The boat races are over. Franklin is the hero of the day. He won the gold medal, which is presented to him by the judges. He is cheered all around and hero worshiping is soon at its height.... See full summary »
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The boat races are over. Franklin is the hero of the day. He won the gold medal, which is presented to him by the judges. He is cheered all around and hero worshiping is soon at its height. Hardly has the fact been known and the hero has arrived at home when he receives an invitation from the "Athletic Club" of a little town, "asking the honor of his presence at their anniversary." He accepts and is soon on his way to receive more honors. His automobile breaks down and he is compelled to walk six miles. On his way he is held up by a tramp, relieved of his clothes and incidentally of the gold medal and compelled to don the tramp's suit. A lonely horseback rider does not fare any better. He, too, is held up by the tramp's companion and relieved of his outer garments. The two tramps are greatly surprised when reaching the town to be received with such honors. The hero in disguise makes love to the chairman's daughter. A banquet is given in his honor, and while the second tramp acts as ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Comedy

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23 September 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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This might well be called "a study in clothes"
7 January 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A comedy which is based upon the opportunities for deceitfulness which are inherent in outward appearances so far as strangers are concerned. It is hard for the hero of an important athletic contest to be robbed of his clothes and his prize medal while on the way to attend a banquet at which he was to be the lion of the occasion. It is still more disturbing to be compelled to exchange clothes with the tramp and then be arrested as a vagrant. But it all ends well, consequently no harm is done. And the young man succeeds in obtaining his portion of the honors, including a bride. This might well be called "a study in clothes," inasmuch as its interest is confined to the element of human nature which is allied closely with clothes. - The Moving Picture World, October 9, 1909


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