentary will open the 15th Tribeca Film Festival, which is scheduled to run in New York from April 13-24.

The First Monday In May hails from Page One: Inside The New York Times film-maker Andrew Rossi and tells of The Metropolitan Museum Of Art’s most attended Costume Institute exhibition in history, China: Through The Looking Glass.

“It’s an honour to premiere this film downtown with the Tribeca Film Festival for their 15th festival, and I am truly thrilled to partner again with Magnolia Pictures,” said Rossi.

“The First Monday In May celebrates creativity in art and fashion and is deeply rooted in the creative world of New York, so to launch at a festival that came into life in order to support that culture is very meaningful. We’re so excited to have the team at Magnolia behind the film, bringing it to audiences all across the country.”

Fabiola Beracasa
See full article at ScreenDaily »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites