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Page One: Inside the New York Times (2011)

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Unprecedented access to the New York Times newsroom yields a complex view of the transformation of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity.

Director:

3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sarah Ellison ...
Herself
Larry Ingrassia ...
Himself
...
Himself
Dennis Crowley ...
Himself
Bruce Headlam ...
Himself
Evan Williams ...
Himself
Richard Perez-Pena ...
Himself
Paul Steiger ...
Himself
Clay Shirky ...
Himself
Markos Moulitsas ...
Himself
Brian Stelter ...
Himself
Seth Mnookin ...
Himself
Alex S. Jones ...
Himself
Nicholas Lemann ...
Himself
Ian Fisher ...
Himself
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Storyline

During the most tumultuous time for media in generations, filmmaker Andrew Rossi gains unprecedented access to the newsroom at The New York Times. For a year, he follows journalists on the paper's Media Desk, a department created to cover the transformation of the media industry. Through this prism, a complex view emerges of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity, especially at the Times itself. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This year, the biggest story is their own.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language including some sexual references | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

29 September 2011 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

Page One: Inside the New York Times  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$28,911 (USA) (17 June 2011)

Gross:

$1,067,028 (USA) (14 October 2011)
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Company Credits

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Did You Know?

Quotes

Shane Smith: I'm a regular guy and I go to these places and I go, "OK, everyone talked to me about cannibalism, right? Everyone talked about cannibalism." Now I'm getting a lot of shit for talking about cannibalism. Whatever. Everyone talked to me about cannibalism! That's fucking crazy! So the actual... our audience goes, 'That's fucking insane, like, that's nuts!' The New York Times, meanwhile, is writing about surfing, and I'm sitting there going like, 'You know what? I'm not going to talk about surfing,...
[...]
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Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #1.22 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Paper Tiger
Written by Beck (as Beck Hansen)
Performed by Beck
Published by Astidal, LLC
Administered by Kobalt Music Publishing America, Inc.
Courtesy of Geffen Records under license
from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

 
A look at an important problem that affects all of us
8 June 2014 | by (Lincolnshire, UK) – See all my reviews

An interesting look behind the scenes at the venerable New York Times newspaper that asks whether traditional newspapers can survive in an age of social media, blogs and the rampant sense of entitlement from internet users who demand, nonsensically, that all online content be free. The film and its interviewees argue that blogs largely regurgitate content from other sources and there needs to be a core of journalists on the ground who generate the stories in the first place. Without that, journalism in general, not just print media, will be in serious jeopardy.

It's a subject I have tremendous sympathy for, and while I wish the film was a little more hard-hitting and passionate in its approach, it certainly makes its points forcefully. That's thanks in large part to the presence of David Carr, a NY Times reporter who barrels through proceedings with a refreshingly upfront and frank manner, even at one point berating an interviewee who comes off as something of a lightweight when he slates the papers incorrectly for not doing their jobs. I liked him very much, and he's by far the most engaging part of the documentary.

It's a sad state of affairs, and the human cost is illustrated by scenes of Times employees who have been there for decades packing up their desks following layoffs. It's not just the information that's at risk, the movie reminds us, but people and their jobs and their families. Progress is progress, but sometimes we head in worrying and idiotic directions, and the problem 'Page One' addresses is certainly one of those times; I hope the brakes can be put on before it's too late.


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