6.3/10
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Jayne Mansfield's Car (2012)

R | | Drama | 20 August 2013 (USA)
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Alabama; 1969: The death of a clan's estranged wife and mother brings together two very different families. Do the scars of the past hide differences that will tear them apart, or expose truths that could lead to unexpected collisions?

Director:

1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Kingsley Bedford
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Skip Caldwell
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Jimbo Caldwell
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Phillip Bedford
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Camilla Bedford
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Alan Caldwell
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Vicky Caldwell
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Mickey Caldwell
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Neal Baron
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Dorothy Lambert
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April Baron
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Autumn Baron
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Storyline

A young man in the 1940s raises a family in Alabama after his wife leaves him for an Englishman and moves to England. When the wife dies, she leaves a request to be brought back to Alabama to be buried, and at that point the man hasn't seen her in nearly 30 years. The two families - her original family she abandoned and her English family - meet and make an attempt to adjust to each other, with uneven results. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, sexual content, nudity, drug use and some bloody images | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

20 August 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jayne Mansfield kocsija  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$9,320 (USA) (13 September 2013)

Gross:

$14,376 (USA) (20 September 2013)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mariska Hargitay (the daughter of Jayne Mansfield) who was in the backseat when the crash killed her mother, said that she found the name of this movie "horrible" and wished they had asked her permission to use this title before hand. See more »

Quotes

Skip Caldwell: You hear that?
Camilla Bedford: No, I don't. Birds?
Skip Caldwell: Silence. That's what was hard to get used to. It still is sometimes. It's kind of like floating on a peaceful lake with a tornado in your head or something.
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Soundtracks

Red The Sign Post
Music by Ted Roswicky and David Blossom
Performed by Fifty Foot Hose
By arrangement with Cork Marcheschi, Hose Music (ASCAP)
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User Reviews

 
Fathers, Sons, War, Death
16 December 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I was a bit shocked at how much negative press Billy Bob Thornton's latest effort has received in the mainstream critical media. It's been called racist, homophobic, grating, and stereotypically one-note. Perhaps these reviewers couldn't take the time to appreciate the delicate patina glazed onto the top of this heavy Southern Gothic brew, not only by some stellar star turns, but from Thornton and Tom Epperson's sly, knowing script that bravely refuses to villainize any of the array of characters, no matter how crass or pig-headed their behavior first appears.

I have to admit, I was a bit skeptical of Thornton when he first appeared with the break-out "Sling Blade," even though the short it was culled from was anything but slight. I thought he'd be one of these rural "artistes" who falls back on sentimentality and clichéd characters when he didn't have much to say. Jayne Mansfield's Car, however, proves that glib assessment was dead, dead wrong.

The strongest aspect of this film is it's script, which does what every extraordinary movie does well: drops you into another place and time that---at first glance, anyway---you'd ordinarily shrug your shoulders and walk away from, then gives you every reason you shouldn't: it's populated with people who are confused, conflicted, and multi-faceted to the point where they don't seem to recognize each other any more, even after living in the same house for decades.

The casting is impeccable and Thornton has an incredibly light-touch with all of them. Robert Duvall does what he does best: providing the anchoring figure of Jim Senior with an authority and gravitas that he can express with a lift of an eyebrow. His three sons are wrought over a nice spectrum of angst: Thornton's Skip, the ne'er do well middle son who did everything right but was always a bit too "off" to be dad's shining star. That honor went to Jimbo (Jim Jr., a ferocious Robert Patrick) who played closer to the mold but never saw combat as Skip and Carroll (Kevin Bacon) did, thus considering himself a failure. Skip and Carroll live with scars and resentments from their own tours of duty in WWII and Vietnam, respectively and their anti-war sentiments continue to draw them further from Duvall, in every sense of the word.

Even though the crux of the drama revolves around the return of Duvall's wayward recently deceased wife (Tippi Hedren, a pretty darn good corpse), who divorced him for Englishmen John Hurt 15 years before, the canvas of this film is really about the tortured relations between fathers and sons, and the cost of war and death and what it "means to be a man." The War angle is particularly intriguing in that it plays out in the heart of Alabama in the late-sixties, where the malingering odor of Vietnam melts into the residues of a century of warfare, the star of which is the ghost of the Civil War.

The culture-clash aspect is amusing and well-played, but not even remotely why you should see the movie. The script ensures you know the characters so well, that all that formulaic hicks-meet-Brits stuff quickly goes by the wayside.

Thornton and Epperson's script gives each character a suitable bravura moment and most hit them out of the park, in particular Thornton, in a touching monologue delivered to Frances O'Connor in the forest and Bacon, whose hippie malcontent faces off with Duvall with quiet dignity and aplomb.

This is not a film to hang on for forced drama, but it's one you'll have a difficult time turning away from and an even harder time leaving, from the place where you so unceremoniously were dropped.


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